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Full text of "Current Sauce (Volume 2012-2013)"

The 




u r rent 





Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, August 29, 2012 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 1 



Campus security increases; students relieved 



Ty Johnson 

News Editor 



Y 



ou're better off safe than 
sorry," is an old adage 
senior biology major 
Megan McDaniel keeps in my mind 
as she goes about her daily routine. 

"I try to remember that, but I ad- 
mit I do become too comfortable at 
times," McDaniel said. "Sometimes 
you need a wake up call." 

Last week, university police ar- 
rested a 1 6-year-old juvenile in con- 
nection with an alleged sexual as- 
sault in Varnado Hall. According to 
a NSU press release, he was charged 
with one count of sexual battery, one 
count of simple battery, one count of 
felony theft and two counts of un- 
authorized entry into an inhabited 
dwelling. The suspect is in custody 
at the Ware Youth Center in Cous- 
hatta, La. 

University police detective Doug 
Prescott said student involvement 
contributed to the success of the 
investigation. Eyewitness accounts 
played a significant role. 

"Everything came together and 
it came together quickly," Prescott 
said. "We were very fortunate. It 
doesn't always happen that way." 

"The key was support from stu- 
dents and the university working to- 
gether," Prescott added. 

Since the incident, university 
police has increased patrols in Var- 
nado Hall and throughout campus. 
The university also e-mailed a list 
of safety precautions to _students 
with tips such as "Don't walk alone 
at night", "Lock your doors and 
windows even if you're inside" 
and "Don't prop d*OoTs~"6pen at" any 
time." 

Senior psychology major Angel 
Johnson is relieved to see university 
police taking immediate action. 

"I appreciate what's being done," 
Johnson said. "It's reassuring to the 
students here that just want to get 
their education and enjoy their col- 
lege experience. It's not only a relief 
to the students, but to their families 
and friends back home." 

Sophomore communications ma- 




Photo by Ty Johnson 

Sergeant Leonard Sarpy touches base with Detective Doug Prescott on campus security. Campus police has 22 commissioned officers who rotate on two 12-hour 
shifts. There are vehicle, bike and golf cart patrols. Other officers patrol by foot. 



jor Olivia Martzell said wished the 
suspect had been caught sooner. 

"Honestly, I was very scared," 
Martzell said. "Hearing someone got 
assaulted on the same campus as you 
is a lot to take in. I was worried, es- 
pecially for girls like me. Anything 
can happen. Especially late at night 



when you're by yourself. I was wor- 
ried and concerned for the safety of 
girls on campus." 

Martzell said she believes in the 
buddy system. She calls a friend to 
escort her to her car when it's dark. 
"I don't walk late at night or go 
walking by myself," she said. "I like 



to have people with me." 

Martzell said although the sus- 
pect is in custody, she will continue 
to practice good safety habits from 
now on. She said no one can guaran- 
tee it won't happen again. 

"I definitely feel a lot safer be- 
cause he's not in the public," Martz- 



ell said. "I'm still worried because of 
the fact that it happened. I'm a little 
paranoid, but I do feel better about 
being safe now that he's caught." 
Senior pre-med major Matthew 
Gore said students should not leave 
everything up to the cops. There are 
things students can do to keep them- 



selves safe. 

"I think RA's should call spe- 
cial meetings on how to prevent 
incidents like that from happening 
again," Gore said. "I feel like if it's 
something that's talked about, peo- 
ple will remember to stay on alert." 



NSU education program cited for excellence 




Photo by Jimmie Walker 

Mason Lee, secondary education major; Olive Blanchet, elementary education major; and Emily 
Arledge, elementary education major, actively participates in their EPSY 3000 class. 



Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

The College of Education and 
Human Development 
received an exemplary rating 
from the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education 
(NCATE). The rating permits 
continued accreditation and 
indicates the program is producing 
qualified teachers that meet new 
standards. 

Dr. Vickie Gentry, dean of 
College of Education and Human 
Development, is thrilled to have the 
process complete and thankful to 
all faculty, candidates and school 
partners who have supported NSU. 

According to Gentry, NSU 
reached target levels in meeting 
all elements of Standard 3, Field 
Experiences and Clinical Practice. 
This seal of approval means 



that NSU is highly effective in 
partnering with a variety of high 
and low performing PK - 12 
schools. It also ensures that NSU 
teacher candidates are well prepared 
to work with diverse student 
populations. 

"In Louisiana, public institutions 
cannot offer teacher education 
and other professional school 
personnel programs without 
obtaining accreditation," Gentry 
said. "While all public institutions 
in Louisiana are accredited, very 
few are recognized for meeting all 
NCATE standards with no areas for 
improvement cited." 

Gentry said teacher candidates 
who graduate from NCATE- 
accredited schools will be better 
prepared for initial licensing and 
advanced board certification. 
NCATE is working with the 
Interstate New Teachers Assessment 



and Support Consortium (INTASC), 
and the National Board for 
Professional Teaching Standards 
to ensure that teacher education 
accreditation standards model 
teacher licensing standards and 
advanced teacher certification 
standards are compatible. 

"The NCATE report states that 
we had no deficiencies in meeting 
national standards," Gentry said. 
"We were complemented for the 
positive relationships between 
faculty and students, faculty-student 
personnel, and student-school 
personnel. In advanced or graduate 
programs, the fact that faculty 
mentor graduate students so they 
can implement research in their 
classrooms and impact student 



For the rest of this story, check 
out www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

87775° 



Thursday 

82775° 



Friday 

94775° 



Saturday 

94775° 



Sunday 

98775° 



Monday 

97773° 



Tuesday 

97772° 



es^ es^ 



/ / / / 



//// 



/ / / / 





Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
August 29, 2012 



Sororities welcome new sisters 



Contessa Wills 

Staff Writer 

NSU's Panhellenic Council 
began sorority recruitment 
last Friday through Sunday. 
Prospective members had until 5 
p.m. to register for recruitment. 

The registration application 
served as the first step in taking part 
in the recruitment process. After its 
completion the women met with 
the participating sororities to gain a 
better understanding of what each 
organization had to offer. 

In the days that followed, the 
ladies' choices were narrowed down 
by one each day. The leaders of 
each organization then created their 
bid lists, and on Sunday the chosen 
participants received their mem- 
bership invitations into one of the 
sororities. 

The ladies will celebrate their 
achievement with a bid party. How- 
ever, there will be no formal 'com- 
ing out' party to introduce them to 
the student body. 

Students will simply have to keep 
their eyes open for those donning 
the official Greek letters on t-shirts, 
tote bags, flip-flops and other para- 
phernalia. 



Of the four recognized sororities 
of the Panhellenic Council, only 
two--Phi Mu and Sigma Sigma 
Sigma—participated in sorority 
recruitment. 

The remaining two sororities- 
Alpha Omicron Pi and Alpha Sigma 
Alpha— decided not to participate 
in the formal recruitment process 
choosing instead to host open 
recruitment throughout the fall 
semester. 

Bailey McLain, treasurer of 
Alpha Sigma Alpha, stated that 
the reason for them doing the open 
recruitment instead was to be able 
to make a more personal connection 
with interested women. 

"We wanted to have more one- 
on-one time with the girls instead of 
the fifteen minutes you are allowed 
during formal sorority recruitment," 
McLain said. 

One of the organization's advi- 
sors, Stephanie Leray, echoed these 
sentiments. 

Leray also stated that open re- 
cruitment created "a more comfort- 
able setting" and that they wanted to 
be "able to have fun and also teach 
the girls something that they could 
use, such as self defense." 

McLain, Leray and Amber 




Submitted Photo 

Phi Mu Fraternity members Emily Frame, Brittany Jeanice and Emily Pacheco pose after bid day 2012. 



Wilson, vice president of public 
relations and recruitment, will be 
hosting their recruitment festivities 
Monday through Wednesday in the 
Student Union. Interested individu- 



als should attend one of the various 
events that they will host. 

The university takes the aca- 
demic success of its Greek mem- 
bers seriously and has a scholarship 



head for each chapter. A proud fact 
of academic excellence concerning 
the Panhellenic Council is that the 
all-sorority average is consider- 
ably higher than the all-women's 



average. In addition to promoting 
stellar academics, the Panhellenic 
Council is extremely active in com- 
munity service on both the local 
and national spectrums. Members 
are granted several opportunities 
to work with community leaders to 
make a difference through hands-on 
service projects. 

It is a responsibility of the NSU 
Greek community to mold future 
leaders. This is achieved by allow- 
ing members to hold office within 
their organizations, lead committees 
and develop new programs. 

You will find that many sorority 
members hold leadership positions 
in other groups and organizations 
on campus as well. 

While there are many reasons 
to join a sorority, four of the main 
reasons for joining are scholarship, 
service opportunities, leadership 
and sisterhood. 

The Panhellenic council is made 
up of four organizations— Alpha 
Sigma Alpha, Alpha Omicron Pi, 
Phi Mu and Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

For more information regarding 
these organizations as well as the 
organizations which make up Greek 
life at NSU, log onto http://www. 
greeks.nsula.edu. 



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Move-in day transformed 
thousands of empty dorm 
rooms to new habitats for 
NSU students. 
After endless 
unpacking, 
many residents 
ponder how 
they can 
make their 
environments 
more than Style Columnist 

just a place to 

sleep for the next 1 6 weeks. 

How can someone decorate their 
dorm room to make it their home? 

Students must first realize that 
their dorm room's utility should be 
the top priority over its aesthetic 
appeal (which, of course, is also of 
great importance). 

Your dorm should also be 
designed to help you navigate 
through academic and campus life. 

A billboard or wall calendar will 
serve to organize a hectic schedule. 
Decorate your billboard so that 
looking at upcoming tasks is not a 
teeth-grinding experience. 

Also, there are wall calendars 
that match everyone's personality 
or a specific interest. I have wall 
calendars of both cute guys and 
adorable puppies, and the New York 
Fire Department. 

As a result, seeing how many 
days are left until the weekend has 



become a much less painful process. 

The first order of business 
when it comes to decorating is to 
determine the theme of your room. 

It should be something that 
dominates your life such as a 
favorite color or something that's a 
big part of your life. 

For example, I've seen several 
dorm rooms of students in Greek 
organizations decorated with the 
colors and symbols of their sorority 
or fraternity. 

The style and grandeur exhibited 
by your living room should also be 
taken into consideration. 

I of all people understand that 
this may be financially excessive, 
but when in doubt there is almost 
always a cheaper way to create a 
room's fabulous nature. 

For example, Taylor Orgeron, 
a senior and Alpha Omicron Pi 
(AOn) member, bought adorable 
pink and blue leopard print twin- 
sized sheets to use as couch covers. 

Her living room also features TV 
trays to eat from rather than tables. 

She uses the window cords to tie 
up the blinds thereby showcasing 
window fashion and sunlight 
simultaneously. 

My favorite decor in Orgeron's 
room are the pom-pom balls she 
made using tissue paper that she 
hangs from her ceiling. 




Photo by Jacob Labutka 
Taylor Orgeron decorates her living room with pink accessories. 



Orgeron noted that tutorials to 
construct these pom-pom balls can 
be found on YouTube. 

Decorating your living room is 
also a great bonding project for you 
and your roommate. Who needs to 
be introduced and make friends the 
old-fashioned way when you can 
choose what color streamers glide 
across t our living room (if you're 
into that kind of thing)? 

The di^or of dorm rooms is 
what alsc pplies to your life 
experiences. Most people do not 
r ifi through life v ith blank stares 
.Jid empty hearts. 

Also, one (hopefully), does not 
eat the blandest foods available. 
The beauty of life consists of the 



spicy moments, and one of those 
recurring spicy moments should be 
returning to your dorm. 

Are those claims melodramatic? 
Yes. However, you cannot deny the 
truth that your dorm room is a part 
of your collegiate experience. 

A time will come, maybe 60 or 
70 years from now, when you're 
looking through scrapbooks from 
a time before you started receiv ing 
Social Security benefits (one can 
only hope). 

Would you rather see a million 
photos of an empty abode or ones 
of an innovative and colorful retreat 
that helped you survive the daily 
demands of your college life? 



FROG 



WHERE 
FUN & 
LEARNING 
COME 
TOGETHER 



POND APARTMENTS 






pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
August 29, 2012 



NSU 

Speaks 



Do you know 
about NSU's 
Purple Alert? 
Would you like to 
know more about 
it? 

Learn more at: 
alert.nsula.edu 




t 





"/ don 't know anything 
about Purple Alert as this 
is my first year here. I'm 
a transfer from a different 
school. I wouldn 't mind 
learning more about it. " 

Tanisha Palmer 
pharmacy tech, freshman 



"Yes. I am signed up for 
it. I think that it performs 
what it's used for. I was 
glad that they acknowl- 
edged everything that s 
happened in the past week, 
but I would like to see more 
of the crimes that occur. 
It's good for the weather, 
but it could be better with 
the crimes. " 

Brandi Vincent 
liberal arts, junior 



"It doesn t really tell how 
to sign up for it. 1 find from 
past experience that it's 
really useful, but if could 
be better with alerts being 
quicker. " 

Brad O'Quinn 
general studies, junior 



"1 am signed up for it. I 
feel it is good for students. 
I think people off campus 
need it. I am a RA, and we 
have to be able to tell our 
residents about things. I 
wish we would have been 
able to know about things 
earlier and the same with 
the weather. At least have 
alerts an hour earlier. " 

Amanda Bayne 
biology, junior 



Facebook and politics 
are like oil and water 




Katie Acosta 

Guest columnist 



We have all seen political 
"memes" or pictures with 
clever and sometimes 
entertaining 
phrases 
rilling up our 
Facebook 
news feeds. 
They come 
from all along 
the political 
spectrum, 
and normally 
spark a spirited 
debate among friends of different 
parties. 

While some are just harmless 
fun, these types of political posts 
can pose a threat to being an 
informed voter. One thing I have 
noticed about these posts is that 
they either come from the far right 
or the far left. 

Radical thinking from any party 
is counter-productive to being an 
efficient government because a 
good leader needs to be in a middle 
ground in order to bring people 
to compromise and get things 
accomplished. It is really easy 
to fall far along in the political 
spectrum during this election season 
because many people feel very 
strongly about many of the issues at 
stake- higher education cuts, same- 
sex marriage, unemployment- to 
name a few. 

A lot of these Facebook posts 
are people's emotional response to 



an event with little to no facts to 
back it up, causing people to either 
strongly agree or get very offended 
and upset. These posts are not 
solving anything because the people 
who agree with you are only going 
to agree more, and the people who 
do not agree will not change their 
view because all these posts are 
doing is blindly pointing fingers at 
the opposing party. 

Also, keep in mind that anyone 
can say whatever they want on 
the Internet. How do you know 
that these posts are even true? 
Somebody could have edited or 
interpreted a statement in a different 
way than it was intended to get their 
point across. 

Do not blindly believe 
everything you see on the Internet. 
One of the most important elections 
in American history is coming in 
November, and we know that the 
stakes are higher than ever and 
crucially important for the status of 
our country. 

Instead of sharing these 
radical emotional posts, try 
reading government publications 
and watching the news to make 
intelligent decisions for yourself 
and registering to vote in November 
for the issues that are important to 
you. 

The best and smartest way to 
get your voice heard is to make an 
informed vote, not sharing a silly 
picture on Facebook. 









Jimmie Walker 


u rre n t 

^^M>< 1 LJ c e 


Chris Degeyter 


Editor-in-Chief 


Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 




Jessica Blow 


Adviser 


Kirstie White 


Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 


Copy Editor 


JC Bryant 


News Editor 


Jacob Labutka 


Social Media 


Alexis Reliford 


Lifestyle Columnist 


Camille Mosley 


Life Editor 


Andrea Nederostova 


Freshman Scholarship 


Jimmie Walker 


Sauce Reporter 


Taylor Furr 


Sports Editor 


Contessa Wills 


Delivery Personnel 


Catherine Beverly 


Sauce Reporter 


Office phone 


Opinions Editor 


Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 


318-357-5456 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Shakespeare's inspiration: fraud or fiction? 




After doing some research on 
one of the greatest writers to 
ever grace this earth, I have 
come to one conclusion: 
Shakespeare is a fraud. 
This may come as a brash 
accusation from a meager 
freshman such as myself, 
however there are certain 
things about Shakespeare 
that do not sit well with 

me. Camille Mosley 

Don't get me Freshman 
wrong— I have always 
been a fan of Shakespeare. That 
is, until last year in my British 
literature class. We were about to 
start Shakespeare's Macbeth, so my 
teacher thought it would be a good 
idea to brush up on the historical 
events and interests of the era. 

I decided to research Guy 
Fawkes and the Gunpowder 
Plot. If one doesn't know what 



the Gunpowder Plot is, it was 
composed of a group of people who 
wanted to get rid of the monarchy 
and Parliament by using 
barrels of gunpowder to 
blow up the Parliament 
building. I had the creeping 
feeling that analysts and, 
well, everyone else read too 
much into what Shakespeare 
had to say. 

Basically, 
Shakespeare's family 
was involved in the 
Gunpowder Plot, so in order to 
escape a beheading, good ole' Bill 
wrote Macbeth as a nod towards 
King James I. There are elements 
that are in favor of King James I 
including his love for demonology 
and magic (i.e. the witches and their 
prophecies). To me. this discredits 
not just Shakespeare, but his play 
Macbeth. 



Not to mention when King 
Duncan was glorified .and loved 
by everyone in the kingdom even 
after his death. Also, King Duncan's 
successor, Macbeth, ended up 
becoming a paranoid and unloved 
king. 

Furthermore, there are parts in 
Macbeth that are&otTn his original 
writing voice— almost like these 
parts were written by someone else 
(i.e. the part with the older witch in 
charge of the three main witches.) 

Shakespeare is dubbed as one 
of the great literary artists since the 
documentation of time. However, 
after doing the research, I beg to 
question as to if he even created his 
own work. Was Macbeth written 
with some bigger purpose in 
mind, or was it written just to get 
Shakespeare and his family out of a 
terrorist plot? In the end, I'll never 
know. 



Fifty shades of college literature? 



I If you've been in a bookstore 
in the last few months, chances 
are that you've 
seen one of the books 
from the infamous Fifty 
Shades series. Although 
many reviews focus 
on the staccato writing 
style and its shady 
beginnings as Twilight 
fan-fiction, the novels 
have earned their place 
on the shelves of American women 
That begs the question- Should 
reading Fifty Shades be considered 
a triumph for those who do not 
normally read? Personally. I think 
not. There's nothing shameful 
about reading novels that focus 
on sex, but it's nothing to it's not 
something to brag about in the 
classroom. 

Now. in a college setting, I've 
seen a few students use Fifty- 
Shades as an example of a novel 
that they would highly recommend 



Catherine Beverly 

Opinions Editor 



novel to others. I don't want to 
seem like a book snob, but there are 
plenty of well-written stories 
that you could suggest to 
others in an academic setting. 
I have no issues with 
Uk romance novels, but I 

don't go around telling my 
professors to read The 
Darkest Night. There is 
nothing bad about reading 
stories of a sexual nature, 
but it requires a higher level of style 
for it to be appropriate for college- 
level reading. 

The Guardian's Zoe Williams 
points out a major reason that 
women suddenly seemed interested 
in this novel— ease. Instead of 
sneaking a romance novel out at 
the library, you can order it from 
Amazon. 

Women see that they can 
experiment with this genre of 
fiction in a way that may not have 
been socially acceptable before. 



The fact that this series is accepted 
by popular review and that there 
are others just like you makes 
these books a virtual gold mine 
for the aforementioned group of 
women. They throw themselves 
into this opportunity to experiment 
in public with something they 
probably haven't experienced 
before— Bondage, Dominance and 
Sadomasochism, or BDSM. 

Mainstream America hasn't 
been big on discussing things of 
a sexual nature, so adding one 
book of so-called "Mommy porn" 
won't change that dynamic. When 
the literature is subpar, so is the 
discourse. Sensationalizing the act 
of sadomasochism doesn't teach 
people about the meaning of this 
subset of individuals. 

Instead of creating an interesting 
look into the life of a submissive, 
the author took two already flat 
characters and pushed them farther 
into an unrealistic life. 



Christian Grey, the main 
character of the Fifty Shades series, 
is more controlling and selfish 
than understanding of his partners' 
needs. Despite the fact that he is 
portrayed as a cold billionaire, 
women have commented endlessly 
on how perfect he is. 

Meanwhile, heroine Anastasia 
Steele is the epitome of repetitive. 
In the first book she rolls her eyes 
73 times, bites her lip 30 times and 
says she is "exploding" 25 times 
around her beau Christian Grey. 

All of this adds up to a 
repetitive read with tons of sex 
and unimaginative characters. This 
means that it's like every other fan- 
fiction. 

If you're interested in well- 
written novels (with a little bit of 
dirt in them) your professors and 
classmates may find interesting, try 
Like Water for Chocolate by Laura 
Esquivel. 



We need writers! 

Our newspaper 
needs stories 
written by students. 
Come by our office, 
227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join. 




Meetings: 
Mondays, 6:50 p.m 

We hope to hear 
from you! 

- Current Sauce 
staff 




Glitter ain't gold 

As a freshman at NSU I was 
required to get a meal plan 
that I could really only use 
at Iberville 
Dining Hall. 
I was given 
a declining 
balance in 
addition to the 
set number of 

Robin Maxile meals - but 

. , ■ . by the time 
Cruest columnist J 

week three had 

arrived it was gone. 

I was left with no other choice 
but to eat in the cafeteria, which 
was a tragedy for me. I do not like 
their food. I thought it was vile, 
well with them not being able to 
season it. 

When sophomore year rolled 
around I was happy to get a 
declining balance only meal plan. 
I thought maybe it would be better 
than being required to have the type 
of meal plan that I barely used and 
frankly did not want. The declining 
balance was a better choice for me. 

It was no longer necessary for 
me to only have to eat in the cafe. I 
could go to VICS for chicken wraps 
or pasta, The Grill or I could just 
go to the C-Store and grab me a 
hot pocket. The possibilities were 
endless! But the best part about it 
was the price. 

The declining balance was 
way cheaper than the $1 ,500 meal 
plan that I previously had to get. A 
cheaper meal plan meant that more 
money was in my pocket, and we all 
know money is the best incentive. 

The variety of food from The 
Grill also made it more thrilling. 
I was in food heaven until that 
great ol' declining balance quickly 
started fading away. Yikes! That is 
the last thing I wanted. I had this 
awesome meal plan that gave me so 
many tlifferent chotc'e'ssTjW I was 
spending it like free money. And I 
know money is definitely not free. 
So what did I do? Nothing (not yet). 

By the time I had had this 
realization, my declining balance 
was on life support. I was out of 
luck (or so I thought). I made a 
budget based on my remaining 
balance, which is something I 
should have done in the beginning. 
Since I budgeted my DB I was able 
to save the rest of my money until 
finals week. 

I learned a couple of lessons 
from this experience. 

Lesson number one: There is no 
such thing as free money. Although 
I felt that the declining balance 
would suit me better, I had to be 
careful in how I was spending my 
money. 

Lesson number two: Just 
because it glittered did not mean 
it was gold. A declining balance 
appealed to me as a freshman and I 
thought I had to have it, but it was 
actually no better than the meal 
plan I was required to have as a 
freshman. The declining balance 
meal plan was actually worse 
because I was not ready to handle 
budgeting for meals. 

So, freshmen, when you read this 
learn from my mistake. Weigh all 
your options and also think about 
your money managing skills. And 
that goes for everyone. In life there 
are going to be things that you find 
attractive and a must have but ask 
yourself. "Do I really need this? 
Can I even afford it right now? Can 
I wait until the time is right?" 

Be honest with yourself because 
once you set it in motion it is hard 
to turn back or stop it. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 
„_ " www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
August 29, 2012 



Lady Demons outcast Lady Tigers 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Sauce Reporter 

The Lady Demons soccer team 
accomplished its first victory 
of the season by beating Texas 
Southern University 4-1 at the Lady 
Demon Soccer Complex on Friday 
night. 

Junior Yanci Johnson, 
Natchitoches native, helped the 
team by scoring twice in the first 30 
minutes of the game. 

"Today was awesome. It was 
time for us to win, so it felt really 
good,"Johnson said. "Our opponent 
challenged us in some ways but we 
came out on top." 

Johnson started the preseason 
as a defender, but the coaching 
staff saw potential in her as she 
continued to impressed them with 
her goal-scoring ability. 
"The credit goes to my teammates," 
Johnson said. "They did a great job 
playing hard and passing. They fed 
in perfect balls to me. It would have 
been a shame if I couldn't finish it." 

The Lady Demons started the 
game very offensively. The Lady 
Tigers was unable to play the ball 
on NSU's side of the pitch foY most 
of the first half. 

NSU's first chance to score came 
at the v ery beginning of the game. 

Ashlee Savona was given a 
penalty kick after she knocked the 
ball into open space to outrun the 
Texas Southern defender. 

However, Savona was unable to 
convert the said opportunity against 
the prepared TSU goal keeper. 

Savona kept pushing and a 
second chance to get her first goal 
of season came in the 41st minute. 
Sophomore Taylor Munix played 
the ball into the middle that found 
the right foot of Savona . 

That score pushed the lead to 
3-0. 

In the second half, sophomore 
Jackie Strug came from the defense 




latnon 



Top photo: Yanci Johnson strikes the ball to score her first goal of the game. Bottom photo: Ashlee Savona beats a defender to the ball to score a goal. 



to score for the Lady Demons 
giving her team a lead of 4-0. Lady 
Tigers responded to that in the 78 lh 
minute with their only goal for the 
game. 

"I was really happy to have 
the win," George Van Linder, first 
year head coach, said. "1 think 
as all coaches sometimes we are 
perfectionists. I felt like the second 
half wasn't as good for us, and we 
need to have a good 90 minutes," 

"Lady Tigers were very athletic 
and very physical. They wanted 



to win bad. They played hard the 
whole 90 minutes. They were tough 
team to play despite the score," Van 
Linder said. 

NSU stands 1-1 in the season 
after the loss with Baylor (0-5) and 
victory over Texas Southern (4-1). 
Coach Van Linder explained that 
this game is a confidence booster 
for the team but there are some 
things that they will work on before 
the next match. 

"I felt like the first half was 
good," Van Linder said. "We 



played a good 30 of the first 45 
minutes. We need to improve our 
play in the second half, but it is 
understandable because it is early in 
the season." 

The Lady Demons will challenge 
Oral Roberts next Friday at 7 p.m. 
in a non-conference match at Tulsa, 
OKLA. 



For complete statistics 

of Demon sports 
visit nsudemons.com 





Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Brad Henderson, senior, attempts to complete a pass across the middle of the football field. 

Demons geared up to 
kick off football season 



Chris Degeyter 

Sauce Reporter 

After weeks of practice the 
Demons wrapped up foot- 
ball camp with the team 
scrimmage game last Wednesday 
in Turpin Stadium. Bradley Peveto, 
fourth-year Demon head coach, said 
the team played a great scrimmage 
despite a little trouble in terms of 
consistency from the second and 
third string. 

The Demon offense succeeded 
in ending the scrimmage with a field 
goal from senior kicker and punter 
John Shaughnessy. 

That drive was commanded by 
senior quarterback Brad Henderson, 
who completed 1 2 of 20 passes for 
120 yards during the scrimmage. 
Henderson was pleased with the of- 



fense's effort, and he believes this 
level of intensity will help them in 
the regular season. 

"The offense is dangerous with a 
solid running and passing game, and 
a strong offensive line," Henderson 
said. "We made a lot of plays, and 
that will help us a lot down the field." 

Henderson led the Demon offense 
as quarterback last season, throwing 
for 1,865 yards and 12 touchdowns 
by completing 179 passes out of 290 
attempts. 

Despite those numbers, the De- 
mons finished with a disappoint- 
ing record of 5-6. It was the second 
straight season the team finished 
with that record. 

After getting a quick jump at the 
beginning of the season, they fal- 
tered down the line and ended the 
season with a total of 3,117 yards, 



1,930 through the air and 1,187 on 
the ground. The offense was led by 
D.J. Palmer, who is not returning 
to the Demon football team, and 
Rumeall Morris, returning as a ju- 
nior this year to run for the Demons. 

As for the defense, senior de- 
fensive lineman Wade Williams 
said the defense learned a lot from 
their training camp, and the scrim- 
mage game. He believes the defense 
will give them a definite edge this 
season despite being young at some 
positions. Last year Williams had 
33 tackles, 20 of which were solo 
tackles. 

Williams also said he is excited 
and really looking forward to the 
upcoming season opener. Demons 
will head this Saturday to Lubbock, 
Texas, to play the Red Raiders of 
Texas Tech. 



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auce 

Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, September 12, 2012 o Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 2 



West Nile Virus sweeps through Louisiana 



Camille Mosley 

Sauce Reporter 

As of Sept. 10, 2012, 
according to the Louisiana 
Department of Health and 
Hospitals (DHH), there 
have been nine deaths and a total of 
1 76 cases of West Nile Virus in La, 
with Natchitoches having one of the 
nine deaths. This is said to be the 
highest amount of reported cases in 
Louisiana in the past several years. 

Mosquitoes are known to carry 
many fatal diseases and viruses. 
What most don't know about 
mosquitoes, however, is that they 
get these illnesses by biting other 
creatures. 

Southern states are the most 
problematic because of their marshy 
landscapes, which make it easy for 
mosquitoes to breed. 

According to the Center for 
Disease Control (CDC), there have 
been about 1,118 cases of West 
Nile Virus reported in the third 
week of August. This is the highest 
amount of cases of the virus since 
its discovery in the United States in 
1999. 

What exactly is the West 
Nile Virus? It usually occurs in 
the summer and the fall and is a 
potentially fatal illness. 

The virus starts off in infected 
birds that are bitten by mosquitoes. 
Once a mosquito has the virus, 
it then hosts the virus until the 
mosquito bites a human or any other 
organism. 

Taylor Hay, a freshman nursing 
major, tells the dangerous effects of 
contracting the virus. 

"Someone I know has it," Hay 
said. "He was fine, and he went 



to get out the car one day, and he 
couldn't move at all. His wife took 
him to the hospital, and he has 
swelling on his brain, so they have 
to do surgery to get the swelling out 
of his brain. There is really nothing 
they can do about it except monitor 
the symptoms." 

Severe symptoms of the virus 
can include but are not limited 
to high fever, headache, neck 
stiffness, stupor, disorientation, 
coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle 
weakness, vision loss, numbness 
and paralysis. 

Milder symptoms include fever, 
headaches and body aches, nausea, 
vomiting, swollen lymph nodes and 
rashes on the chest, stomach and 
back. 

Up to 20 percent of who are 
infected show symptoms. According 
to the CDC, people typically 
develop symptoms between 3-14 
days after the infected mosquito 
bites them. 

Ayanna Cooper, a freshman 
business major, expresses her 
concern about taking precaution 
against West Nile Virus. 

"I really think people should be 
concerned about the West Nile Virus 
because it's very dangerous, and 
we have a lot of mosquitoes here in 
Louisiana," Cooper said. 

"It's very humid and 
[mosquitoes] love Humidity." 
There have been cases already in 
Louisiana, and people have already 
died from this, so I really think 
people should take precaution. Wear 
some [insect repellant] when you go 
out. Just be careful and watch out 
for it." 

DHH Office of Public Health 

Assistant Secretary J.T Lane says 
that preventative measures can be 




i 




NoWNVaa.vHy 
HI Any WNV activity* 
• WN V human dtaecu« ease 
A WW presumptive virrwk blood donort 




Source:www.cdc.gov 

Map shows the distribution of WNV activity occurring in 2012. The state of Louisiana reported 31 new cases of West Nile this week. 



taken to avoid getting the virus. 

"This is an easy illness to avoid 
- if you know you'll be outside, take 
a few minutes to apply repellant," 
Lane said. 

"We want people to be especially 
mindful of this because we are just 
getting to the time of year when 
people are spending more time 
outside tailgating, going to football 
games and having cookouts. Be 
aware of West Nile, and do what 
you need to do to protect yourself." 



These preventative measure 
include the use of insect repellent 
when going outside, wearing "~ 
long sleeves and pants outside, 
having good screens on doors and 
windows, and to throw away any 
stagnant water. 

For more information on the 
West Nile Virus visit the Center for 
Disease Control website at www. 
cdc.gov. 




Submitted Photo 
Only apply repellents to exposed skin and/or clothing. 



Important Dates for Mr. & Miss NSU Election 



Deadline to submit nominations & 
applications: Sept. 14 




Candidate Seminar: Monday, Sept. 17 

7 p.m. Cane River Room in Student Union 



Sept. 17-28 Campaign Week 



Oct. 4 Election Day 



Oct. 11 Online Run-off Election Day 






information e-mail the Student Life Office at 
studentactivities@nsula.edu 





Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

80760° 



Thursday 

80761° 



Friday 

79764° 




University honors J.D. Garrett 




Courtesy of News Bureau 

Northwestern State University presented a posthumous Nth Degree to the family of Natchi- 
toches educator and community leader, J.D. Garrett, at Saturday's football game. Garrett, who 
passed away earlier this year, was a fourth-term Natchitoches Parish Police Juror and a career 
educator as a teacher and coach in the Natchitoches Parish School System. The Nth Degree is 
presented in recognition of unselfish devotion to duty and the willingness to go the extra mile 
in meritorious service. From left, Yvette Ceasar-Williams, Pamela Harris, Rose Garrett, NSU 
President Dr. Randall J. Webb, Northwestern State Director of Athletics Greg Burke, Shanell 
Jackson, Rodney Smith and Edward Scott III. 



Check your student e-mail accounts for updates on the 
status of refund distribution and billing statements. 



Saturday 

78763° 



Sunday 

77761° 



Monday 

78764° 



Tuesday 

75762° 







Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
September 12, 2012 



Augustine: NSU's biggest loser 



Contessa Wills 

Staff Writer 

Darrell Augustine has made 
an amazing transformation 
in the last year. 
The senior computer infor- 
mation systems (CIS) major has lost 
135 pounds. 

At his heaviest, Augustine tipped 
the scales at 340 pounds. Today, he 
weighs in at 205 pounds. 

Augustine's motivation to lose 
weight came from wanting to "get 
healthy and try something new." He 
did not necessarily face any peer 
pressure while at NSU. 

However, he does say that it was 
something that he dealt with in the 
past. Armed with a support system 
consisting of family and friends, 
Augustine began exercising and eat- 
ing smaller portions. 

"I go to the WRAC almost dai- 
ly," Augustine said. "Ilift weights 
for about an hour and a half." 

Augustine also takes advantage 
of the basketball courts and indoor 
track. In the beginning he was 
consuming 1 ,600 calories per day. 



However, he found that he was not 
eating enough. Now he consumes 
2,100 calories per day. 

Maintaining a diet on a college 
campus can be difficult and seem- 
ingly impossible at times given the 
choices, but Augustine has found a 
way around that. 

"I cook all of my own food," 
Augustine said. 

On the rare occasion that he 
does eat out with friends, he orders 
salad. 

In spite of all of the encourage- 
ment that he has received, Augus- 
tine has had to deal with those who 
think that he needs to stop losing 
weight. When others voice such 
opinions, Augustine makes it clear 
that he took the initiative to lose 
weight for himself, not them. 

According to stanfordhospital. 
org, "The U.S. Surgeon General 
has declared that overweight and 
obesity have reached epidemic pro- 
portions in the United States." The 
website also states that "currently, 
about 35 percent of women and 3 1 
percent of men are considered seri- 
ously overweight, and 1 5 percent 
of children between the ages of six 



and 1 9 are overweight." 

Those who are unaware of 
whether they are overweight or 
obese should take advantage of the 
BMI (body mass index) calculator 
provided on Stanford's website. 

BMI is a measure of weight 
proportionate to height. The BMI 
ranges are underweight (18.5 or 
less), normal weight (18.5-24.9), 
overweight (25-29.9) and obesity 
(30 or greater). 

When Augustine's initial weight 
and height were calculated using the 
Stanford Hospital and Clinic BMI 
calculator, the results were 43.6. 
This BMI means that at his heavi- 
est he was in the morbidly obese 
range and at severe risk for life 
threatening diseases such as Type 2 
diabetes, heart disease, high blood 
pressure and sleep apnea. 

By losing the amount of w eight 
that he has, he has reduced his risk 
of developing these diseases. 

Log onto stanfordhospital.org for 
more information on obesity and the 
BMI. For more information regard- 
ing the WRAC's hours of operation 
and the serv ices offered, log onto 
wrac.nsula.edu. 




Submitted Photos 

Darrel Augustine, a senior computer information systems major, before and after his weight loss. 



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and should reference America, Heroes, or 
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but no more than 4 can be used. 

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♦ Winner will be announced on our Facebook 
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♦ Contest is open to any current NSU Student. 

♦ See Official Rules on our Facebook page or at 
any branch. 






Peoples State Bank 



Step outside your comfort zone 



Jacob Labutka 

Style Columnist 



Every day people make 
decisions that are mostly 
in their comfort zone. 
They might hang out with that 
same group of 
friends or wear #\ 
those same 
pair of pleated 
pants (which in 
most casual 
situations 
I hardly 
recommend, 
especially for guys). 

We have become content 
with what is easy and familiar (I 
am no exception to this). When 
approaching what is different, we 
need to face it straightforwardly and 
try it out. 

There's nothing wrong with 
hanging out w ith those same groups 
of friends, but there's also nothing 
wrong with expanding your trust 
circle. Now to get back to the 
sub ject of pants and related items, 
there's also nothing wrong with 
bringing something different into 
the dressing room. 

For example, something that I 
abhorred for the longest time was 
w earing tank tops. The thought 
of having my underarms exposed 
made me cringe with disgust (I'm 
admittedly being overdramatic). 

But the day came when I saw 
an American Apparel tank top that 
was too cute to resist, and now I 



am a proud tank top owner. And I 
shall continue my search for cute 
tank tops as 1 keep resisting my 
subconscious urge to resist them. 
I often 




hear my 
friends say 
that they 
don't like 
a particular 
style or 
color on 
them. 
Chances 
are, they 
tried a 
style or 
color on 
once or 
twice and 
it gave 

them an initial bad impression. I 
insist that they give the different 
style or color another chance. 

If it's something absolutely 
detestable like platform flip-flops 
then it's perfectly fine to say no. 
But if it's something you say you 
don't like but secretly wish to 
explore, then go for it! 

The worst-case scenario is that 
you will try a few variations of the 
item and not like it. At least you 
can say tLat you made an attempt to 
go out of your comfort zone. 

Apart from clot'iing, there are a 
. ariety of accesso. s that we often 
don't think to incorporate into our 



style. Come to think of it, many of 
us do not use accessories at all. 

Once again, I am also guilty of 
not expanding my horizons into the 

accessories 

department. 
Something 
I've never 
given much 
thought to 
is wearing 
suspenders. 

Suspenders 

always 
seemed 
like they 
belonged on 
men from 
another 
time or on 

the iconic nerd, Steve Urkel. But 
after seeing how dapper they look 
on others with the right wardrobe, 
I put my judgments aside. I soon 
hope to be the proud owner of black 
suspenders. 

What we're used to wearing 
in our wardrobes can make us 
distinguishably fashionable or 
redundant. 

Take a chance and buy some new 
pants. In other words, go try on 
different styles of clothing in your 
size or accessories because you just 
might like it. 



Lady of the Bracelet 

Informational meetings: For more information 

contact: 

Sept. 18, Sept. 20, Oct. 4 aguidry006@student. 

nsula.edu 

President's Room in 
Friedman Student Union 



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pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
September 12, 2012 



Nip it in the bud: a look at circumcision in America 



Genital mutilation is a 
huge issue, even in our 
supposedly modem society, 
but much of the public seems to 
ignore circumcision as a problem 
for a majority of male newborns in 
the United States. This procedure is 
so ingrained in our society and we 
don't even seem to realize this. 

Western culture has dealt with 
the issue of whether or not to 
circumcise a newborn for thousands 
of years, yet there has been no 
decision reached in America 
about the actual health benefits of 
circumcision until recently. The 
American Academy of Pediatrics 
has released a statement that 
says the benefits of circumcision 
outweigh the risks. 

Although this notion seems 
popular in America, the majority 




Catherine Beverly 

Opinions Editor 

of the population in the countries 
of New Zealand, Japan, Germany, 
Sweden, France, Italy and 
England are less likely to practice 
circumcision. 

The invention of circumcision 
as a ritual came about in a few 
different ways, but it seems that the 
Australian Aboriginals were the first 
to practice this as a puberty rite for 
young boys circa 10,000 B.C.E. It 



also seems that northeastern African 
and Arabian settlements developed 
this ritual for male and female 
children around 6,000 B.C.E. 

If you follow the course of 
history, you will see that this idea 
spread along with the people of 
these northeastern countries. Circa 
450 B.C.E., the first books of the 
Hebrew Bible are compiled and 
included a reference of Yahweh's 
command for all men to be 
circumcised. 

Much later in the 12 th century, 
Jewish physician Moses ben 
Maimom explained that this 
practice was a test of faith and used 
to discourage sexual indulgence. 
Some Puritan sects in England 
reverted back to the law of the Old 
Testament in the 1650s and were 
goaled for their practices. 



These Puritans fled to the New 
World and formed the basis of 
America's social construct, adding 
their ideas on circumcision to the 
fabric of our community. This is one 
of the reasons this procedure is so 
prevalent in today's society. 

Before you judge circumcision, 
realize your natural prejudices 
against uncircumcised penises and 
consider the information provided 
accordingly. The subject of 
circumcision is important to many 
new parents in this day and age. 

Some health benefits of 
circumcision include decreased risk 
of urinary health infections, reduced 
risk of sexually transmitted diseases 
in men and prevention of balanitis 
(inflammation of glands). The risks 
of the operation are obvious, as it 
involves the detachment of foreskin 



from the penis and the removal of 
the excess skin. 

The argument against 
circumcision is that it is a form 
of genital mutilation that is 
reprehensible. Yet, because our 
society is generally accepting of it, 
we do not see the comparison. The 
major detractors of circumcision 
take the stance that it decreases the 
level of sexual pleasure for the male 
and also decreases the amount of 
natural lubricant. 

Without considering the 
obvious religious influence, major 
supporters have overestimated 
the health benefits and also see 
the circumcised form as more 
aesthetically pleasing. 

This is almost completely 
related to social influences. As 
there is a higher probability to 



see a circumcised penis than an 
uncircumcised one, supporters 
are likely to find that they 
unconsciously prefer the aesthetic 
and idea of a circumcised penis. 

Consider the side of those 
against circumcision who see it as 
a form of non-consensual genital 
mutilation, however normalized. 
Although I do not support the 
banning of either option, I believe 
society should be less biased and 
learn about both sides of this 
argument. 

If you would like more 
information on this subject, 
my sources were: www. 
historyofcircumcision.net and the 
Wikipedia article "Prevalence of 
Circumcision." 




Andrea 
Nederostova 

Sauce Reporter 



Student parking 
"problem" isn't 
really an issue 

At the beginning of every semester, I hear many 
students complain about the lack of parking 
spaces on campus. Students have been late for 
their classes since the very first day of the semester, 
and their apologies are very similar. "I could not find a 
parking spot for my car," is one of them. 

The issue of a lack of parking spots is not true. Our 
campus has enough parking spots. The issue we have 
is that nobody wants to walk. I see people re-parking 
their car to go from Iberville Cafeteria to Kyser Hall. 

Now that is the problem. 

There is one big parking lot 
in particular that I would like to 
point out. It is the parking lot that 
is located among the Coliseum, 
Tennis Complex and Turpin 
Stadium. Unless there is an athletic 
event or graduation, the parking 
lot is pretty much empty. 

But wait, does that mean 
that you will have to walk five 
minutes to get to your building? 
Yes, it does. Now think about it. Those five minutes of 
walking can get you to class faster than wasting time 
while looking for a parking spot for 10 minutes or even 
longer. 

If you live on campus and you drive your car 
around, you might think about saving some gas by 
parking next to your dorm. At the same time, you 
would do a good deed by leaving some free parking 
spots for commuters. We all need to be aware of the 
fact that we are lucky to have a small campus where 
we can walk from one end to another literally in 1 
minutes. 

I have been doing it for three years now, and I am 
still alive! Imagine how far you would have to walk 
on a bigger campus like LSU. You would most likely 
have to walk at least 10 or 15 minutes from the closest 
parking lot. 

I do not have a car, so I have never had to deal with 
this problem. I always walk or ride my bicycle. Believe 
it or not, most of the time I make it to my destination 
faster than somebody who drives a car. I can take 
shortcuts while others are stuck in the traffic jam. Also, 
with a bicycle. I get to park closer to buildings, which 
is a big advantage if I am running late. 

Walking takes a little bit longer, but it is a great 
exercise. You can do a huge favor for your heart if 
you walk around campus everyday. Another positive 
outcome of walking is that muscles on your legs w ill 
be toned. So, if you do not like walking, try to think 
about how beneficial a few extra steps per day could be 
for you! 



The views expressed in this publication 
do not necessarily reflect those of The 
Current Sauce or the university. All 
submissions may be edited for clarity 
and length. 

Guest columnists must be NSU 
students, but letters to the editor are 
welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The 
Current Sauce. Information about our 
letters policy can be found on our Web 
site at: www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



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Don't be a social media bully 



Social media is just that — a 
way to socialize through a 
form of media. It is not a 
way to start more arguments or, 
quite frankly, be a bully. I just wish 
people would realize this. 

I am an avid Facebooker. I am 
an avid tweeter. I enjoy Instagram, 
but I am not as proactive with the 
website. However, I was not always 
this way. I used to hate Facebook 
because it was taking away from 
Myspace, and I used to think 
Twitter was the devil until I saw the 
movie The Social Network. 

I suddenly became obsessed with 
Facebook and the concept of social 
media. I started doing research on 
Facebook and its creators. In fact, I 
wrote my senior research paper on 
the evolution of media. 

Mark Zuckerburg created 
Facebook (originally called 
TheFacebook) with his roommates 
in 2004. The website was for 
college students at Harvard to 
connect with their classmates, 
friends and college professors. 




Camille Mosley 

Freshman Scholar 

When Zuckerburg expanded 
the website, starting with Stanford 
University in California, he joined 
forces with one of the largest 
contributors to the website, Sean 
Parker. Parker told Zuckerburg to 
remove 'the' from TheFacebook. 
After making this change, Facebook 
became a rapid success. 

By the time Facebook became 
available for use by anyone over the 
age of 13, it was already a global 
phenomenon. With the expansion 
of Facebook, there is always drama. 
Zuckerburg has been sued by, well, 
basically everyone. 

If you've seen the movie, then 
you know what I'm talking about, 



so I won't elaborate further on that. 
I have no qualms with Zuckerburg, 
in fact, it's just the opposite. He's 
made it on to my "People to Meet 
List." 

What I do have a problem with is 
that people have abused Facebook 
and Twitter horrendously. 

The abuse didn't start with just 
Facebook and Twitter, though. It 
has been around ever since people 
realized they could hide behind a 
computer screen to say nasty things. 

What really has me bothered is 
every time I get on Facebook, I see 
petty passive-aggressive statuses or 
when I get on Twitter and see that 
stupid hashtag "#subtweet." 

Seriously? Is there a reason we 
humans can't settle our differences 
in person anymore? 

I am on the verge of despising 
Facebook because of what I 
have to see every time I get on. I 
have witnessed adults arguing on 
Facebook with people my age or 
younger. If that isn't sad, then I 
don't know what is. 



Jimmie Walker 




Damian Glover 


Editor-in-Chief 




Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 

Advisor 




Chris Degeyter 

Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 

News Editor 

Alexis Reliford 

Life Editor 

Jimmie Walker 


Jacob Labutka 

Lifestyle Columnist 

Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 


Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 

JC Bryant 

Social Media 


Sports Editor 
Catherine Beverly 


Andrea Nederostova 

Sauce Reporter 


Camille Mosley 

Freshman Scholar 


Opinions Editor 

Kirstie White 

Copy Editor 


Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 


Taylor Furr 

Delivery Personnel 

Office phone 
318-357-5456 




Metrosexuality 
is a myth; it's 
not a sexuality 

As humans we often find ourselves unnecessarily 
ascribing labels to everything, even if the word 
we use is entirely inappropriate. A label I 
personally do not agree with is the term metrosexual, 
which is used to identify heterosexual men who act and 
maintain their appearance like homosexual men. 

Although the use of the term as an identifier has 
become less popular since the days of Queer Eye, many 
still use it in reference to the feminized heterosexual 

male. The existence of this term 
is a fallacy (unless of course 
you want the Queer Eye cast 
influencing the future of the 
English vernacular). 
The urban trend for heterosexual 
men to give regard to their 
appearance (prefix metro-) 
Jacob Labutka does not make that an 
Lifestyle columnist inherent component of their 

sexuality (suffix -sexual). 
An individual's personality or habit is not an innate 
indicator of their sexuality (unless applying concealer 
is a new form of foreplay). 

The term metrosexuality further perpetuates 
stereotypes about gay men, especially due to the 
metrosexual personalities embodied by media 
figures like the Queer Eye cast. Being identified as 
a metrosexual separates feminine men from the set 
standard of masculinity (that social scientists refer to as 
"hegemonic masculinity"). 

It all comes down to our culture's love of binaries 
such as man and woman, urban and rural, straight and 
gay. If we believe in these binaries, then men in our 
culture are either urban dwelling girly men or rural 
inhabiting manly men. This view is simplistic, easy to 
understand and horribly mistaken. 

We have moved past the age of industrialization 
when dominant sociopolitical discourse was on the 
pros and cons of only city and rural life. Today there 
diverse human settlements that fall in between a village 
and the big city. The same principle holds true for 
gendered discourse. 

We need to evolve past the obvious distinctions 
between man and woman and discuss the plurality of 
identity that exists within those categories. There is 
more than just one type of woman or man. The only 
thing linking people of the game gender is the fact 
that they identify as the same gender (unless we want 
to believe that everyone adheres to a set gendered 
personality). 

If we understand that there is more than just one 
type of woman, then we must ask ourselves how we 
can label a man as metrosexual. How can a man be 
classified as having feminine characteristics when 
women who pride themselves on their individuality 
that is distinct from gendered stereotypes embody true 
femininity? 




We need writers! 



Our newspaper needs stories 
written by students. Come by our 
office, 227 Kyser, if you would like 
to join. 

Meetings are every Monday at 
6:50 p.m. We hope to hear from 
you! 

- The Current Sauce staff 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
September 12, 2012 




Gary Hardamon 

Northwestern State University's mascot, "Vic the Demon," storms onto the field before the home opener against the University of Arkansas-Monticello Boll Weevils, Saturday in Turpin Stadium. 

Young players carry Demons 



Claiborne, Taylor show 
out for first home game 

Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

If coaches dream about young players stepping up 
and performing well in crucial situations, then coach 
Bradley Dale Peveto's dreams came true Saturday 
night in Turpin Stadium. 

Two young players, sophomore cornerback Imoan 
Claiborne and freshman running back Daniel Taylor, 
stole the show as they helped lift the demons over the 
upset-seeking Boll Weevils of Arkansas Monticello, 
31-24 

The win gave the Demons its first of the season (1- 
1). while the loss dropped the University of Arkansas- 
Monticello to 1-1 after an impressive 78-0 week-one 
w in over College of Faith. 

Claiborne set the pace for the Demons. 

Four plays into the game, he made a read to intercept 
UAM's quarterback. Hunter Leppert, that turned into 
26-yard touchdown. 

"It was a look we worked on in practice," 
Claiborne said. "I recognized, covered my guy and the 
quarterback threw me the ball." 

The Demon defense remained strong throughout the 
game and rarely gave up big plays. 

With the game tied 24-all, it was the offense's turn to 
match the defense's level. 

The Demon coaching staff took a chance and called 
Taylor's name. 

He w as lined to the right of the quarterback and 
motioned directly behind him. 

Senior quarterback Brad Henderson handed the 
ball to him, and Taylor darted to the endzone. Taylor's 
25-yard scat to the left side gave the Demons the game- 
winning touchdown. 

It was the first collegiate run of his career. 

"We thought it was a good time to get him in there 
on the plus end of the field as a change of pace, and he 
took advantage of the good blocks and made a great 
run," NSU offensive coordinator Todd Cooley said. 

Last year. Taylor excelled on the prep level, running 



for over 2,000 yards and being named Class 4A 
Offensive Player of the Year. 

The drive started on NSU's 20-yard 
lineand looked to stay there, as the 
Demons struggled to move the ball and 
was forced to convert a long third-and-10. 

Henderson kept the drive alive with 
a pass to senior receiver Phillip Harvey, 
followed by runs from senior running back 
Sidney Riley. 

Riley led all Demons on the ground, 
rushing for 95 yards and one touchdown. 

Coach Peveto described the win as ugly 
but was pleased with his team's effort. 

"There are quite a few teams out there 
who have been upset," Peveto said. "We 
won the game. We beat a team that played 
extremely hard by playing extremely hard 
ourselves and finishing the game, something 
we struggled with a year ago." 

The Purple Swarm Defense forced four 
turnovers, three interceptions and one fumble 
recover. Two of those interceptions were 
returned for a touchdown. 

Despite the turnovers, Arkansas-Monticello 
never backed down. The team received big plays 
from receiver Jamal Nixon and running back 
Blake Prince. 

Nixon scored UAM's first points of the game 
when he caught a pass through the middle before 
eluding several Demon tackles en route to the 
endzone. His touchdown cut the lead to 14-7. 

After Demon senior kicker John Shaughnessy 
nailed a 47-yarder to put NSU up 17-7, UAM's 
Prince returned the ensuing kickoff for an 82-yard 
touchdown. 

"Give UAM a lot of credit for playing hard, but 
we had a ton of self-inflicted wounds," Cooley said. 
"We've got to get rid of the ball sooner on pass plays. 
We've got to be together on the snap count. These are 
not difficult to correct and we did look sharp when we 
had to have it." 

The Demons jump back in action this weekend as 
the team heads to Reno, Nev. for a 6:05 p.m. kickoff 
against the Wolfpack at Mackay Stadium. 






I 



Imoan Claiborne 



Lady Demons shut out LSUS, 3-0 



Johnson adds 
fourth goal 
of season 

Chris Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

The Lady Demons bounced 
back Monday with a 3-0 win 
against LSU-Shreveport in 
the Demon Soccer Complex to earn 
their first shutout of the season. 

The win came after a tough loss 
to future conference rival Houston 
Baptist University Friday in the De- 
mon Soccer Complex. 

The effort improved the Lady De- 
mons to a 2-4 record while dropping 
LSU-Shreveport to 2-3. 

After struggling against a tough 
defense from LSU-Shreveport for 
nearly 30 minutes of play, a pair of 
goals both assisted by junior for- 




Gary Hardamon 

Yanci Johnson dribbles the ball past a LSUS defender to score. 



ward Ashlee Savona came six min- 
utes apart. Those goals were scored 
by junior forward Yanci Johnson and 
junior midfielder Taylor Mulnix. 

Johnson's goal was her fourth for 
the season. She leads the team. John- 
son said the game was positive. It 



gave the team a win it really needed. 
Johnson credits her scored goals to 
her teammates giving her lots of help 
and good shot opportunities. 

"We're just looking to score more 
goals and win more games." John- 
son said. 



In the second half, the Lady De- 
mons played more defensively but 
still managed another goal from 
sophomore midfielder Chelsea Shae- 
fer. 

Brooke Bourbonaise and Jes- 
sica Danku teamed up at goalkeeper 
to cement the shut out of the LSU- 
Shreveport attack. They combined 
for just two blocks, but with the 
Lady Demon defense that was all the 
goalkeepers needed to completely 
halt LSU-Shreveport's advance. 

"Any time you can get a win, 
that's always something positive," 
Lady Demon Head Coach George 
Van Linder said. "We're very excit- 
ed about tonight's victory. It's good 
to get a second win." 

The Lady Demons will look for- 
ward to two games this weekend in 
Arkansas, with a game Friday night 
at Arkansas-Little Rock (2-6) and a 
game Sunday afternoon against Ar- 
kansas-Pine Bluff (1-7). 




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Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, September 19,2012 o Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 3 



Ad space available in Christmas Gala program 




Submitted Photo 



Last year's Gala performance had more than 10,000 in attendance inluding 6,000 for evening shows. 



Courtesy of News Bureau 

Local businesses can support 
the School of Creative and 
Performing Arts at North- 
western State University and 
attract customers during the busy 
holiday season in Natchitoches by 
purchasing an ad in the Christmas 
Gala program. 

The annual Christmas Gala will 
be held on Nov. 28-30 in the A.A. 
Fredericks Auditorium. Last year's 
eight performances attracted an au- 
dience of more than 10,000 includ- 
ing 6,000 for the evening shows. 

"During the past 20 years, the 
Gala has become one of the most 
well-known and favorite events of 
the Natchitoches Christmas Festi- 
val," said Bill Brent, director of the 
School of Creative and Performing 
Arts. "Many of the individuals who 
come to the Gala come from out of 



town and will be looking for places 
to dine and visit while in town for 
the Christmas Festival. Local at- 
tendees from the Natchitoches area 
will also be looking for services 
that area vendors supply." 

A full-page ad is available for 
SI 00 with a half page for S50 and 
a quarter page for S25. The NSU 
Department of Fine and Graphic 
Arts will be available to assist in 
designing a program ad at no ad- 
ditional charge. 

Proceeds from the ads along 
with Gala ticket sales benefit the 
School of Creative and Performing 
Arts. 

For more information, call 
(318) 357-4522 or e-mail Brent at 
brent@nsula.edu or Matt Deford, 
head of the Department of Fine 
Graphic Arts at defordm@nsula. 
edu. 



New budget bill, scholarships increase 



Ty Johnson 

News Editor 

D 

uc to recent budget cuts, 
the university reduced its 
workforce by 40 positions this 
semester. 

This is the fifth consecutive 
budget cut for the university since 
2008. 

Although the positions were 
eliminated or frozen, no employees 
were terminated. They were 
transferred to other departments. 

"We haven't terminated 
anyone," President Randall Webb 
said. ""1 think that's a positive thing 
that we w ere able to do." 

Last June Gov. Bobby Jindal's 
chief budget advisor, Paul 
Rainwater said to expect at least a 
S200 million cut in state funds. 

Total state support for higher 
education— money from sources 
such as taxes and financial aid— has 
dropped.6. 1 percent since the 2008. 

The budgets cuts stem from the 
new state operating budget adopted 
by the Louisiana Legislature and 
approved by Gov. Bobby Gindal 
two months ago. 

NSU's Vice President of 
Business Affairs Carl Jones said 
restricting travel to instructional 



purposes, minimizing supplies and 
reducing positions was necessary to 
save funds. 

"We had to freeze hiring to 
balance the budget, so that meant 
fewer staff and fewer faculty to 
manage the student body," Jones 
said. 

State funding has been 
reduced -by .46 percent since 2008-. 
Approximately 10.7 percent of that 
percentage was cut this year. Since 
2008, the university has reduced 
the workforce by 248 positions. 
Forty of those positions w ere from 
this year's cut . 

"No one is sadder than me, 
Mr. Jones and the members of my 
cabinet," Webb said. "We want to 
reward our faculty. We appreciate 
the good work that they do." 

What does this fall's budget cut 
mean for students? 

Jones believes the effects are 
minimal. 

"The only sen ice students 
might witness is larger class sizes," 
he said. 

Webb said in the past, NSU's 
teacher to student ratio has 
been smaller compared to other 
universities. 

With this semester's largest 
number of incoming freshman 
since selective admissions and 
recent workforce reductions, bigger 




Despite the recent budget 

classes may be a visible change 
for students. 

Despite the reductions, he 
remains positive. 

"All we can do is budget 
wisely and hope for the best," 
Webb said. 

On a lighter note, Webb 



cut, the university increased privately 

said there are still great things 
happening at NSU. 

"This fall we're setting records 
when it comes to privately funded 
scholarships." Webb said. 

This year the university awarded 
the largest number of privately 
funded scholarships and the largest 




Submitted Photo 



funded scholarships by $1.5 mill 

dollar amount in NSU history. 

"The good news for the students 
is we increased scholarships by 
$1 .5 million," Jones said. "What 
w e did was give back to the 
students as much as we could 
possibly give back." 



ion. 



Webb said students who didn't 
receive federal funding can look to 
privately funded scholarships as a 
potential source of financial aid. 

"We're giving back every 
opportunity. I think that's good 
news everyone should know," 
Jones said. 



Creole Heritage Center to host Bone Marrow Transplant Drive 



Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

Are you interested in saving 
a life? The Bone Marrow 
Transplant Drive is an 
event that allows students to do 
that. 

The drive will be held in the 
Student Union, Oct. 12 from 9 a.m. 
until 4 p.m. 

Any student, faculty member 
or organization interested in 
sponsoring a drive is encouraged to 
attend. 



Tracey Colson. public relations 
and marketing director of the Creole 
Heritage Center, believ es the more 
people that join the registry, the 
more opportunities for patients to 
find potential matches. 

"It is important to join the 
registry to give patients with blood 
and bone marrow diseases like 
leukemia and sickle cell more 
opportunities to find bone marrow 
matches to save their life," Colson 
said. "Matches are not based on 
blood type but rather a genetic 
match. Essentially it's all about the 
DNA." 



Anyone between the ages of 1 8 
and 60 can donate, but younger 
donors ages 1 8 to 44 are especially 
needed. Research shows younger 
donor cells lead to more successful 
transplants because younger donors 
produce higher quality cells than 
older donors. 

Colson said diseases such as 
MDS. a pre-form of leukemia, 
sickle cell anemia and other blood 
and bone diseases require bone 
marrow transplants. 

The transplant process has 
improved drastically in the past 



twenty years with 85 percent of 
transplants done through a process 
similar to giving blood: surgery is 
rarely required for most transplants. 

For freshman nursing major 
Faith Decalmbre. awareness on the 
issue is all she needed to decide to 
help. 

"After recently finding out 
information about bone marrow 
transplants and how easy it is 
to give, I would definitely be 
interested in becoming a donor and 
will encourage others to do so as 
well," Decalmbre said. 



Colson said one misconception 
about donating is that a match is 
easily found within someone's 
immediate family, but 70 percent 
of the time matches are not found 
within the family. 

Every person that registers is 
another chance at saving someone's 
life. 

"Donors with diverse racial 
and ethnic backgrounds and all 
minorities are especially needed," 
Colson said. "Of the nine million 
registry members, only about 
seven percent make up the African 



American community and less 
than 3 percent comprise those of 
mixed race ancestry. There are 
74 percent or six million registry 
members that are Caucasian. 

The need for minority 
registrants is extreme the small 
amount of potential matches 
makes the chances for finding a 
match startlingly small." 

Visit marrow.org for 
information. Anyone interested in 
helping or sponsoring these drives 
contact Colson at 661-7CREOLE 
or traceycolson@ymail.com. 



Index 1 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Sunday 


Monday 


Tuesday 


2 Life 


84754° 


89758° 


94/61° 


95763° 


90759° 


90759° 


93762 


3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



















Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
September 19, 2012 



Brandi Vincent finds her voice 



News Bureau 



B 



randi Vincent's summer 
internship was more than 
work experience or a line 
to add to her resume. 
It was a summer of discovering 
personal independence and a pas- 
sion for motivating others towards 
civic engagement. Vincent lived in 
Los Angeles for eight weeks and 
worked for the Feminist Majority 
Foundation, a non-profit organiza- 
tion dedicated to women's equality, 
reproductive health and non-vio- 
lence. Working with FMF, founder 
of Ms. magazine, Vincent found her 
voice in supporting advocacy for 
marginalized groups. 

A Lafayette native, Vincent is 
a junior at the Louisiana Scholars' 
College at Northwestern State Uni- 
versity, the state's only designated 
honors college. She is a double ma- 
jor pursuing a degree in liberal arts/ 
humanities and English literature 
with a concentration in gender and 
women's studies. 

During her internship, she 
worked primarily on Get Out the 
Vote, an initiative that provides 
resources and information on voter 
registration and encourages citizens 
to become educated about issues on 
their ballot. 

"Our focus was mobilization, 
registration and education," Vincent 
explained. She and other interns 
visited college campuses throughout 
California and prepared to host a 
summit for student leaders across 



the country. "I got to see a lot of 
the state. We showed them how 
to fill out voter registration forms, 
identify the best ways to get the 
forms on their campuses and how to 
lead the Get Out the Vote campaign 
at each school. We hope to motivate 
and energize students to vote." 

Her work with the Feminist 
Majority Foundation included 
campus outreach to strengthen the 
Feminist Majority Leadership Alli- 
ance, a national pro-choice student 
network. In addition to work in 
advocacy and awareness, Vincent 
and others volunteered as clinic 
escorts at women's clinics. She also 
helped with a Ms. piece on the top 
women's studies programs around 
the nation. 

Students in the Louisiana Schol- 
ars' College are encouraged to pur- 
sue internships. Last year, Vincent 
worked at a law firm and quickly 
realized that was not the field she 
wanted to pursue. 

She discovered an interest in 
feminism as a college freshman 
when she enrolled in Dr. Holly 
Stave's interdisciplinary approach 
to gender studies class. 

"Taking that class, I became 
aware of limitations of certain 
marginalized groups," she said. "I 
saw a documentary last year on 
Gloria Steinem, about her part in 
the Feminist Majority Foundation 
and Ms. magazine. 

I did some research and first 
was going to apply to work at Ms., 
but with my professor's encour- 




Submitted Photo 

Scholars' student hopes to clarify definition of feminism and encourage peers to vote. 



agement, I applied to the Feminist 
Majority Foundation. I was one of 
the first and one of the few interns 
from the south. The other interns 
were from all over the country, with 
two internationals from France and 
Taiwan." 

The experience was one of per- 
sonal growth. 

"When I started the internship, 
I was at first fearful and second 
guessing myself until 1 realized I 
was surrounded by young women 
equally motivated and equally 



driven. I also felt confident that my 
Scholars' education was up to par 
with that of women who went to 
Ivy League schools," she said. "I 
was living thousands of miles away 
without my parents and completely 
out of my comfort zone. I figured 
out I can make it on my own. Loui- 
siana is my home and my culture 
and there is a lot to love about it but 
there's a world out there." 

At Northwestern State, Vincent 
is a member of Phi Mu and vice 
president of NSU's Panhellenic 



The Onset of Fall: 
Is it anything at all? 




It's almost 
that time 
of the year 
when we're 
not always drip- 
ping sweat after 
standing out- Jacob Labutka 
side for five Style Columnist 
minutes. 

In fact, we 
might even need to put on an extra 
layer in the coming weeks. This can 
only mean that the onset of fall is 
upon us. 

I'm not calling for a major 
change of wardrobe, but rather an 
assessment of what you have and 
determining what you need. Maybe 
you need a few more long-sleeved 
shirts or, apart from fashion, need to 
set some new goals. 

But people cannot always expect 
to determine what they need by 
sitting in their homes browsing 
Google. One must go out into the 
world and try it on its different 
things for size. 

Better yet, one should get out of 
Natchitoches to gain some prospec- 
tive. 

For example, once or twice 
a year, my friends and I venture 
north to a land of outdoor shop- 
ping at the Louisiana Board Walk 
near Shreveport and Buffalo Wild 
Wings. Even if you don't intend to 
buy an entirely new wardrobe on an 
outing like that, window-shopping 
provides wonderful inspiration. 

This may sound counterproduc- 
tive, but the best way to prepare for 
the onset of fall is to prepare for the 




Submitted Photo 

These are outfit examples of fall fashion in a Disney style. 



onset of winter. 

For instance, if you're in need of 
a new winter coat now is the best 
time to purchase it. Many stores 
have a large selection of coats and 
winter wear that are at lower prices 
than similar merchandise in subse- 
quent months. 

Besides the possibility of shop- 
ping, going on day trips like this 
is a great bonding experience for a 
group of friends. Whether you're 
wanting to bond with new class- 
mates or life-long friends, what 
better way is there to do so than 
helping each other purchase new 
winter shoes? 

Some of this advice may not 
seem as applicable to us in the deep 
south (although there are some cold 
days that take us by surprise). How- 



ever, many of us plan on traveling 
north to either visit or begin the 
next chapter of our lives, especially 
some graduating seniors. 

I encourage those who plan on 
migrating north to buy some winter 
gear here because it is often cheaper 
in the south than the in the north 
where demand is greater. After you 
become financially stable in your 
new habitat, you can splurge on the 
latest north winter fashions. 

Overall, I seem to be ignoring 
the actual fall season. However, 
in this state such a period of time 
hardly exists. 

Here, the leaves don't change 
colors, it's still humid and some- 
times hot in October, and the only 
two seasons here are summer and 
not summer. 



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PEP RALLY 



Thursday September 20 
8 p.m. at Turpin Stadium 

Hosted by the NSU 
Cheerleaders 



Fork 'Em Demons! 



Council, whose philanthropy is 
Circle of Sisterhood Foundation, 
a group devoted to helping girls 
in underdeveloped nations stay in 
school. 

She hopes to work with both 
men and women on campus to start 
a Feminist Majority Leadership 
Alliance chapter and encourage the 
Scholars' College Forum Council 
and the Student Government As- 
sociation to plan events to educate 
students about candidates, ensure 
the campus post office has voter 



registration forms and initiate a 
campus V-Day campaign, a national 
movement to end violence against 
women and girls. She will also con- 
tinue to focus on Get Out the Vote. 

"People forget that while the 
presidential election is important, 
other proposals on the ballot can 
affect us just as much," Vincent 
said. "I care about issues and what's 
going to affect me personally. It's 
important for people to vote and 
feel confident in what they are 
voting on. We want to get students 
registered and educated to vote. It's 
our future that's on the line." 

She also intends to clarify the 
definition of feminism. 

"Students need to be educated 
about what feminism is. It's not 
sexism against men. It's equality for 
all people, equality for all marginal- 
ized groups" she said. 

Vincent is already examining her 
options following graduation. She 
may pursue a joint Ph.D. program 
in English literature and women's 
studies and, with a minor in French, 
would like to teach abroad. 

In addition to writing literature, 
she is also interested in journalism 
and was asked by Ms. to consider 
a blog, "Confessions of a Southern 
Feminist." 

The network of activists she 
encountered during her internship 
was eye opening. 

"Some people think I'm radical. 
I'm not nearly as radical as some," 
she said. 



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pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
September 19, 2012 



Attacks on Islam do not justify violence 




The major headline throughout 
the world is the outrage 
sparked throughout the 
Middle East by a film called "The 
Innocence 
^f|H^k of Muslims" 

g ■ produced by 
\y American 
I^L Coptic 

Christian Sam 
Bacile. 

Protests broke 
Katie Acosta out in Yemen, 

Guest columnist Pakistan. 

Libya Iran 
and Egypt resulting in several 
deaths including that of Chris 
Stevens, the U.S. ambassador to 
Libya. 

The United States has increased 
military security in the Middle 
East because protesters seem to 
be targeting anything American- 
from U.S. government officials 
to fast food restaurants such as 
McDonald's and KFC. 

"The Innocence of Muslims" 
is a low-budget film that portrays 
the Prophet Mohammad as a 
womanizer, a pedophile and a 
homosexual. 

Sam Bacile, the creator of the 
film, told the Wall Street Journal 
that he intended to make an attack 
at the faith. 

"Islam as a hateful religion," 
Bacile said. "Islam is a cancer. The 
movie is a political movie. It's not a 
religious movie." 

Authorities warned Bacile 



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Mongolia 



China 



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CiftMna Mia 




Chad 



■■. . ' . . : . ■ ■ . ■.■ ■ ■ : ■ . ": 



South Ethiopia 
Sudan 




Mysnrnar 

(Bufttal 



Thailand 



SodHtSa 



Saba 



OR 

CO*»QO 





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ysis 



The illustration above depicts 

that this film would be highly 
controversial and possibly spark 
violence. Also, many of the actors 
and employees in the film claimed 
Bacile duped them and their voices 
in production. 

After watching the video on 
YouTube, it is evident to me 
that this video has no artistic or 
cinematic value. It was intended 



all known riots related to the "Innocence of Muslims" film. 



to provoke and create a nasty 
attack on one of the world's major 
monotheistic religions. 

The reaction to this video is not 
the first time we have seen Middle 
Eastern Muslims outraged about the 
western world's interpretations of 
their faith. 

Florida Pastor Terry Jones called 



for Koran burnings in 2010 on the 
anniversary of the September 1 I* 
attacks, and British schoolteacher 
Gillian Gibbons was imprisoned 
in Sudan for naming a teddy bear 
Mohammad in 2007. 

Muslims are forbidden from 
making any image of their prophet, 
even one in a positive way, because 
they believe he is so sacred. One 



thing Americans take pride in is our 
diversity and freedom of religion, 
so I think critics should stop and 
think before they make mindless 
attacks on the Muslim faith. Openly 
portraying anything about Allah or 
Mohammad is against the faith no 
matter what the context. 

The Muslim people have every 
right to be able to worship freely 



and not be bombarded with attacks 
from people such as Bacile and 
Pastor Jones. 

However, I strongly agree with 
the statement U.S. Secretary of 
State Hilary Clinton gave on the 
video: "It appears to have a deeply 
cynical purpose, to denigrate a 
great religion and to provoke rage. 
But, as I said yesterday, there is 
no justification, none at all, for 
responding to this video with 
violence." 

The protesters directing this 
violence to Americans need to 
understand that this video was only 
one man employing his freedom of 
speech. The video is not supported 
or funded by the US government, 
and it does not reflect the views of 
the majority of Americans. 

In a statement by Egyptian 
President Mohammad Morsi, 
he said he did not condone the 
violence. In a telephone call to 
President Obama, Morsi said, "We 
will be keen and we will not permit 
any such event, any such occurrence 
in our country against the embassy 
or its territories in the future." 

I think that the U.S. has every 
right to take action against the 
innocent killings in the protests. 
Even though 1 strongly disagree 
with attacking Islamic faith, it is 
never right to take a life and we 
have a duty to protect all innocent 
people in the Middle East. 

Quotes used in this article can be 
found at PBS,com. 



Video games 
scapegoat 



# » «. » * » t 



for years concenjed .parents 
and interfering members of 
the government have asked 
an important question: "Can video 
games make children more prone to 
violence?" This question comes up 
after every 
shooting or 
murder, most 
recently the 
shooting in 
Aurora, CO 

Catherine Beverly 

Opinions Editor 




premiere 
of the 



movie 

"The Dark Knight Rises." 

Some critics blame video games 
for desensitizing the "Batman" 
shooter to violence, while others 
even blame the movie itself. Lists 
of studies are cited by critics to 
support their claims: increased 
violence in teenagers who play 
video games, lower levels of 
empathy and even an association 
between aggression and arousal. 

What the media rarely mentions 
are the articles depicting the other 
side of the case. For example, a 
2007 study, in which 45 percent 
of boys told researchers that they 
played video games to release 
pent up aggression and 62 percent 
to relax. This could show a shift 
between rough play and video 
games, giving children another way 
to express their aggression. 

While a 2000 FBI report lists 
playing video games as a behavior 
associated with shootings, the U.S. 
Secret Service reviewed school- 
based attacks in 2004 and found 
that as little as 1/8* of shooters w ere 
interested in violent video games. 



should not 
for violence 

More perpetrators were 
interested in violence in literature 
and their own writings. 

Instead of attempting to draw a 
correlation between video games 
and increased violence, critics 
should consider that people who 
exhibit violent tendencies might 
be drawn to video games. Instead 
of creating violence, video games 
may just attract already aggressive 
children to them. 

Another interesting fact 
supporting this opinion is that there 
has been a dramatic decrease in 
juvenile crimes as the sales of video 
games has quadrupled [arrest rates 
for juvenile murders fell almost 80 
percent between 1995 and 2008]. 

If there are correlations between 
violence and video games, it is 
more likely that those individuals 
who are already prone to aggressive 
behavior and violence are finding 
a model in video games. This is 
not to say that banning violence in 
video games could help stop these 
unstable individuals because they 
only have to look to world news to 
be inspired to do horrific deeds. 

So, if there was any correlation 
between the Aurora attacker and 
the movie, it was that he found 
inspiration from the character of 
Bane for his already twisted state 
of mind. Video games do not 
change perfectly reasonable human 
beings into mindless killers-it is 
more likely that they were already 
planning violent acts. Stop blaming 
violence in the media for the 
instability of a few people. 

Statistics and information at: 
www.videogames.procon.org. 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

Or. Paula Furr 

Advisor 


^^jrrent 


Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

Chris Degeyter 

Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 

News Editor 


Jacob Labutka 

Lifestyle Columnist 


Jessica Btew 

Sauce Reporter 


Alexis Reliford 

Life Editor 


Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 


■ JC Bryant 

Social Media 


Jimmie Walker 

Sports Editor 


Andrea Nederostova 

Sauce Reporter 


Camille Mosley 

Freshman Scholar 


Catherine Beverly 

Opinions Editor 


Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 


Taylor Furr 

Delivery Personnel 


Kirstie White 

Copy Editor 


www.nsucurrentsauce.com 


Office phone 
318-357-5456 



Time travel is stiJl v a 
future possibility 





We need writers! 

Our newspaper needs stories written by students. Come by 
our office, 227 Kyser, if you would like to join. 

Meetings are every Monday at 6:50 p.m. We hope to hear 
from you! 

-The Current Sauce staff 




"AW Yo\) DiDNT JtilUK MSA HHP Aft ALTeKW& PMM ft*? 



ftfieiday while driving around n}^ tokvn with m>V> 
jPfcister.'she lookcd'at rne'nnd ^M. hXccofdjiyfe tbj 
; my physics teadki, time travjdjfs not e.N 

and could possibly never exist." 
I listened to her reasoning that 
we would know about tMne travel 
already. 

She proceeded to tell me how 
the time travelers would have 
already visited us and told us how 
to time travel. After listening 
to her, I then told her that, yes, Camille Mosley 
it is indeed possible that time Freshman Scholar 
travel does exist. 

I was reading Chapter 2 in How to Think About 
Weird Things for my social sciences class and became 
thoroughly fascinated w ith time travel and its odd 
possibility. In order to see into the future or to travel 
into the future, one must travel faster than the speed of 
light. 

That is where tachyons come in. But. if one travels 
faster than the speed of light, they are ultimately 
transported into the past, and if one travels at the speed 
of light, they don't age. So basically, traveling into 
the future w ill never be possible. However, traveling 
into the past is logically possible because if one were 
to somehow travel faster than the speed of light, they 
would end up in the past! 

Of course, most of my reasoning comes from 
movies, shows and books, but also from some form of 
logic. Time traveling does exist. The only reason we 
don't know about it is because these travelers would 
never speak to his or her past self or anyone else. 

I draw this conclusion from the simple fact that 
time and space itself would ultimately be altered. We 
as humans w ill probably never really know if an event 
in history' really has been altered because of a traveler, 
but there is the possibility. 

Then, there is the possibility that there are alternate 
dimensions in which these travelers have created due 
to mishaps for one purpose or another. Furthermore, 
there is the possibility that an event could have been 
changed from an almost infinite amount of the same 
traveler transporting back to a specific moment to stop 
them from creating a new outcome in a situation. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of The Current Sauce or the university. All 
submissions may be edited for clarity and length. Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are 
welcome from anyone. All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. 



Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at: www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



4 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalkcr009@student.nsula.edu 
September 19, 2012 




I- 

Kit 





, J em 










Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Freshman Glyna Johnson blocks the spike from the opposing player. Johnson earned SFA Invitational honors. 



Lady Demons hitting full stride 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Staff Reporter 

Northwestern State volley- 
ball team brought back to 
Natchitoches two players 
who were selected as SFA Chilly 
Fillmore's Invitational all-tourna- 
ment team. 

Freshman Glynna Johnson and 
sophomore Mackenzie Neely set 
their career records in kills in Satur- 
day's matches. 

The Lady Demons traveled to 
Nacogdoches, Texas where they 
challenged three different teams. 
On Friday night, the Lady Demons 
played their Southland Conference 
opener against Stephen F. Austin. 
Lady Demons started off well by 
winning the first set 25-15. Second, 
third and fourth sets belonged to 
well-prepared SFA. 

"SFA was the hardest match," 
co-head coach Hugh Hernesman 
said. "They are good. They are a lot 
like us. They are pretty young and 
have some good players. Their gym 
is a really difficult place to play. It's 
a smaller gym, it's really loud and 
their crowd was crazy. I don't think 
we played our best against them but 
I think SFA had a lot to do with that, 
so they showed us some things we 
can work on. We probably need to 
work on being better when things 
get chaotic. When things get tough 
we need to make less errors and be 
more in control." 

Saturday was a better day for 



NSU. Lady Demons started off by 
beating Southern Miss 3-1 in the 
morning match. They continued by 
taking down Robert Morris 3-0 in 
the afternoon. 

"I think probably the biggest 
thing for us was that we were able 
to bounce back on Saturday and get 
two wins," Hernesman said. "I think 
it really showed maturity. This team 
last year, I don't know if we would 
have been able to come back on Sat- 
urday and emotionally reinvest our- 
selves. That was probably the best 
thing for us that as a group mentally 
we were able to rebound well and 
play a brand new volleyball again." 

The only senior on NSU team, 
Nicole Hajka, did not play this week, 
but she was supporting her younger 
teammates from the bench. 

"I feel like the team needs to work 
on maybe having a little bit more 
focus and discipline," Hajka said. 
"The team needs to understand how 
the system is working, and we need 
to trust the coaches in what we are 
doing in the gym and off the court. 
It's gonna help us to be competitive 
and successful in the future." 

"Two people stood up to me Glyn- 
na Johnson, which is our freshman 
middle, and Mackenzie Neely-our 
right side," Hajka said. "I feel that 
they were very aggressive, competi- 
tive, and it also led our team to have 
very successful weekend." 

Johnson and Neely were both se- 
lected as all-tournament team at SFA 
Invitational. 

"I think over the whole tournament 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Sophomore Stacey DiFrancesco spikes the ball past a defender 



the person who made the biggest 
impression was Glynna Johnson." 
Hernesman said. "Glynna really el- 
evated her game this weekend. She 
became more offensive. Mackenzie 
Neely really struggled against SFA, 
and then rebounded really well on 



Saturday." 

Lady Demons will play against 
the Lamar Cardinal Thursday night. 
The team will head to Beaumont. 
Texas for the Southland Conference 
matchup. The match will begin 
at 7 p.m. 



Cross Country takes third place 
overall, prepares for home meet 



Christopher Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

The Demon Cross Country 
team looked strong as they 
competed in the Louisiana 
Tech Mook 4 Invitational. 

The team ran the invitational as 
a practice and competed without a 
full team running. They still man- 
aged third overall in both the men's 
and women's races. 

Leading for the men were Mitch 
Landry and Alex Hebert, finishing 
1 2* and 1 8* in the 6,400-meter race. 



Their times were 20: 1 4 and 20:43 re- 
spectively. Then came Jeremy Elliot, 
coming in 26 lh with 2 1 :24. 

Other Demon men's runners were 
Matt Rodell, John Broughton and 
Chris Lanier. They placed 28*, 29 th , 
and 39*. 

"It was good. Definitely an im- 
provement from the last two meets." 
Hebert said. "It felt good, and ev- 
erything went really well. Now we 
know that we're a team to beat." 

The women's race was a 4,000-me- 
ter run. Sarah Emory, Karensa Ellis 
and Alex Fontenot all ran strong. 
They finished sixth, 11*, and 13*. 



Emory ran the race in 13:21 while 
Ellis finished in 13:56 and Fontenot 
came in at 14:04. 

Erin Knox, Maya Robertson, and 
Tammy Taylor also ran the women's 
race. They finished 26*, 27* and 
33 rd . 

"The meet went pretty well," 
Adam Malloy, Demon cross coun- 
try head coach, said. "It was a 
chance for us to try some new things 
out. I'm pretty happy with how they 
did." 

Malloy also mentioned that the 
team is always looking for and ac- 



cepting new members. 

"Training-wise, we're in good 
shape, and only improving." Malloy 
said, "We need more runners." 

Malloy said the reason he likes 
Cross Country so much is that any- 
one can improve. 

He said he can work with anyone 



check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Henderson nets Southland honors 



Courtesy of Sports info: 

While Northwestern State 
turned its focus to prepar- 
ing for its home game Sat- 
urday evening against Mississippi 
Valley State, the Demons' final non- 
conference outing this season, senior 
quarterback Brad Henderson was a 
landslide winner Monday in voting 
for Southland Conference Offensive 
Player of the Week honors for his re- 
markable performance in a wild loss 
to Nevada. 

The Demons (1-2) and Wolf Pack 
(2-1) combined for 1,240 offensive 
yards and 68 first downs as Nevada, 
aiming for its eighth straight bowl 
game and picked to finish second 
behind Boise State in the Mountain 
West Conference, held off North- 
western 45-34 last Saturday evening 
in Reno. 

Henderson completed 28 of 53 
passes for 357 yards and two touch- 
downs and added eight carries for 
102 yards at Nevada. The senior 
from Starkville, Miss., and East Mis- 
sissippi Community College posted 
the school's No. 2 single-game to- 
tals in passing yards (seven shy of 
Bobby Hebert's 1980 school record) 
and total offense (459, six yards shy 
of Hebert's outing in a 38-31 Turpin 
Stadium win over Texas-Arlington). 

Henderson led Demons to their 
most total yards (585) since 2002, 
most first downs (31) since 1 997 and 
five drives of more than 74 yards in 
their final six series of the shootout 
with the Wolf Pack. 

He broke Don Guidry's 1968 sin- 
gle-game school pass attempts mark 
(by three), without throwing an in- 
terception, and had his first 100-yard 



rushing game. 

The performance came after NSU 
had struggled offensively in its first 
two games, averaging only 177.5 
yards at Texas Tech and against Ar- 
kansas-Monticello. 

"It was an opportunity to go out 
there and show my teammates what 
I can do and really give a spark to 
the offense," said Henderson. "The 
offense kind of struggled the first 
couple games and we were trying to 
figure out what we wanted to do and 
find a way to get a feel for each oth- 
er. I think last week we all went out 
there and we all just played our game 
to see what each other could do. We 
just went out and played ball." 

Henderson is excited about Satur- 
day's 6 p.m. matchup with the Delta 
Devils (1-2), who shut out Southern 
6-0 last Thursday. 

"Funny thing is, I almost went 
there. My biggest statistical game 
came at East Mississippi was against 
Mississippi Delta in 2010. We were 
down 27-0 and we came back and 
beat them 42-27. I think I threw for 
502 yards that game and that's when 
I first talked to MVSU. I thought 
about it and considered it, and now 
I think it's pretty neat I get a chance 
to play them," he said. "It will be fun 
since I am from Mississippi. I am 
excited my Mom gets to come and it 
is always exciting to play the home- 
town team." 

In the other Southland award vot- 
ing by sports information directors 
announced Moday, McNeese State 
junior cornerback Guy Morgan was 
named the defensive player of the 
week while Central Arkansas senior 
receiver Dezmin Lewis was named 
the special teams player of the week. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Senior quarterback Brad Henderson drops back in the pocket. 
Henderson's perfromance against Nevada netted SLC honors 



Lady Demons shut out UAPB 
for second win of the weekend 



Brittany Russ 

Sauce Reporter 

Yanci Johnson and Ashlec 
Savona continued their hot 
streak Sunday afternoon 
helping the Northwestern State 
women's soccer team shutout Ar- 
kansas-Pine Bluff 5-0 in non-confer- 
ence action. 

Johnson scored her sixth goal of 
the season for the Lady Demons. 
(4-4) which is more than she scored 
her entire collegiate career. Savona 
scored her third goal on the young 
campaign which tied her 2010 and 
201 1 season highs. 

Arkansas-Pine Bluff's record fell 
to 1 -8 on the season. 

"We need to build on the success 
of this w eekend and use this as mo- 
mentum," George van Linder said. 

At the 34-minute mark, Johnson 
scored first on an assist from fresh- 
man Shelbv Balmer then tallied her 



own goal less than a minute later on 
a pass from Alex Rios to put NSU up 
2-0 at half. 

Rios scored an unassisted goal at 
the 54-minute mark before Savona 
took a pass from freshman Cassan- 
dra Briscoe and slipped it past the 
keeper for a goal. 

Freshman Peyton Rector put in the 
final goal with less than a minute re- 
maining on a pass from senior Ma- 
rissa Lees. 

"It was great to get a lot of contri- 
butions from different players today, 
and we're excited to have another 
shutout," said Van Linder. 
Brooke Bourbonaise and Jessica 
Danku teamed up for the teams third 
consecutive shutout due in large part 
to the NSU defense which allowed 
only three shots the entire match. 

The Lady Demons travel to Gram- 
bling on Friday for another non- 
conference match-up. Game time is 
slated for 3 p.m. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Yanci Johnson battles for the ball with a defender. Johnson has 
scored six goals this season. 




u rrent 



3l u ce 

Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, September 26, 2012 « Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 4 



Students, faculty find new building 'convenient' 



Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 

/\ t the cost of roughly S6.9 

^-million. Northwestern State 
University's new Student 
Service Center is providing 
students convenient service in a 
central location. 

The facility was funded by the 
State Capital Outlay. The Student 
Services Center opened June 18 
with 34,000 square feet. 

"It was a project that about 
started eight years ago," said 
Chuck Bourg director of Physical 
Plant Facilities, said. "The 
university wanted to have a place 
for the students to have a one- 
stop shop place." 

The Student Services Building 
is located near the intersection 
of Caspari Street and Sam Sibley 



Drive, the middle of campus. 

The building houses the 
Registrar, University Recruiting, 
Student Life and First Year 
Experience, Financial Aid, Dean 
of Students, Scholarships, and 
Veterans Affairs. 

Reatha Cox, Director of 
Student Life and First Year 
Experience, has a new office on 
the first floor. Before her new 
location, she was located in the 
Student Union and South Hall 
before that which Cox said "were 
all itty bitty places." 

Dr. Chris Maggio, Dean of 
Students and Provost for Student 
Life, believes the Student Service 
Center is in a better location 
because now students won't 
have to walk across campus for 
different offices. 

The new building has given 
Cox and her students room 




Submitted Photo 

The new Student Services Center opened for students last June. 



to expand and work on their 
multiple projects. She works with 
many students from organizations 



such as Freshman Connection. 

Sometimes students would 
have to work outside of the 



student union. 

"It gives our student 
leaders an opportunity to work 
somewhere other than out in 
the middle of the hall or in the 
middle of the floor," Cox said. 

"I think being in the center 
of the campus makes it easily 
accessible for students and the 
guests," Maggio said. "It brings a 
lot to our campus." 

The building had to go 
through several approvals before 
construction began. The Student 
Services building was built 
with the help of about 60 to 
80 employees from Monroe to 
Alexandria. 

"It was a good project," Bourg 
said. "The project is still going 
on with the second phase of the 
building right beside it." 

While building, Bourg 
faced some difficulties, but he 



considered them minor ones. 

Kerry Richman, sophomore 
business and administration 
major, believes the Student 
Services building is a good asset 
to the campus. 

Even though she hasn't visited 
the building, she knows where to 
go if she has any problems about 
financial aid or school related 
issues. 

"It 's a good location because 
it's by the Student Union and 
intersection," Richman said. "It's 
good they're located all in one 
place." 

JoAnna Bankston, a 
sophomore biology major, also 
agrees that the location of the 
building was a good choice. 

"I have visited it once," 
Bankston said. "It's closer, and 
we don't have to walk far. It's 
easy to tell people where it is." 



NSU named a Military Friendly School 



Camille Mosley 

Sauce Reporter 

_|~^ or the third time, 

Northwestern has been named 
a military friendly school by Victory 
Media. 

Victory Media's global media 
brands provide information that 
fits the needs of the military 
community. 

The 2013 Military Friendly 
Schools list praises the top 15 
percent of schools to ensure an 
education for military personnel and 
their families. 

Lt. Col. William Macky 
Underwood, professor of military 
science and ROTC Battalion 
Commander, was not surprised by 
NSU's ranking. 

"It's just basically confirmation 
of what we already knew," 
Underwood said. "We operate the 
ROTC program, of course, here 
at Natchitoches and at the campus 
there in Leesville." 

"Our instructor down there 
actually shares an office with the 
military liaison officer there in 



Leesville. We go down to Fort 
Polk every week and give briefings 
for every soldier and their family 
members. We go weekly to talk 
about scholarships, about programs 
that we have both at NSU and for 
the ROTC, so for us, this is just 
confirmation that we already knew 
that NSU was a military friendly 
institution for sure." 

The rigorous process to be 
considered for the title includes 
extensive research and an 
unyielding survey of more than 
12,000 VA-approved schools 
nationwide. The survey tabulation 
process, methodology and 
weightings that comprise the 2013 
list were independently verified by 
Ernst and Young, LLP. 

Each year, schools taking 
the survey are held to a higher 
standard than the previous year via 
improved methodology, criteria 
and weightings developed with the 
assistance of an Academic Advisory 
Board consisting of educators from 
schools across the country. 

Henry O'Dell. MS3 junior 
general studies and computer and 
natural science major, is studying 
for his masters in forensic biology. 



O'Dell thinks the recognition 
is good for the veterans and the 
school. 

"It's a big deal because there 
are a lot of veterans out there who 
are trying tc go back to school, so 
this is definitely a big deal that they 
are trying to help out and support 
veterans," O'Dell said. 

O'Dell, who was stationed 
at Fort Polk as an E5 medical 
commander said he chose NSU 
because it was an easy transition. 

"Fort Polk is only an hour away, 
so it was easy to come here and talk 
to the recruiters and get whatever 
paperwork I needed," O'Dell 
said. "They helped out a lot with 
the paperwork, they're nice to us, 
and they're kind enough to show 
us what to do. They got the ball 
rolling." 

O'Dell, who plans to go back 
to serving active duty after he 
graduates, thinks the ROTC 
program was a good opportunity for 
him. 

"This really gave me a chance 
to get my education, to better 
my education, and a lot of self- 
development," O'Dell said. 




Source: militaryfriendly school. com 
The 2013 list includes more than 1, 700 schools that represent the top tier of U.S. colleges, 
universities and trade schools that educate America's veterans. Over 12, 000 Victory Media 
approved schools vied for the title. These schools offer the appropriate services, programs, 
discounts, scholarships, networking and staff. This is the fourth year that "Gl Jobs Magazine" 
is releasing its Military Friendly Schools list. Visit militaryschools.com for the complete 2013 
list. 



Radiologic sciences students score high on certification exam 



Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

I I ow easy is it to obtain 

-^-perfection? Ask a student 
enrolled in NSU's radiologic science 
program. 

Graduating seniors have 
achieved a 100 percent pass rate on 
the American Registry of Radiology 
Technology Certification Exam. 

This percent pass rate on their 
national exam has been earned three 
times in four years. Successfully 



completing the exam is required 
in more than half of U.S. states to 
legally work as a radiographer. 

"The students achieved this 
feat with careful planning," Kelli 
Haynes, director of undergraduate 
studies of radiologic science and 
associate professor. 

In their final semester, students 
complete a registry review course 
for the actual exam. 

Also, students take mock 
registries each month to identify any 
weaknesses, and then a study plan is 
formed to help the student. 



In the 40 years since the first 
class of radiological science, then 
radiologic technology, graduated in 
1972, the program has seen many 
changes. 

"The curriculum has changed 
many times due to the profession's 
continual growth," Haynes said. 
"Things were once analog, but 
everything is now digital." 

Radiologic science is a fiield 
that continues to grow as other 
professional fields downsize, 
Haynes thinks this is an incentive 
for students to choose this major. 



"Radiologic science is a top 10 
profession along with nursing," 
Haynes said. "This area continues o 
evolve and due to that, more people 
are needed to meet the need. About 

99 percent of patients in hospitals 
are going to need x-rays and other 
exams as well." 

In 201 1, the job placement rate 
for radiologic science students was 

1 00 percent. Students are on track to 
match that rate. 

Although many universities 
offer a radiologic science program, 
Haynes identified factors that 



separate NSU from others. 

"First is NSU's reputation in 
the community," Haynes said. 
"Also, our entire faculty is master's 
prepared. Other programs cannot 
say that. We have support of the 
university [as well]." 

Haynes said the community for 
this program includes 22 clinical 
sites in Alexandria and Shreveport, 
where students complete hands-on 
training. Natchitoches does not 
have a site because the city only has 
one hospital. 

The program is primarily housed 



in Shreveport and Alexandria, 
although students may complete 
the first three semesters of course 
work at the Natchitoches campus. 
Students who prefer this option 
maintain contact with Shreveport 
campus faculty through question 
and answer sessions. 

During the fall semesters, 
Shreveport campus faculty are at 
the Natchitoches campus every 
Tuesday. 

For more information on the 
radiologic science program, log onto 
www.radiologicscience.nsula.edu. 



Index 1 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Sunday 


Monday 


Tuesday 


2 Life 


77760° 


71758° 


64/56° 


68755° 


70754° 


70755° 


73756° 


3 Opinions 












A ^t%t- , ■ :% 




4 Sports 



















Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
September 26, 2012 



Move over Facebook: Got OrgSync? 



Contessa Wills 

Staff Writer 

Are you a registered user of 
OrgSync? Do you know 
what it is? 

OrgSync is a campus com- 
munity website that assists in the 
certification and management of 
all RSO's. 

Basically, OrgSync is a social 
media platform — similar to Face- 
book, Twitter, Linkedln or Yam- 
mer — for campus organizations. 

Yonna Pasch, director of stu- 
dent activities, organizations and 
leadership development, notes that 
although OrgSync is a social me- 
dia network it is more beneficial to 
students than the others. 

"OrgSync is not just for event 
promotion," Pasch said. 

"It has more than 65 features 
including an e-portfolio and cre- 
ates a co-curricular transcript for 
students. Also, it has a complete 
list of RSO's for students who 
wish to be involved." 

OrgSync is authenticated and 



protected by the server at North- 
western State University unlike 
other social media sites. 

Pasch said the university began 
using OrgSync primarily to better 
communicate with organizations 
and certify organizations. 

Because organizations must be 
certified annually, OrgSync makes 
this process quicker and more 
efficient. Also, this new digital 
approach allows the university to 
be green. 

Users create a one-page profile 
containing all of their basic infor- 
mation. 

They are then able to search for 
organizations that they may be in- 
terested in joining, receive updates 
on organizations and communicate 
with fellow students. 

The process of joining an 
organization through this site is as 
simple as submitting one's reasons 
for desiring to join. 

In most cases an administra- 
tor's approval is required to join. 
The potential member will be noti- 
fied of their acceptance. 



Community Home 




WHO'SWHO 



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Submitted Photo 

The NSU home page of OrgSync students see when they log onto the site, featuring community 
news and events. 



According to Raven Maxile, 
Student Gvernment Association 
vice President, OrgSync is a good 
source of communication and 



helps students, particularly the tain a record of all of your campus 

resume builder. involvement," Maxile said. 

"You can link your websites for Randa Lopez, president of 

employers to view and also main- NSU's debate team, commented 



on the pros and cons to using the 
site. 

"For larger organizations, it is 
helpful," Lopez said. "The site has 
lots of features. You can keep all 
of the organization's information 
in one place and take polls. [How - 
ever], for smaller organizations, 
it would be easier to text three 
people rather than logging in and 
sending out an e-mail." 

According to Lopez, OrgSync 
is a more professional network 
for organizations than other social 
media platforms such as Face- 
book. 

As of last week NSU had 2,321 
individual users and 128 organiza- 
tions registered on OrgSync. 

Special interest groups consti- 
tute 44.2 percent of users. Sorori- 
ties and fraternities are the second 
largest group at 1 9.4 percent, 
followed by honor societies at 9.3 
percent and faith-based groups at 
7 percent. 

For more information on 
OrgSync, please visit www.nsula. 
orgsync.com. 



'Cancer sucks' 

Up 'Til Dawn hosts awareness week 



Jessica Blow 

Staff Writer 

Up 'Til Dawn's, also known 
as UTP, annual cancer 
awareness week is being 
held this week, Sept. 24-27. 
"UTP is a collegiate fundraising 
program for St. Jude Research 
Hospitals," Michael Stephenson, 
executive director of UTP, said. 
"It has participated in over 100 
campuses cross the United States." 

According to Stephenson, UPT 
originated from a letter writing 
campaign where students and 
facilities stayed up until dawn to 
write letters to their family and 
friends to help raise money for St. 
Jude. The events held this week 
are also to help raise money and 
awareness. 

"This year it's more geared 
towards awareness," Stephenson 
said. Because Stephenson thinks 
some events are overdone, 
like Chunk your Change, the 
preparation for UTP's cancer 



awareness week began early 
summer. 

"I always find it hard to come up 
with something different especially 
on this campus," Stephenson said. 
"It's so small." 

It was hard to come up with 
the events, but everyone who was 
involved was willing to cooperate. 

Stephenson said he has a good 
feeling about this series of events. 

It's not only cancer awareness 
week for the campus, but it also for 
the city of Natchitoches. 

"I always like to tie it to the 
community," Stephenson said. This 
year to connect with community, he 
contacted Orange Leaf. 

Acoording to Stephenson by 
the end of Monday night, UTP will 
collect 20 percent of Orange Leaf 
earnings made that day. 

Stephenson favorite event of the 
week is the unveiling of this year's 
UTP theme. Trying not to reveal his 
theme, the only clue he was able to 
give was Yellow. 

"I'm excited about it," he said, 



even though, he feels the theme 
doesn't top last year's theme. 

"We have raised $88,000 so 
far, since we started on campus," 
Stephenson said. 

This year he is raising the bar and 
hopes to raise $100,000. 

"I'm a cancer survivor," Britney 
Murphy said. 

Murphy is a general studies 
major and social science minor 
graduating senior. This is her first 
time participating in UTP's cancer 
awareness week. 

"I support Up 'Til Dawn 
because they help St. Jude and 
support children and families 
who are dealing with cancer." 
Murphy said. "I support St. Jude 
tremendously." 

Murphy said she also supports 
UTP because it gives the campus a 
chance to get involved for a good 
cause. 

The unveiling of UTP's 2012- 
2013 theme will be held at the Rock 
on campus at 6:30 p.m. 



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Are alternative lifestyles the new normal? 



What does 
the 
phrase 



£3k 

ob I abutka 



Jacol 

Style Columnist 




"alternative 
lifestyle" 
mean to 
you? Many 
use these 

words to negatively associate 
what is different from the 
cultural norm (especially 
ultra-conservative politicians 
condemning same-sex 
marriage). 

However, what has been 
deemed an alternative lifestyle 
has not been consistent 
throughout history. 

At the beginning of the 
previous century, women who 
fought for the right to vote or 
even cut their hair and skirts 
short were part of the alternative 
lifestyle. This is hardly the case 
today. 

The same held true for 
African-Americans who were 
a century ago identified as 
alternative to White America. 
With the influence of popular 
opinion and new laws, the 



equitable embracement of 
different races became a cultural 
norm. 

Over the last few decades, 
individuals who identified as 
anything other than heterosexual 
have been grouped together as 
an alternative lifestyle. 

This became less true in the 
2 1 st century as we became more 
open about our sexual identities. 
However, as stated before, some 
still call a preference that's not 
heterosexual as alternative, 
giving it a negative connotation. 

Many individuals in 
the LGBT community 
have responded to this by 
accepting and celebrating the 
alternativeness of their lifestyles. 

For example, a Natchitoches 
called Alternative Lifestyle 
Night began Monday night 
of this week at Ron's Bikini 
Lounge and, if successful, will 
continue every Monday night 
from 9 p.m. until close. 

What's more alternative than 
watching kings and queens of 
drag fabulously walk the stage at 
the stroke of midnight? 

"Alternative lifestyle to me is 




Submitted Photo 

RuPaul, an actor, model, author and widely known drag queen. 



contemporary conditions, they 
are already beginning to become 
part of the norm. 

In retrospect, one 
must realize that the term 
"alternative" is relative to 
what is normal. And there is a 
diversity of lifestyles for them to 
either be normal or not normal. 

We should embrace the 
variety of lifestyles and 
characteristics that constitute our 
identities (whether we consider 
sexual orientation, gender, 
ethnicity or anything else). 

Maybe a person with an 
alternative lifestyle is someone 
who rejects the undeniable 
diversity in our culture and 
strives to be normal. 



anyone gay, straight, lesbian or 
transgender who doesn't fit into 
the traditional American lifestyle 
be it sexual orientation, style or 
belief, sophomore Jake Revolt, 
one of the hosts of Alternative 
Lifestyle Night, said. 

"My hopes for Alternative 
Lifestyle Night are that everyone 



comes out and has a blast while 
supporting their community. I'm 
hoping that this gives the people 
a safe place to go to just be 
themselves," Revolt said. 

Will the alternative lifestyles 
of today become part of the 
social norm? 

According to history and 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

"Trouble with the Curve" 

Rated PG-13 

4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"House at the 
End of the Street" 

Rated PG-13 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

"Finding Nemo 3D" 

Rated G 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 



Mayfield OFFICE SUPPLY 



Phone: 
318.3*7.00*4 

318.3*7.0063 

810 Keyser Ave. 
Natchitoches 





Everyone deserves 
a chance to fly: A 
review of 'Wicked' 




cat 



pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
beverly@yahoo.com 
September 26, 2012 



Winnie Holzman's "Wicked 
is the best Broadway 
musical to ever 
grace this earth. I have seen 
many musicals ranging 
from "The Phantom of 
the Opera" to "Rent" to 
"Sweeny Todd: The Demon 
Barber of Fleet Street." 




plans for Oz. Elpheba learns the 
truth about herself and the wizard s 
intentions, while Galinda is 
dubbed the Good Witch of 
the North. 

The Broadway 
show includes popular 
songs such as "Defying 
Gravity." "Popular." and 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 

Adviser 

Ty Johnson 

News Editor 

Alexis Reliford 

Life Editor 

Jimmie Walker 

Sports Editor 

Catherine Beverly 

Opinions Editor 




The, 

urrent 

aucj 

Kirstie White 

Copy Editor 

Jacob Labutka 

Lifestyle Columnist 

Andrea Nederostova 

Sauce Reporter 

Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Chris Degeyter 

Sauce Reporter 

Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 

JC Bryant 

Social Media 

Camille Mosley 

Freshman Scholar 

Taylor Furr 

Delivery Personnel 

Office phone 
318-357-5456 



All of these have paled in Camille Mosley "Loathing." just to name 
comparison. Freshman Scholar a few. 



"Wicked" has been 
critically acclaimed all over the 
world and it has perfect reason 
to be. It is based on a novel by 
Gregory Maguire and follows the 
tale of the witches of Oz. There are 
two main witches that are thrown 
together by the twisted luck of fate. 

Elpheba. the future Wicked 
Witch of the West, goes off to 
college at Shiz to be roomed with 
the future Good Witch of the North. 
Galinda. Elpheba is instantly cast 
off as an outcast because of her 
obvious green skin, while Galinda 
enjoys the title of martyrdom for 
rooming with the green chick. 

The witches overcome their 
differences and travel to the 
Emerald City to meet the Wizard of 
Oz. In Emerald City the duo learns 
the truth about the wizard and his 



"Defying Gravity" 
even made its television day-view 
on an episode of Glee. It was 
performed by Rachel and Kurt in 
order to settle a singing role dispute. 

Each song represents a pivotal 
point in the musical that will forever 
be ingrained into one's brain. I 
remember the first time I saw 
"Wicked." The images of "Defying 
Gravity" are etched into my mind. I 
remember the gorgeous harmonies 
by each actress along with the 
stunning special effects. 

Everyone and their mom should 
at least see "Wicked" once in their 
lifetime. "Wicked" will performed 
in New Orleans in the Mahalia 
Jackson Theater in the spring. 
Experience the magic for yourself 
and learn the real truth behind "The 
Wizard of Oz." 



Natchitoches isn't a college friendly environment 



Natchitoches is a well-known 
travel location and people 
come from across the globe 
to visit, but is it really a college- 
friendly environment? 
There are a few major 
complaints that students 
have voiced over the 
years, many of which are 
specific to the city. 

No. l:The 
restaurants of 
Natchitoches are limited 
to Mexican, Chinese 
(although the pickings are slim in 
that regard). Japanese (Hana's) and 
then the basic American options like 
Chili's. 

Restaurants are important to 
college students as a hangout and 
as a way to experience variety 
in an otherwise dull life. Baton 
Rouge and Lafayette have more 
Chinese and Mediterranean options, 
something that can improve the 
bland palette of Natchitoches. 




Catherine Beverly 

Opinions Editor 



Even in regard to our fast food 
there are few options outside of 
McDonald's and Burger King. 
Restaurant giants such Jack in the 
Box, Rally's, and Five 
Guys are nowhere to be 
seen in the city. 

No. 2: Another major 
problem in Natchitoches 
is the lack of the basic 
requirements for a 
pedestrian and biker 
friendly environment. 
There are no sidewalks 
for those who would like to 
have a healthier experience in 
Natchitoches, and there is little 
patience for bikers or pedestrians on 
the winding roads downtown. 

This is one of the major reasons I 
drive my car everywhere. Although 
I love biking. I would never feel 
safe riding down Fairgrounds Road. 
I know how I am as a driver, and 
you just do not expect someone to 
zip out of nowhere in front of your 



car. That leads to the third problem. 

No. 3: Traffic in Natchitoches is 
repugnant! If you are trying to drive 
across town during lunch or after 
work, there is no hope for you. It 
will most definitely take longer than 
you thought because there are so 
many people and such an inefficient 
traffic system. 

In the end, we're actually like 
many other college towns. We 
have things for students to do, to 
an extent, but it's limited to those 
with money. Despite that, our movie 
theatre, now showing pictures in 
3D, cannot hold a candle to the 
malls and bookstores of Baton 
Rouge. 

I understand that Natchitoches 
is limited by its bank account, but 
there is some gain in improving 
the student environment. Historic 
is nice for visitors, but we need to 
remember the people who live here 
full-time: residents and students. 



Super Crossword 



HOOFERS 



ACROSS 

1 Martin 

Sheen, to 

Emilio 

Estevez 
4 Photo tint 
9 Pipe part 
13 TV's The 

— of Life" 
18 Baal or 

Elvis 

20 Bonus 

21 Soccer 
superstar 

22 Cold sound 

23 Dancing 
president? 

25 Landed 

26 Range rope 

27 — a 
customer 

28 Whip 
30 Tranquil 

32 —4 (Toyota 
model) 

33 Little lumps 
36 Fawning 

39 Parisian 
pronoun 

40 Dancing 
colonist? 

43 Go Fish 
and golf 

45 Comic 
DeLuise 

48 Muse with a 
scroll 

49 Command 
to a corgi 

50 Meyerbeer's 

Huguenots" 

51 Prospector s 
prize 



52 "The 
Twelve — " 
( 70 film) 

54 At once 

56 Freezin' 
season 

59 Finger food 

61 Trickles 

63 Short story 

65 Cognizant 

67 In the 
manner of 

68 Bare 

69 Start to 
snooze 

70 Viva — 
72 Dancing 

comic? 
76 "— of Gold" 
('70 hit) 

77 Gray 
matter? 

78 Northwestern 
St ' 

80 Philips of 
"UHF" 

81 Tonto's 
horse 

84 More 

disreputable 
86 Director 

Lang 
88 Flusters 

91 Percussion 
instrument 

92 Feel awful 
94 Bean 

96 Make Ched- 
dar better 

97 Prohibit 

98 Wine vessel 

100 Yuletide 

101 Piglet's 
parent 



102 Hunt or 

Hayes 
104 Dancing 

boxer? 

108 Kid at 
court 

109 Hailing from 
Hunan 

111 Mention 
briefly 

115 Aussie 
walker 

116 Space 

117 Assistance 

120 Spanish 
guitarist 

121 "Crazy- 
singer 

123 Widespread 
126 Dancing 
cartoonist? 

129 Neighbor of 
Somalia 

130 Singer 
Phoebe 

131 Entertain 

132 Sour fruit 

133 Novelist 
Danielle 

134 Bronte 
heroine 

135 Aden's 
locale 

136 Minnesota 
twins? 

DOWN 

1 Mustard 
type 

2 Hersey 
setting 

3 Like the 
Taj Mahal 

4 Use a straw 



5 Word form 
for "environ- 
ment" 

6 It may be 
bitter 

7 "— Dinka 
Doo" ('33 
song) 

8 '92 
Wimbledon 
winner 

9 Health 
resort 

10 — Aviv 

11 Draw forth 

12 Copper or 
cobalt 

13 "Green 
Acres" 
setting 

14"Stroker — • 
('83 film) 

1 5 Dancing 
body- 
builder? 

16 Wrecks the 
Rolls 

17 Italian wine 
19 Abate 

24 Seafood 
selection 
29 Coop crowd 
31 Pantyhose 
part 

34 Rembrandt 
or Whistler 

35 Ward of 
"Sisters" 

37 Wreckage 

38 Reject 

39 Touch up 
the text 

41 Journalist 
Jacob 



42 Jeanne of 
"Jules and 
Jim" 

44 Mrs. 
Kramden 

45 Bandleader 
Severinsen 

46 ". . . man — 
mouse?" 

47 Dancing 
statesman? 

52 Numbers 
pro 

53 Push a 
product 

55 Trick stick 

56 Tie the knot 

57 Thames 
town 

58 Funnyman 
Foxx 

60 Veneration 
62 Less vivid 
64 Van — , CA 
66 Piece of 
fencing? 

70 Enormous 

71 European 
capital 

73 Akbar's city 

74 "— the 
Mood for 
Love* ('35 
song) 

75 "— bet!" 

76 Sprout 

78 It's up in 
the air 

79 Volcano 
part 

82 Peruvian 
port 

83 Keats 
composition 



85 Dickens title 
start 

86 Peel off 

87 Move like 
mad 

89 Sell-esteem 

90 Make a 
muumuu 

93 Psychologist 

Pavlov 
95 Obligation 
99 TV host 

John 

102 Village 

103 Sgt. or cpl. 

104 Disney 
cricket 

105 Margin 

106 Mallard or 
teal 

107 Suffers 

108 Acts like a 
chicken 

110 Neighsayer? 

112 Actress 
Berry 

113 Synthetic 
textile 

114 "The 
Highway- 
man" poet 

116 Genuine 

118 Fancy fabric 

119 Horner's 
fruit 

1 22 Carrie or 
Louis 

124 On behalf of 

125 Ovine 
female 

127 Poetic 
monogram 

128 — 
Buddhism 



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AMBER WAVES « - r/*** 



OWEN, I AM FORTIF/INS MY TROOPS. 
A STANDARD MILITARY TACTIC FOR 
SOLDIERS SO THEIR LEADER CAN SO 
^ INSIDE AND EAT HIS FISHSTICK5. 




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mama's eoyz 



www.mamasboyz.com JERRY -CRAFT 





We need writers! 

Our newspaper 
needs stories 
written by students. 
Come by our office, 
227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join. 





Meetings every 
Monday at 6:50 
p.m. We hope to 
hear from you! 

- Current Sauce 
staff 




Trivia 

t6St byfifi I 

Rodriguez 



1. FOOD & DRINK: What is French 
"pate de foie gras" made from? 

2. GEOGRAPHY: The island of 
Madagascar lies in what body of 
water? 

3. LANGUAGE: What is a similar 
way to describe a "ribald" joke? 

4. AD SLOGANS: What movie was 
promoted with the slogan. "Just when 
you thought it was safe to go back in 
the water"? 

5. HUMAN ANATOMY: What is the 
most common type of blood? 

6. POLITICS: What longtime Ohio 
senator was known as "Mr. Republi- 
can"? 

,7. LITERARY: What famous author 
used the pen name "Boz" in his early 
career? 

8. MOVIES: Which three actors 
have starred in major roles as Inspec- 
tor Clouseau in the Pink Panther mov- 
ies? 

9. CHEMISTRY: What does the 
"Ag" stand for in the chemical symbol 
for silver? 

10. HISTORY: When did Queen 
Anne's War (Third Indian War) begin 
in colonial America? 



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BUTTR1JE 

By Samantha Weaver 

• It's still not known who made the 
following sage observation: "To suc- 
ceed in politics, it is sometimes nec- 
essary to rise above your principles." 

• It was beloved American poet 
Robert Frost who made the following 
sage observation: "A bank is a place 
where they lend you an umbrella in 
fair weather and ask for it back when 
it begins to rain." 

• In 1938, Time magazine featured 
Adolph Hitler on the cover as its Man 
of the Year. 

• The first time a toilet was ever seen 
on television was in the pilot episode 
of "Leave It to Beaver," in 1957. 

• The most common name in the 
world is Muhammed. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
September 26, 2012 



Demons destroy Delta Devils, 45-14 



Chris Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

The Demons dominated the 
Mississippi Valley State Delta 
Devils this Saturday at Turpin 
Stadium, 45-14. 

Bouncing back from a narrow loss 
in Nevada to the Nevada WolfPack, 
the Demon football team is now 2-2 
while Mississippi Valley State drops 
to 1-3. 

The Demons unleashed an of- 
fensive torrent on the Delta Devils, 
with 161 total yards on the ground 
and 1 69 yards through the air. 

The explosive running attack was 
led by Junior running back Rumeall 
Morris, who rushed for 69 yards 
with one touchdown on five carries. 

He was also able to show off his 
throwing ability on a trick play that 
resulted in Morris throwing a 42- 
yard pass down the field. 

Morris said the coaches' stress 
on finishing the game strong is what 
helped the Demons win in the end. 
Morris was aided in the Demons' 
ground attack by six other runners 
in the game, showing off the team's 
deep roster and talent. 

"They all do different things, and 
we try to get our package to where 
our guys will do best," Demon assis- 
tant coach and offensive coordinator 
Todd Cooley said. "We try to set it 
by what they do." 

Senior quarterback Brad Hender- 
son had a spectacular game as well, 
completing 19 passes on 25 attempts 
for 127 yards. Henderson threw 
three touchdown passes in the game 
with no interceptions and was only 




Receiver Phillip Harvey takes a kick off to the endzone. He was hit illegally earlier in the game when he tried to fair catch the ball. 



sacked twice for a total loss of only 
seven yards. 

And the Demons' offensive on- 
slaught even carried over into special 
teams. Senior wide receiver Phillip 
Harvey returned a kickoff from the 
Demons' 3-yard line for the longest 
kickoff return touchdown in Demon 
history since 1970, and the third lon- 
gest Demon return of all time. 

Defensively, the Demons only al- 



lowed a single offensive touchdown 
all game, and held the Delta Devils 
to 241 total offensive yards in the 
process. 

The Delta Devils' other touch- 
down came early in the first quar- 
ter on a 23-yard returned fumble 
by Henderson. However, according 
to senior safety Jamaal White, that 
touchdown is what sparked Harvey's 
kickoff return touchdown, which 



came immediately after the fumble 
return touchdown. 

"It wasn't beautiful, but it was 
a great win. I thought we won the 
game in all three phases." Demon 
head coach Bradley Peveto said. 
"Do we have some things to clean 
up? Yes we do, but it's a win. We'll 
take it. It's a good win for our foot- 
ball team." 

This Saturday the Demons head to 



Lake Charles to take on the Mc- 
Neese State Cowboys to start South- 
land Conference play. 

The Cowboys are 3-1 as the De- 
mons head to Lake Charles, and are 
coming off of a shocking upset by 
the Southeastern State University 
Lions. 

The Demons are looking to take 
the momentum from this win and 
crush the demoralized Cowboys to 
start conference play with a victory. 



Upcoming Games 




Southland Conference 

vs.McNeese Sept.29 



vs. Lamar 

vs. Southeastern 
vs. Nicholls 
vs.UCA 
vs. Sam Houston Nqv qn 

vs Stephen F. Nov. 1 7 



Oct. 6 

Oct. 13 
Oct. 27 

Nov. 3 



"bold denotes home games 



mm 




Lady Demons volleyball off to record breaking start 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Keelie Arneson stops a score from the opposing team. She is the SLC Defensive Player of the Week. 



Courtesy of Sports Info 

With an overall record of 
J 1 7 5 and a Southland Con- 
• • - ference record of 3-1, the 
Northwestern State volleyball team 
is off to the best start in the program's 
Division I history heading into a pair 
of important home matches Thurs- 
day and Saturday. 

"It is hard to describe what this 
improvement means as a coach," 
said NSU co-head coach Hugh 
Hernesman "It is great for our vol- 
leyball program and it is great for the 
athletic department because I think it 
shows that we can get it done here." 

The Lady Demons are coming 
off an outstanding week when they 
took down conference foes Texas 
A&M-Corpus Christi, Lamar and 
McNeese State. They will face the 
two preseason favorites for the 2012 
conference title. Central Arkansas 
Thursday night at 7 and newcomer 
Oral Roberts Saturday at 2 in Prather 
Coliseum. 

Last Thursday's win over Lamar 
marked NSU's first victory over the 
Lady Cardinals since 2005 and their 
defeat of McNeese last Saturday put 
their winning streak at five matches. 
The records overall and in South- 
land play are the program's best at 
this stage of the season since North- 
western became an NCAA Division I 
school in 1977. 

"Something that I*ve learned is 
not to look too far ahead and not to 
start counting wins," said Hernes- 
man. "It's too hard to tell how vari- 
ous factors will play out so we just 
try to focus on each match. 



Starting five sophomores and two 
freshmen, the Lady Demons are cur- 
rently tied with Central Arkansas 
for second place in the conference 
standings. They trail Stephen F. Aus- 
tin by one win. SFA handed North- 
western its lone conference loss. 

"I think this is a huge season for 
us," said NSU sophomore Tamara 
Hanna ."Last year we were so young 
with nine freshmen and I think that 
we really gained a lot of experience 
because we had to mature as volley- 
ball players pretty quickly." 
Hernesman also attributes much of 
the team's success to a more devel- 
oped maturity and consistency. 

"Last year we felt that, with such 
a young group, there would be a lot 
of inconsistency and there was. This 
year we are a lot more consistent. 

"Our experienced players con- 
tinue to improve and the new faces, 
more specifically Glynna Johnson, 
Amanda Kunz and Caiti O'Connell 
have allowed us to play with more 
size and more physicality." 

O'Connell led the Lady Demons 
in their last three matches, register- 
ing 43 kills overall, 19 of which 
came in NSU's five-set stunner 
against Lamar. 

Southland Conference Defensive 
Player of the Week Keelie Arne- 
son has also helped set the pace for 
Northwestern State. Arneson has 
dug up 285 balls so far this season, 
including a season-high 29 against 
Lamar. 

The team has players ranked in the 
top 1 in the Southland in five out of 
six categories including hitting per- 



centage, kills, assists, digs and aces. 
Johnson is currently eighth in hitting 
percentage at .308 and Emily Sweet 
stands at sixth for assists per set at 
9.76: 

Stacey DiFrancesco and Mack- 
enzie Neely rank fourth and seventh 
for average kills with 3.23 and 2.91 
per set, respectively. 
Arneson, Neely and DiFrancesco 
have all had impressive serving per- 
formances, ranking fifth (0.42/set), 
seventh (0.36/set) and 10th (0.33/ 
set) in average aces. 
Arneson also ranks second for digs, 
averaging 4.83 per set. 

"I really think a lot of our success 
so far has to do with Coach Hugh 
and Coach Steph (Hernesman, co- 
head coach) reminding us to keep a 
vision," said Hanna. "It's great to see 
all of our hard work pay off so far. 
We are really focused on getting to 
the conference tournament and suc- 
ceeding there." 

"This year has been incredible so 
far," said Lady Demon junior Jessica 
Guttierrez. 

"That we have been able to 
achieve this just shows what the pro- 
gram is really capable of and where 
it is going." 

NSU hopes to continue the hot 
streak as they take on the top two 
conference preseason favorites later 
this week. 

"The Southland Conference has 
become very competitive in the past 
few years," said Hernesman. "We 
have started off really strong but 
there are still a lot of matches left to 
be played." 



Upcoming Games 



vs. UCA Sept.27 
vs.Oral RobertsSept.29 
vs. Corpus Christi Oct. 4 
vs. Sam Houston Oct. 6 
vs. Southeastern Oct. 1 1 
vs. Nicholls Oct. 13 
vs. Lamar Oct. 18 



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Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, October 10, 2012 « Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nwicurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 5 



KNWD kicks off semester with new DJs, new equipment 



Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 

KNWD the Demon is 
back on air with a new 
transmitter, new directors 
and new DJs. 

Most of the prev ious semester 
the radio station was off-air due 
to lack of equipment, but this 
new semester comes with new 
equipment, new radio artists and 
new management including general 
manager Tara Luck. 

In addition to the hosts and 
street team, there have been 
several other new positions filled 
at KNWD: Richard Sharp, public 
relations manager; Dillon Roy, 
programming director; Matt 
Dean, music director; Taylor Furr, 
promotional director. 



With over 30 new DJs and 23 
new shows going on air this month, 
Luck, a fifth year liberal arts major, 
has had her hands full getting 
everything up and running. The new 
shows cov er rock, hip-hop, top 40, 
indie, world music and more. 
Luck took it on herself to train all 
40 prospective radio hosts earlier 
this month. 

""I felt like it was my 
responsibility to train the students 
because they are the voice of 
KNWD," Luck said. "Training is 
really good. I took radio artists 
in small groups and walked them 
through how to do simple processes 
on the sound board." 

Luck still has a few more plans 
in store for KNWD stating that her 
goal was to have every hour from 
8am to 6 pm full of DJ's. Online 
streaming is also planned for the 




Submitted Photo 
There will be 30 new DJs and 23 new shows to air this month. 



spring semester as well as getting 
KNWD onto radio applications 
such as iHeartRadio. 

Any students who may have 



missed their chance to become part 
of the KNWD can still participate. 

"Even if there is no room for the 
show they can apply next semester, 



and there is a street team," Luck 
said. "They help promote." 

Anyone who has turned on 
91.7 has most likely heard one of 
Furr's many ads that have been 
running recently. Furr's work as 
promotional director includes 
creating the station liners and his 
personal adds and handling all 
audio advertising. 

Any other advertising such as 
public events and social media goes 
to Richard Sharp in public relations. 
Furr has created at least 23 different 
commercials and has several more 
planned out. 

Furr doesn't set aside time for 
planning. He just works with what 
enters his mind. 

"Aww to heck with it. I'll just try it 
and see how it goes," Furr said. 
Furr also doubles as one of the 



radio hosts at KNWD. As early 
as last semester he was running a 
show titled "Game Tracks," where 
he plays sound tracks from a large 
collection of different video games. 
Furr went off air because of the 
transmitter. 

Despite the new transmitter he 
has not returned due to the station 
only being able to broadcast in 
mono, which decreases the quality 
of his mainly orchestral songs. 
When they are able to broadcast 
in stereo Furr plans to bring back 
"Game Tracks." 

Most shows should begin airing 
before the end of the month. A 
schedule of shows will be put up 
in the first floor of Kyser and on 
KNWD's Facebook page. 

Be sure to tune into KNWD the 
Demon on 91.7 FM. 



Students elect the 2012 Homecoming Court 

Names of new SGA freshman senators, SAB representatives are released 



Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

\ j ast Thursday NSU students 
voted for SAB Representa- 
tives, Freshman Class Senators, 
Homecoming Court, and Mr. & 
Miss NSU. 

Kiley Louviere and Afton 
Owens have the honor of being 
crowned King and Queen of the 
Court. There will be a second elec- 
tion for Mr. & Miss NSU due to an 
appeal. 

Elections were conducted on- 
line, but in the past students had 
submitted paper ballots. By taking 
a digital approach, the university 
was able to calculate votes quicker 
and more efficiently. Also, the uni- 
versity was able to uphold its green 
initiative. 

Damian Glover, a freshman 
secondary education major, is one 
of 14 students to be elected to the 
Student Activities Board. SAB is 
responsible for providing enter- 
taining programs for students at 
NSU. 

Glover wanted to be a member 
of SAB to give back to NSU and 
start making a name for himself 
among the Natchitoches commu- 
nity. A member of Helping Hands 
and Up 'til Dawn, Glover encour- 
ages all students to become in- 
volved in at least one organization 



during their college career. 
In addition to building one's re- 
sume, being a student leader pro- 
vides "great people skills, teaches 
patience, leadership and how to 
work with a team," Glover said. 

As a member of SAB Glover 
hopes to become a better leader 
and meet new people. Currently, 
SAB has a total of five standing 
committees that students can join 
which are Freshman Connector, 
Lady of the Bracelet, Lagniappe, 
Public Relations & Advertising 
and Service Learning. 

Victoria Hippler, a junior, 
was nominated to the Homecom- 
ing Honor Court. She thinks that 
it is an honor and humbling to be 
nominated to be nominated by her 
peers, especially among those who 
she has admired since coming to 
NSU. 

"Being a part of so many or- 
ganizations allows me to meet so 
many people," Hippler said. "Be- 
ing nominated proves that hard 
work does pay off." 

Hippler believes that Afton Ow- 
ens possess all of the qualities that 
Homecoming Queen should have. 
"Our Homecoming Queen should 
be outgoing and a good represen- 
tation of Northwestern," Hippler 
said. "She should be the ideal 
woman. That is Afton." 




Election Results 



Homecoming 
Female Court 

Afton Owens 



Anna Gasperecz 
Ashley Haynes 
Victoria Hippler 
Brittany Jeanio 
Danielle Landry 
essica Ratelle 
Tori Sanford 
Brandi Vincent 
Lauren Waguespao 
Robin Wilder 







Homecoming 
Male Court 

Demarcus Horton 
Derrick Houston 
CJ Johnson 
Kelly Louviere 
'omon Matthews 
Austin McCann 
Ryan Owens 
Kiley Louviere 
Jake Bryan 
Darrell Favis 




. Freshmai 
Class Senators 

Chantasia Grey 
Bria Williams 1 





SAB Representatives 

Sarah Baggett 
Rachel Belton 
Paxton Britt f 
Jasmine Brown 
Warren "Drew" Crawford 
Damian Glover 
Robert Guidry 
Jalicia Hamilton 
Courtney Matthews 
Leanny Munoi 
Katlyn Peavy 
Ashley Perkins 
Hailey Warner 
Cody Whitaker 




Due to an appeal, there will be another Mr. and Miss NSU election to be held at a later date. 



National News 




Race lightening up in Ohio: 

According to a CNN/ORC International 
poll (PDF), 5 1 percent of likely voters 
in Ohio say they're backing President 
Barack Obama, with 47 percent supporting 
Republican nominee Mitt Romney. Obama 's 
four-point advantage is within the poll's 
sampling error. 

Florida man falls dead after winning 
roaching-eating contest: 

A 32-year-old man downed dozens of 
roaches and worms to win a python at a 
Florida reptile store, then collapsed and died 
outside minutes later. 
Youtube moves to be Web's cable 
provider: 

Last October. YouTube announced 1 00 new 
channels, featuring everything including- 
sports, comedy and educational videos. On 
Monday, it announced plans for another 40, 
with an international bent that includes chan- 
nels from France, Germany and the United 
Kingdom. 
7 days as meningitis outbreak grows: 
The total number of cases has also grown to 
64 people in nine states, the CDC said. That 
is 1 7 more cases and two more states than 

the day before. 
Connecticut teacher mistakenly kills son 

after neighbor reports robber: 
A Connecticut grade-school teacher acciden- 
tally shot his 1 5-year-oid son during what 
he apparently thought was the attempted 
robbery of a neighbor's house, police said 
Friday. 



School of Business to host 46th Annual J. Walter Poster 



Courtesy of News Bureau 

Northwestern State Uni- 
versity's School of Busi- 
ness will sponsor the 
46th annual J. Walter Porter 
Forum Thursday, Oct. 11. The 
focus of this year's program is 
"Economic and Community De- 
velopment" with discussions on 
how government officials and 



business professionals promote 
civic engagement, cultivate en- 
trepreneurship and support a 
healthy city, state and region. 

Featured speakers will be 
Donna Isaacs, Hyram Copeland 
and Tony Davis. The Porter Fo- 
rum will begin at 8:15 a.m. in 
Room 107 of Russell Hall and 
will conclude with a luncheon at 
1 1:45 a.m. 

Isaacs is president of Coco- 



Green, a consulting firm dedi- 
cated to community education, 
advocacy and rehabilitation with 
a focus on improving the health 
and well-being of residents while 
saving money. She will speak at 
8:30 a.m. Copeland has served as 
mayor of Vidalia since 1992 and 
is past president of the Louisiana 
Municipal Gas Authority. 

He has served on the Gov- 
ernor's Economic Development 



Task Force and numerous plan- 
ning and development commis- 
sions. He will speak at 9:30 a.m. 

Davis is executive director 
of the Natchitoches Area Cham- 
ber of Commerce, a real estate 
broker and licensed residential 
contractor. He serves on sever- 
al local civic and philanthropic 
boards, including the board of 
directors for the Louisiana As- 
sociation of Chamber of Com- 



merce Executives. He will speak 
at 1 1 a.m. 

The J. Walter Porter forum 
is an effort to translate the text- 
book into practice by bringing 
capable, successful business 
executives to campus to speak 
on selected topics in their area 
of expertise. The forum is made 
possible by the endowment es- 
tablished by the family and 
friends of the late J. Walter Por- 



ter. Porter was interested in im- 
proving the image of business 
as a career field for college stu- 
dents. 

For more information, con- 
tact Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, di- 
rector of the School of Busines 
at Northwestern State at (318) 
357-5715, e-mail kfltoaqHne!©, 
HBaflai.edkiior visit linsiaiess^jrsuh 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday Thursday 



58°/35° 



55740° 



Friday 

47/29° 



Saturday 

55742° 



Sunday 

63751° 



Monday 

65744° 



Tuesday 

62746° 





Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
October 10, 2012 



Alpha Kappa Alpha 
sorority encourages 
students to vote 





Alexis Reliford 

Life Editor 

With the 2012 Presidential 
Election growing near, 
more and more students 
find themselves prepar- 
ing to cast their vote. 

Although every student eligi- 
ble to vote is not registered, one 
organization is taking a stand to 
help more students exercising 
their American right to vote, are 
members of Alpha Kappa Alpha 
Sorority, Incorporated. 

According to the Eta Chi 
chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha 
President Gabrielle LaCabe, the 
organization has registered over 
200 students to vote at NSU this 
semester. 

The sorority's goal number of 
registrants was 400. 

LaCabe also noted that the 
majority of students registering 
to vote for the first time were 



freshmen, while upperclassmen 
just needed to change their vot- 
ing location to Natchitoches. 

" w"e even had adult work- 
ers around the school register to 
vote for the first time," LaCabe 
said. 

Students were able to get reg- 
istered and chat with members 
about the election every Tuesday 
at tables set up in the Student 
Union Lobby and Iberville Caf- 
eteria. 

According to LaCabe and 
fellow sorority member, senior 
Briona Hamilton, the idea to host 
voter registration drives came 
from an Alpha Kappa Alpha 
conference the chapter attended 
in early August. 

"Sorors from Louisiana, 
Texas and Arkansas talked about 
their political experiences and 
about their participation in vot- 
ing marches during a time when 
some people weren't allowed to 
vote," Hamilton said. 




Photo by Alexis Reliford 

Eta Chi chapter President Gabrielle LaCabe helps student Tray Cooper 
register to vote at the sorority's voter registration drive. 



"From there our interest 
grew." 

Besides just hosting the reg- 
istration drives, the sorority also 



encouraged students to watch the 
Democratic and Republican Na- 
tional Conventions, by posting 
the video links from YouTube to 



their chapter Twitter page. 

The chapter also took an 
active part in the online discus- 
sion during the first presidential 
debate. 

According to the sorority, 
as young Americans pursu- 
ing degrees and entering the 
real world, students must stay 
updated on what's happening in 
their communities. 

"We are the future," the chap- 
ter members tweeted. 

According to the sorority, 
since the registration deadline 
has passed, it is important to 
actually go out and vote. 

Presidential Election Day is 
Nov. 6 2012 where students can 
join in casting their votes. 

"You can't complain about 
something if you don't do any- 
thing about it," LaCabe said. 

"Your way to do something 
about it is to vote." 



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An ode to the cosmopolitan lifestyle 




It is a widely 
regarded 
truth that 
Natchitoches 
is anything but 
urban. 

There are Jacob Labutka 

no shopping Style Columnist 
malls or 

Aveda spas and the tallest 
structure in town is Prather 
Coliseum. Carrie Bradshaw 
would find it impossible to 
procure the latest Prada bag and 
find a paper willing to publish 
her column "Sex and the City." 

Despite the fact that we are 
certainly not in Manhattan, we 
can still attempt to bring the 
cosmopolitan lifestyle to us. 

I won't rant on the do's and 
do not's of urban fashion (you 
can refer to my column last 
semester if that is what you 
wish). 

I only insist that if you want 
to exceed expectations of a 
small-town wardrobe then don't 
stop looking at the mirror until a 
vibrant you reflects back. 



However, many of you I see 
around campus are far past this 
stage and have creative styles for 
which I applaud you. 

Spending your time in a 
cosmopolitan way also requires a 
certain management of time. 

Those who live in large cities 
feel the need to escape from the 
crowd whereas those, like us, 
in a small town need to escape 
from isolation. 

Everyone, cosmopolitan or 
not, should have a comfortable 
balance between "me" time and 
"we" time. 

The word cosmopolitan also 
implies more than just a trendy, 
urban lifestyle. Part of the urban 
experience is the diversity of 
different personalities that 
constitute its social landscape. 

Case in point, this lifestyle 
means recognizing the 
importance of multiculturalism. 

There are no airports here 
flying in from Malaysia, but we 
do have the internet to virtually 
explore there. 

I'm not saying you have to be 




Submitted Photo 

A city known for housing the cosmopolitan lifestyle, New York City. 



interested in Malaysia (though I 
greatly admire the architecture 
of the Petronas Towers in Kuala 
Lumpur). 

I am saying that being 
aware of international affairs 
and trends will make you one 
savvy character. The world of 



politics extends far beyond the 
American sphere (even though 
many politicians do not seem to 
think so). 

Another way to explore other 
cultures is to attempt to cook as 
they do. 

Host a dinner party with 



friends where you (or one of 
your friends that actually knows 
how to cook) make a foreign 
delicacy. For example, one of 
my good friends has introduced 
me to the wonders of Indian 
food with such dishes as laddu 
(a ball-shaped sweet) and Indian 
noodles. 

Everything I have 
mentioned thus far will not 
necessarily transform you into 
a cosmopolitan superhuman. In 
fact, many of the ideas I listed 
are not uniquely cosmopolitan 
and make sense to incorporate 
into your life regardless of 
geographical location. 

Overall, I merely serve 
to inform my readers of 
cosmopolitan ideas so you may 
incorporate them into your own 
fabulously unique lifestyles. 

Perhaps one day when 
some of us flock to the city, 
Manhattan debutants will have 
r Mhing on us creative personas 
vvho blossomed v. here it was not 
thought possible. 




Did You 
Know? 



That October is National 
Pizza Month? According 
to Pizza.com, America's 
favorite greasy dough has 
it's own national month. 

First observed in the United 
States during 1 984 (although 
many people incorrectly claim 
it was 1987), October was 
designated as National Pizza 
Month by Gerry Durnell, 
the founder of "Pizza Today 
Magazine," who chose that month 
because the first issue of his 
magazine debuted in October of 
that year. 




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Fax: 
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810 Keyser Ave. 
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Countdown Till 
Homecoming 2012 


W 

12 

Days 





Students smile for Fall 



Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 

Fall. It's the season of 
changing colors, cooler weather, 
football games and festivals in 
Natchitoches. 

According to www. weather- 
facts. com, fall is when the days 
are shorter and nights are longer. 
The season brings warm days and 
cool nights, strong winds and lots 
of rain. 

"My favorite part about fall is 
staying in and cuddling," LaKeita 
Bradley, junior accounting major, 
said. The weather is cooler, and 
Bradley said it could make you 
lazy. 

Tameka Hawkins, senior 
criminal justice major, and 
Daniel Thiels, senior general 
studies major, said the weather is 
the best part of fall. They agree 
that fall weather is great because 
it is not too hot and not too cold. 
"You can wear whatever you 



want to wear," Hawkins said. 
Fall's scenery and leaves also 
please them. 

"The colors, I love the 
colors," Thiels said. The only 
thing about the leaves he doesn't 
like is raking them. 

During the fall leaves on 
many trees die and fall to the 
ground. About 500 years ago, 
when Middle English was 
spoken, expressions like "fall of 
the leaf and "fall of the year" 
were quite common and this is 
where the season name "fall" 
comes from according to www. 
examiner.com. 

Hawkins and Bradley like 
the start of football season while 
Thiels feels indifferent about 
football. 

"I like the Boogie on the 
Bricks and Meatpie Festival," 
Hawkins said. Natchitoches hosts 
many fall festivals and events, 
such as Fall Pilgrimage/Tour 
of Homes, Opening of Festival 



of Lights, Meatpie Festival and 
Natchitoches Parish Fair. 

A few holidays are celebrated 
in the fall, but the popular 
holidays are Halloween and 
Thanksgiving. Bradley, Hawkins 
and Thiels said that their favorite 
fall holiday is Thanksgiving. 
They all agreed that food was the 
best part. 

"It's a time to give thanks, 
and I love to eat," Bradley said. 
Thiels said he likes Thanksgiving 
because it's a week-long break 
from school, and he gets to go 
home. In the fall time is set back 
an hour making the nights longer. 

"I don't like the time change," 
Thiels said. Hawkins also doesn't 
like the time change, but Bradley 
likes it. She likes the longer 
night. She gets to sleep longer. 

"It's the season of my 
birthday," Hawkins said. 

For more information on 
Natchitoches events visit 
Natchitochesonthemove.com 






pinions 



Catherine Beverly 

J 

Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
October 10, 2012 



Voter cynicism caused by Electoral College system 



Something that has bothered 
me recently is the system of 
voting in America. As the 
election nears. friends and family 
advertise their favorite candidates 
and remind you: "Vote, vote, vote!" 
Af From 
7 "% hearing how 

■ 3Tj| important 
this election 
JW^^jLk is to how all 
U ^ . ♦ ^ li& concerned 

M I citizens vote, 
Catherine Beverly people are 

Opinions Editor P ressured 
to make 

decisions with a weight on their 
shoulders like they actually matter 
in the long run. 

I know this sounds cynical, but 
the way the system works makes 
it unlikely that any one small 
movement of voters will shake 
Louisiana from what it already is: a 
red state. 

This is not an article aimed 
at swaying voters. It is about the 
voting itself. If there was a major 
overhaul of the electoral system, 



maybe we would make a difference 
in our own elections, but there has 
not been talk of fixing these flaws. 

To understand what I mean, you 
have to know how the Electoral 
College works. The Electoral 
College is a compromise between 
popular vote and the vote of 
Congress. 

Each state is given one electoral 
vote for every member in the House 
of Representatives and two votes 
for the Senators. The Electoral 
College has 538 members and a 
majority, 270 votes, is needed to 
elect a President. 

On a state level, you see some 
of the hypocrisy of this system of 
democracy. Let us say Louisiana 
is split almost halfway: 58 percent 
red (Republican) to 42 percent blue 
(Democrat). Instead of allotting 
some members to vote for the 
Republican candidate and some 
for the Democratic candidate, all 
electoral votes would go to the 
Republican candidate. 

This may seem fine, but the 
situation is surely reversed in other 




The 

Electoral College 

fay Numbers 

435*100*3=538 



A photo of designated electoral votes for each state. For more information on voting and the Electoral College, 
please visit: www.usa.govlCitizen/TopicslVoting.shtml 



states. In Louisiana, this means 
nearly 2 million voters have just 
been disregarded. That is shameful. 



Although some states (Maine 
and Nebraska) have improvised 
by implementing a "proportional 



representation" system for their 
own votes. 

The Electoral College system 



caused much controversy in the 
2000 presidential race of Al Gore 
versus George Bush. Gore had the 
popular vote, but lost due to Bush's 
electoral votes. 

This close call shows how a small 
percentage of American voters, can 
actually make a difference. 
The "winner-take-all" attitude of 
our current system makes me lose 
any enthusiasm I may have had 
about voting. I will say that I am a 
proponent of Obama, which means 
my vote will probably go uncounted 
in this election. 

I will not stop trying, but I am 
more interested in seeing a revamp 
in our archaic system. Remnants 
of a society still on the edge of 
aristocracy, such as the Electoral 
College, have no place in a 
democratic society. 

I am definitely for some sort 
of check and balance system to 
dissuade against an uninformed 
public, which was the original fear 
of the founders of this system, but 
we must vote as a nation if we are 
to be a nation. 



Is television making us stupid? 



Like most of my peers, I am 
addicted to reality television. 
Last weekend, 1 splurged 
and caught up on all of the 
"Housewives" that I've 
missed over the past couple 
of weeks. After watching 
"The Real Housewives 
of New Jersey Reunion" 
part one and "The Real 
Housewives of New York" 
season finale, I found 




either. 

What is the point in watching 
a bunch of 16-18 year olds have 
kids they can't take care of? I 
could have stayed in 
high school — even junior 
high! — if 1 wanted to see 
that drama. The phrase 
that Andy Warhol coined, 
"15 minutes of fame," 
has been taken to the next 
level. Seriously. It's now 



myself asking Twitter, Camille Mosley 30 m j nut es to an hour of 
"Why am^iteatthing Mfflfeshman Scholar 

fame every week. 

i these shows?!" 



The simple answer would be 
that there is nothing else on. I don't 
watch too much television, and I 
find that I stand out from most of 
my peers because I don't watch 
"Jersey Shore". I don't stoop to the 
level of watching "Teen Mom", 



Then to go and make 
spinoffs of these morons' lives 
is utterly ridiculous. Whatever 
happened to good shows such 
"The Nanny" or "Golden Girls?" 
How about the "Rugrats," "Hey 
Arnold," "Johnny Bravo" or even 
'Dexter's Laboratory?" Heck, even 



the old Disney Channel with "Even 
Stevens," "Smart Guy," "Boy Meets 
Girl," and "Sister Sister?" 

Now, all of these new television 
shows — cartoon, reality, sitcom, or 
whatever the hell the new Disney 
Channel calls their shows — teaches 
children that is okay to be snipid. 
Even the History Channel has 
stooped to new lows with reruns ' 
and focuses on shows like "Ancient 
Aliens" and "Monster Quest." 

Someone needs to rise up from 
the ashes and slay those television 
producers. As a former avid 
television watcher, I hate to turn 
on my television because I know 
there will be nothing good on, I will 
have to sit through commercial after 
commercial and rerun after rerun 
of the same stupidity that is helping 
the rest of the world hate America. 









Jimmie Walker 


^^urrent 


Chris Degeyter 


Editor-in-Chief 




Sauce Reporter 






Dr. Paula Furr 




Jessica Blow 


Adviser 


Kirstie White 


Sauce Reporter 




Copy Editor 




Ty Johnson 




JC Bryant 


News Editor 


Jacob Labutka 


Social Media 




Lifestyle Columnist 




Alexis Reliford 




Camille Mosley 


Life Editor 


Andrea Nederostova 


Freshman Scholar 




Sauce Reporter 




Jimmie Walker 




Taylor Furr 


Sports Editor 


Contessa Wills 


Delivery Personnel 




Sauce Reporter 




Catherine Beverly 


Office phone 


Opinions Editor 


Damian Glover 


318-357-5456 




Sauce Reporter 






www.nsucurrentsauce.pom 





We need writers! 



• ; • k ■ 1 ■ ■„. 



Interested? Come by our office, 227 Kyser, if you would like to join. 
Meetings are Monday at 6:50 p.m. We hope to hear from you! 



Current Sauce staff 



! 

DTTi-miDT-ir-iiVir-T 




m THEN THE NETWORKS REAUZEP THEY DlPNT KEEP 
THE CANPIWtfES TO HPU? DEWES... 




"HEYf IF ANYBOY WANTS TO ftUILP k PIPELINE FROM 
THE FLOCpfi) SULF COAST TO THE M1WEST, I'M Mi FCR IT.' " 




Super Crossword 
answers for the 
September 26th 
issue of The 
Current Sauce 



Super Crossword 

Answers 



- 




C 




S 


* 


\ 


H 








A 




A 


T 


A 


V 




R 


A 


V 


s 


E 


L 


L 




M 


E 






The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
October 10, 2012 



Demons clip Cardinals 30-23 



Chris Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

The Demon football team ad- 
vanced to 3-3 and showcased 
a rushing attack Saturday 
night with a 30-23 victory over con- 
ference rival Lamar. 

The w in puts the Demons at 1-1 
in Southland Conference play while 
dropping the Cardinals to 2-4 overall 
and 0-2 in conference. 

A solid defensive effort through- 
out the night helped the Demons 
ward off the Cardinals, holding La- 
mar to 285 yards, with 78 of those 
yards from a final drive at the end of 
the game. Before that final drive, La- 
mar had only 207 total yards against 
the Demons. 

The Demons defensive effort also 
tallied five sacks after getting only- 
four in the last five weeks, including 
one from junior defensive lineman 
Lesley Deamer that forced a fumble 
on the Cardinals' five-yard line. That 
fumble resulted in an eventual De- 
mon touchdown. 

"We w atched a lot of film, and our 
coaches really put us in a great po- 
sition to make plays," Deamer said. 
"We've been working hard." 

Deamer's forced fumble was just 
one of four turnovers from the Car- 
dinals. 

Meanwhile on offense the De- 
mons totaled 310 yards, with 206 
yards on the ground. 

The Demons strong effort was led 
by senior wide receiver Phillip Har- 
vey, who succeeded at whatever of- 
fensive play the Demons needed him 
to make. Harvey ran for 84 yards 
and a touchdown on 7 attempts as a 
quarterback in the wildcat formation 
while receiving for 16 yards in three 
catches. Harvey also returned only 
two punts for 7 1 yards and a kickoff 
for 1 6 yards. 

"I just saw my offensive line win- 
ning, and when they win, we score," 
Harvey said. 




Photos by Gary Hardamon 

Receiver Phillip Harvey breaks into open space against the Lamar Cardinals. NSU beat the Cardinals, 30-23. Lineman Lesley Deamer forces a fumble to seal the win for the Demons. 



On the other side of the running 
game, junior running back Robert 
Walker rushed for 103 yards and a 
touchdown in 23 carries. 

Walker said he gives the credit to 
the offensive line and his coaches for 
the strong day offensively. Walker 
said he just tried to go in and do his 
best to help his team win. 

Demon quarterback, senior Brad 
Henderson, seemed to be the only 
Demon "having a bad day," manag- 
ing to complete only 11 of 24 passes 
with one interception, but in those 



1 1 completed passes he still reached 
1 04 yards with one touchdown pass! 

"I think it was a great team win, I 
really do," Demon head coach Brad- 
ley Peveto said. "1 thought our guys 
did a great job executing our plans. I 
thought we really minimized the big 
plays. We made them earn it." 

The Demons now look toward 
Hammond as they prepare for their 
next game on the road against the 
Southeastern Lions. 

The Lions are 2-4 overall and 
coming off of a non-conference loss, 



but they have proven that they can 
win when it matters. 

The Lions are 2-0 in Southland 
Conference play, and currently lead 
the division as the only team unde- 
feated in the conference. 

The Demons are currently 0-3 in 
away games and are buckling down 
to focus on practice in order to try to 
overcome the undefeated conference 
rival Lions. 

Demons will play Southeastern 
Lions this Saturday at Strawberry 
Stadium in Hammond at 3 p.m. 





Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Stacey DiFrancesco stops a score from SHS. DiFrancesco recorded a double-double with 16 digs and 16 kills. 

Bearkats claw Lady Demons 

Courtesy of Sports Info: 



Stacey DiFrancesco and Kelly 
Jimenez had great performanc- 
es for the Northwestern State 
volleyball team but their efforts fell 
short as the Lady Demons lost to 
Sam Houston State on Saturday af- 
ternoon at Johnson Coliseum. 

The 19-25, 19-25, 25-17, 17-25 
loss lowers NSU to 12-8 overall and 
4-4 in Southland Conference action. 
The Bearkats improve to 10-9, 6-2. 

"Sam Houston did a great job 
of pressuring us from the service 
line," said NSU co-head coach Hugh 
Hernesman. "Our passing was not 
quite what it normally is but I think 
our offensive numbers were similar. 

"We had to make some adjust- 
ments after the first two sets but I 
was happy with how we performed 
in the third."" 

SHSU's Devene Wells-Gibson 
landed a game-high 20 kills, com- 
mitting only four errors. 

DiFrancesco recorded her eighth 
double-double effort, registering 16 
kills and 16 digs. 

"Stacey did a good job tonight," 



said Hernesman. "We are trying to 
get her to be a little more aggressive 
but she is on a good path." 
Jimenez collected 19 digs while 
also hammering down nine kills and 
blocking three attacks. 

Sam Houston started off the first 
set red hot, running out to a 6-2 lead 
early on. The Lady Demons trimmed 
the deficit to 6-5 after an SHSU ser- 
vice error sparked a 3-0 run. 

NSU tried to hold on but the 
Bearkats pulled away again after a 
series of kills and NSU attack errors 
put the score at 16-10. Northwestern 
State was unable to gain a lead and 
dropped the set 25-19. 

The Lady Demons looked good to 
start out the second set, starting with 
a 3-0 run but SHSU answered with a 
streak of their own, knotting up the 
game at 4-4. 

Sam Houston took the lead as the 
scoreboard read 8-7 and controlled 
the momentum for the remainder of 
the game. The Bearkats won the set 
25-19. 

The third set started out competi- 
tively but Northwestern State pulled 
away from Sam Houston after a se- 



ries of kills led to a score of 18-7. 

The Bearkats attempted to make 
a comeback but never led. The Lady 
Demons took the set 25-17. 

Northwestern State looked prom- 
ising early on in the fourth, main- 
taining the lead from 2- 1 through the 
14-13 mark. SHSU went on a 4-0 
run to strengthen their lead to 18-14. 
The Lady Demons were not able to 
keep up and never led again, falling 
25-17. 

"This match shows us that the 
conference race is wide open," said 
Hernesman. "I think through this 
first half of the conference season 
we have learned where we need to 
improve. 

"We are still a very young group 
that is growing so we are going to 
take these lessons and see where we 
can improve." 

NSU returns home on Thursday to 
take on the Lady Lions of Southeast- 
ern Louisiana. The match is slated to 
begin at 7 p.m. at Prather Coliseum. 



For complete story 
visit nsudemons.com 



Lady Demons fall to SFA, 3-0 



Brittany Russ 

Sauce Reporter 

Stephen F. Austin's Chelsea 
Raymond scored twice as the 
Northwestern State Lady De- 
mon soccer team fell 3-0 Sunday 
afternoon in a Southland Conference 
match-up. 

"We played a good first half, and 
then we had a little moment of col- 
lapse allowing SFA to score a few 
goals," said head coach George Van 
Linder. 

NSU (5-7-1, 0-2-1) kept the La- 
dyjacks (11-3, 3-0) from scoring in 
the first half as both teams entered 
halftime scoreless. 

SFA did not waste any time in the 
second half as it scored at the 48-min- 
ute mark. Zuri Prince knocked down 
a cross from Megan Dunnigan inside 
the box and shot low to put the Lady- 
jacks on the board. 

Raymond earned her first tally- 
less than five minutes later as she 
dribbled into the box and placed the 
ball into the lower left hand corner. 
She scored again at the 64-minute 
mark after receiving a short pass 
from Kylie Louw. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Danielle Harding tries to avoid the SFA defender. NSU lost to SFA 3-0. 



Lacey Lee and Morgan Glick 
made two saves each to give SFA the 
shutout. 

Brooke Bourbonais and Jessica 
Danku made a combined six saves 
in net. 

"We are so close to being the type 
of team we want to be, but we have 
to demand more from ourselves," 



said Van Linder. 

The Lady Demons travel to 
Southland Conference opponent 
Sam Houston State on Friday. Kick- 
off is slated for 7 o'clock. They will 
return home on October 1 9th to face 
McNeese. The game is slated to be- 
gin at 7 p.m. at the Lady Demon soc- 
cer complex. 





91,7 FM 



ofKNWD 



"Fho 




u r rent 




Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, October 17, 2012 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



\vww.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 6 



D.O.V.E.S. to host fundraiser 



"To change it for 
one person is al- 
ready worth it. " 

Shannon Durham 
DOVES Project and Program 
Director 

Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 

October is National Domestic 
Violence Awareness month. 
To combat domestic 
violence Natchitoches serves the 
community with the organization 
Domestic Violence Education 
and Support Inc., or D.O.V.E.S. 

D.O.V.E.S. is a shelter for 
women who have experienced 
abusive relationships. It is 
located in Natchitoches and 
accepts women from all over the 
nation. 

D.O.V.E.S. was formed in 
1998 as an agency that helped 
women in abusive relationships 
and found them shelters to live. 
In 2006 a house was donated 
and remodeled and D.O.V.E.S. 
became a shelter of its own 
where Abby Garcia, the executive 
director of, runs the organization. 

Services provided by 
D.O.V.E.S. include a 24-hour 
hotline, several clothing drives a 




A candlelight vigil that took place 

year with can food drives coming 
soon, fund raisers and teaching the 
community. 

Shannon Durham, projects 
and programs director, said that 
they also provide legal advocacy 
during court cases and are 
essentially an extra pair of eyes 
and ears for our clients who may 
be under great physical and mental 
stress during a trial. 

D.O.V.E.S. has many events 
in store to raise awareness of 
domestic violence. A candlelight 



on Oct. 1 honoring domestic violen 

vigil was held on Oct. I to honor 
the 58 individuals who passed 
away last year in Louisiana from 
domestic violence. 

Mayor Lee Posey declared 
October as domestic violence 
awareness month for Natchitoches 
and even presented D.O.V.E.S. 
with a certificate honoring the 
organization. 

When it comes to D.O.V.E.S. 
presence on campus Garcia says it 
is something that hasn't happened 
enough and that should change in 



Submitted Photo 

ce victims in the past year. 

the future. 

Both Durham and Garcia 
experienced similar situations to 
the women in D.O.V.E.S. that they 
serve. Their situations drove them 
to help others like they had been 
helped. 

" What started out as necessity 
turned into passion," Durham said. 
"D.O.V.E.S is a symbol of hope, 
freedom and safety." 

"We're here to provide all 
that," Durham added with a smile. 



"I enjoy knowing at the end of my 
day that I've made a difference. 
For someone that was in a similar 
position as I was to change it for 
one person is already worth it." 

To anyone who would like to 
volunteer or make a donation, the 
D.O.V.E.S. website is currently 
undergoing construction and has 
a volunteering application which 
can be completed. 

This Thursday D.O.V.E.S. will 
be hosting their annual Cochon de 
Lait at the Natchitoches Country 
Club. This event has happened 
every year since at least 2005 and 
features a live auction, door prizes 
and this year a hat contest. 

Hardrick and the Rivers 
Review will be playing and 
DOVES will reward someone 
with their Volunteer of the Year 
award. All the proceeds go to 
helping out the organization. 

"It's a celebration of life," 
Durham said. 

Kristie Sims, assistant director 
of counseling and career services, 
refers students to D.O.V.E.S. and 
that she does her own seminars on 
healthy relationships. 

A clothing drive is being put 
on until Nov. 9. Anyone who 
would like to donate clothing can 
email socialwork3 140@yahoo. 
com to set up a date, time and 
location to drop off any clothing. 



Student Messenger 
Update 



WRAC Boot Camp 
Oct. 17 
5:30 a.m. 

Supreme Court 
9:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m. 
Magale Recital Hall 
Oct. 18 

NSU Alumni Association 
Homecoming 5K Run 
Oct. 27 



Get Lit Radio KNWD, 

The Demon 91.7 
Wednesdays 9:30 a.m. to 
10:30 a.m. 



Fall Read 
Oct. 30 
5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. 
Watson Library, Thom- 
as-D'Amato Reading 
Room, 201-B 



What a Northwestern State degree can do for you 

State Rep. Henry Burns has success in the military, business and politics 




Submitted Photo 

Burns will be signing copies of his book and telling some of his favorite stories at Kings Hardware in Shreve- 
port from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 14 and at Barnes and Noble in Shreveport on Nov. 15 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. 



Courtesy of News Bureau 

State Rep. Henry Bums of 
Haughton has demonstrated 
during his colorful career 
in business, politics, military service 
and most recently as an author just 
how versatile, flexible and successful 
Northwestern State University gradu- 
ates can be. 

Burns, who enrolled at Northwest- 
ern after graduation from high school 
in the little Webster Parish town of 
Shongaloo, earned a bachelor's de- 
gree in upper elementary education 



in 1970 and later received a master's 
from Pepperdine University in Cali- 
fornia. 

Planning to use his education de- 
grees for a career in teaching, Bums 
got sidetracked by a commission as 
a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army 
and became an expert and instructor 
in explosive ordinance disposal for 
military "bomb squads." 

His academic background in edu- 
cation helped prepare Bums to teach 
U.S. soldiers, NATO forces, FBI and 
CIA officers and others classes in 
military munitions, clandestine devic- 



es, Presidential security and special 
weapons. 

After nearly eight years in the 
Army and two decades in the Army 
Reserv es, Bums retired as a lieutenant 
colonel and received the prestigious 
Meritorious Serv ice Medal. 

When Bums ended his full-time 
stint in the Army in the late 1970s, oil 
fields around his hometown of Shon- 
galoo and other parts of North Loui- 
siana were bustling with activity, and 
he decided to get in on the oil business 
boom. 

Henry had seen a lot of the country 



in his military travels, but he wanted 
to get back close to his roots when 
it came time to settle down. He had 
fond memories of his time in the 
woods, rivers and streams that sur- 
rounded his little hometown. 

There was also a strong, lifelong 
bond with his college alma mater 
in Natchitoches, which was not far 
away. His mother had graduated from 
Northwestern and was an elementary 
teacher. His dad attended LSU and 
became a Farm Bureau agent after a 
career of military service. 

Henry and his wife Lynette guided 
all four of their children to Northwest- 
ern although Lynette went to Kansas 
State. Henry said he could accept that, 
because the school's colors of purple 
and white are the same as Northwest- 
em's. All of Henry and Lynette's kids 
and their spouses are NSU alumni. 

The Burns family was living the 
good life when oil wells were pump- 
ing and he was an independent petro- 
leum and natural gas operator, but the 
bottom dropped out of the oil business 
in the state in the 1980s. 

Then Henry, who had kids in col- 
lege and had also become a thorough- 
bred owner and breeder when times 
were good, started looking for a better 
way to feed his family and his stable 
of horses. 

Bums heard that The Wooden 
Spoon, a bakery that specialized in 
gift baskets of cookies and cakes, was 
for sale. With no skills or knowledge 
about the baking business except a 
deep appreciation for his grandmoth- 
er's banana nut bread, Henry bought 



the bakery. 

Henry and a couple of employees 
made bushels of cookies and cakes 
from scratch every morning, and he 
personally delivered gift baskets of 
the baked goods by the thousands 
over the years to birthday parties, 
hospitals, holiday events, offices and 
homes. 

He became known as the Cookie 
Man and made a lot of friends as he 
delivered gift baskets far and wide 
for special occasions, captivated folks 
with his wit and charisma and enter- 
tained them with downhome stories 
about his life and Shongaloo upbring- 
ing. 

Careful to remind people that he is 
the Cookie Man with a "C" and not 
a "K," Henry acknowledges that he 
might be viewed once in a while as a 
little "kooky" because of his flamboy- 
ance and gregarious personality. 

But it was that unique persona, 
combined with his military and busi- 
ness experience, strong educational 
background, compassion for people 
and the relationships that he built by 
visiting with so many folks through 
the years, that helped launch yet an- 
other successful career for Henry... 
this time in politics. 

He was elected to the Bossier Par- 
ish School Board and served in that 
position for 1 5 years. Then Henry ex- 
panded his political influence by win- 
ning a seat in the Louisiana House in 
2007. He was re-elected to the posi- 
tion last year without opposition. 

Bums is popular with legislative 
colleagues and has also been an effec- 



tive part of major reforms in the state 
as an ally and floor leader for Gov. 
Bobby Jindal. 

Friends in the House and Senate 
say that if the legislature had a con- 
geniality award similar to those for 
beauty contests, Henry would win it. 
Not the beauty contest, just the con- 
geniality award. 

Now Henry is adding a new chap- 
ter to his life so to speak. He is call- 
ing himself an author, but that might 
be stretching it a bit. Actually, he 
wrote just a chapter for a new book 
entitled, "Meanwhile, Back at Cafe 
Du Monde." 

The book that was created and 
edited by Peggy Sweeney McDonald 
and produced by Pelican Publishing 
Company includes 77 chapters by 
restaurant owners, chefs, elected of- 
ficials and other notable personalities 
focusing on a wide variety of Louisi- 
ana foods, culture and cuisine. 

Bums' segment of the slick, 
200-page publication highlights his 
Wooden Spoon business and touch- 
es on other aspects of the life of the 
Cookie Man, a title that he treasures. 
Included in the chapter by Burns is 
a recipe for the kind of banana nut 
bread that he could smell baking in 
his grandmother's oven as he grew 
up in the Red Rock Hills of North 
Louisiana. 



For the rest of this story, check 
out www. http://news.nsula. 
edu.com 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday Thursday 



64747° 



65747 c 



Friday 

62/44° 



Saturday 

57741° 



Sunday 

59741° 



Monday 

67747° 



Tuesday 

60740° 





Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
areliforOO 2 @student. nsula.edu 
October 17, 2012 



'Smokey Joe's Cafe' makes its NSU debut 



Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

Last Thursday NSU's 
Theatre and Dance presented 
"Smokey Joe's Cafe" at 
Theater West. "Smokey Joe's 
Cafe" is a musical revue that 
features popular songs writ- 
ten by Jerry Leiber and Mike 
Stoller. 

Some of the songs that 
attendees may recognize are 
"Kansas City" (Wilbert Harri- 
son), "Hound Dog" (Elvis Pre- 
sley), Stand by Me" (Ben E. 
King), "There Goes My Baby" 
(The Drifters) and "Yakety 
Yak" (The Coasters). 

Because "Smokey Joe's" 
is a musical revue, there is no 
story line. There are 44 music 
numbers performed by ten 
students. Student performers 
prepared for the musical with 
40 rehearsals Sunday through 
Friday for three and a half 
hours. 

The cast includes Julian 
Anderson, Billy Applewhite, 
David Brumfield, Tori Corm- 
ier, Rachel Harper, Polanco 
Jones, Jr., Taylor Morgan, 
DeAngelo Renard, Latreshia 
Stormer and Lauren Wagues- 
pack. 

Pia Wyatt, Managing 
Director/Associate Artistic Di- 



rector and Associate Professor 
of Theatre, will serve as direc- 
tor. She described the musical 
as a celebration of life as well 
as a celebration of the music 
from the 50s and 60s. Students 
can expect "excellent singing, 
fantastic dancing, high energy 
and rollicking, jovial fun," 
Wyatt said. 

Despite being proven that 
fine arts education improves 
student's performance in other 
subject areas such as Math and 
English, institutions continue 
to cut funding. 

Wyatt attributes this to 
the fact that the arts are not a 
money maker. She does, how- 
ever, think that fine arts are 
necessary to everyone's life. 

"We need a release. We 
need an outlet, something to 
take us away to a better place 
after a long day," she said. 
"We get that from the theatre." 

Budget cuts have forced 
CAPA to be creative and 
frugal. "Smokey Joe's Cafe" 
is cheaper to produce than a 
work of Shakespeare because 
the cast is small and does not 
require multiple elaborate cos- 
tumes or set changes. Doing a 
revue helps to balance out the 
season financially. 

The money saved on 
"Smokey Joe's Cafe" can be 




Photo Courtesey of News Bereau 

'Smokey Joe's Cafe" cast members from left to right: David Brumfield, Latreshia Stormer and Taylor Morgan. 



used towards the next produc- 
tion, "A Mid-Summer Night's 
Dream." Costumes are ei- 
ther made by the students or 
recycled from other shows. 
Also, the stage and lights were 
designed by students as well. 

Opening night was a major 
success; there was not an 
empty seat in the house. From 
on-campus chatter, it would 
appear that subsequent shows 
will achieve the same level of 
success. S 



haniqua Lottihall, a sopho- 
more Psychology student, is 
looking forward to seeing 
"Smokey Joe's Cafe." 

"I enjoy musicals, es- 
pecially the ones at NSU," 
Lottihall said. "I've heard of 
some of the music and I think 
it would be really interesting 
and fun to watch." 

Smokey Joe's Cafe will be 
performed from the 17th to 
the 20th. Admission for NSU, 
BPCC and Louisiana School 



for Math, Science and the Arts 
students is free with a current 
student I.D. Admission for 
adults is $15, while admission 
for children and senior citi- 
zens is $12. 

Tickets may be purchased 
online at theatre.nsula.edu. To 
make reservations, which are 
mandatory, please contact Jane 
Norman at normanj@nsula.edu 
or call (318) 357-4483. 



Online Shopping: Not a Scandal like in 'South Park' 




I'd hate to 
admit it, but 
the most 
recent episode 
of "South 

Park" is my „ 

. , Jacob Labutka 

inspiration 

for this Style Columnist 
week. 

I'm not suggesting that you 
wear Stan's red poof-ball hat or 
child pants that make you look 
like you only have ankles and no 
legs. 

The most recent episode was 
about a scandal surrounding 
the UPS man who had been 
delivering Amazon packages to 
the wives of South Park. 

I hardly seek to discuss 
marital scandal, but there is a 
continually growing trend among 
American consumers: online 
shopping. 

Most of us have experienced 
the convenience that is 
associated with online shopping. 
There's more selection online 
than in a physical store (since 
the selection is pretty much 



anything), you don't have to 
leave home and you can often 
save a lot of money. But is it 
actually better to go to a virtual 
store than a physical one? Well, 
it depends. 

When it comes to your 
cosmetics, especially makeup, 
I would suggest only buying 
them online if you've bought it 
from a store before and know 
how it wears. It would be best to 
avoid the unthinkable travesty 
of ordering a foundation that is 
too dark and makes you look like 
Snooki. 

Whether or not you should 
order clothes online depends on 
what you're looking to buy. 

For example, I was recently 
on the hunt for some new pants. 
Unfortunately, most stores do not 
carry giant sizes (I'm 6' 7"), and 
when I find pants that fit they 
are often baggy and unflattering. 

As a result, the online Old 
Navy store became my new best 
friend, and I bought a pair of 
skinny jeans and brown corduroy 
pants. 



1 — 


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■■ ■ - . 
















. i 

/ 1 













Holding their new Amazon purchase 
Scouten (right). 

However, one cannot deny the 
pleasure that comes from going 
on a shopping spree. 

There's something gratifying 
about trying on several different 
options and then picking the best 
one. Also, there are some things 
that look cute on the hanger, 
but trying them on becomes the 



Submitted Photo 
are Jordan Smith (left) and Kara 

worst decision you have ever 
made. 

Actually going to the store 
and trying on clothes gives the 
comfort of certainty since you 
know that what you try on will 
fit well and look good. There's 
often times risk involved with 
online clothing purchases. A 



size small for one company will 
certainly not fit the same as 
another. 

I can wear anything from an 
extra-small to a small depending 
on the company and/or type 
of clothing. Overall, neither 
method of shopping is better. 

We're definitely not as 
dependent on online shopping as 
the husbands of "South Park." 

They complained of having 
to physically go to the store after 
beating up the UPS man. To help 
scare the UPS man they wore 
Bane (from Batman) masks, 
which I do not recommend as 
a daily accessory (a Halloween 
idea perhaps). 

To ^et back on point, the 
method of shopping you choose 
all dep s on what you want to 
buy and what mood you're in. 
Sometimes you want to cuddle 
with a blanket, -ink hot cocoa 
ai J order some fuzzy socks 
online. 

And other times you want to 
go out to the mall with friends 
in a new pair shoes and then 

proceed to buy even more shoes. 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

"Pitch Perfect" 

Rated PG-13 

4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

Taken 2" 

Rated PG-13 

4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

"House At The 
End Of The Street" 

Rated PG-13 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

looper" 

Rated R 
4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 




Did You 

Know? 



More American 
Presidents were 
born in the month of 
October than any other 
month. They were John Adams, 
Rutherford B. Hayes, Chester 
Arthur, Theodore Roosevelt, 
Dwight Eisenhower and Jimmy 
Carter. 




KNWD's hosts Attack of the Jack-O-Lanterns 



Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 

Do you know how to carve a 
Jack-O-Lantern? Would you like 
to showcase you talent? Well, 91.7 
KNWD The Demon is hosting 
Attack of the Jack-O-Lantern this 
Thursday, Oct. 1 8 from 5 p.m. to 7 
p.m in the Student Union Ballroom. 

Attack of the Jack-O-Lantern 
is an art show competition where 
students carve jack-o-lanterns and 
showcase their art before three 
judges. Also, students get a chance 
to choose their favorite jack-o- 
lantern. 

There will be no real carving 
at the event and no real candles 
allowed, but electronic LED tea 
light candles are allowed. 



The jack-o-lanterns are separated 
into three categories, which are 
Traditional, School Spirit and Plain 
Awesome. School Spirit and Plain 
Awesome are considered non- 
traditional categories. Students can 
only enter one category. 

The Traditional category rules 
are that the jack-o-lantern must 
have two eyes, but the nose is 
optional. The School Spirit rules 
the jack-o-lantern must be NSU or 
organization related and can have 
items such as logos, emblems or 
Greek letters. The Plain Awesome 
category consists of anything 
non-traditional. It doesn't have to 
have two eyes, a mouth or be NSU 
related. 

There will be three winners, one 
for each category. The winners get 



two three-day passes tickets to the 
Voodoo Fest in New Orleans-'-one 
of Louisiana's biggest music fests- 
which will be held on Oct. 26-28. 

"So if you're a really good 
pumpkin carver, and you can 
draw like the depth star, I highly 
encourage that," Richard Sharp, 
senior accounting major, said. 

Don't know how to carve? 
KNWD has posted a free template 
on www.facebook.com/knwdnsu, 
which gives directions on how to 
carve a jack-o-lantem. 

KNWD teamed with Sudexo to 
provide refreshments and there will 
also be a DJ. 

The KNWD staff only had a 
month to prepare this event, but 
staffs quick preparation can be 
attributed to their willingness to 



work together. 

"The w hole staff in general is 
just like a big collaborative group 
of people." Sharp said. "We get 
along really well." 

The event was inspired by 
KNWD's receipt of Voodoo Fest 
Tickets from Nichols State. KNWD 
plans to make the event annual. 

"It's a good way to give away 
tickets," Tara Luck, KNWD general 
manager, said. "Come out and have 
a good time and bring a friend." 

The application to enter the 
contest is on NSU's Orgsync 
Facebook page. The last day to 
enter the contest is this Wednesday 
at 9 p.m. 

For more information 
about Voodoo Fest, visit www. 
thevoodooexperience.com. 




Submitted Photo 
KNWD's Attack of the Jack-O-Laterns promotional poster. 





pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
October 17,2012 



Book publication goes through a digital revolution 



TThe standard for literature has 
been in constant fluctuation 
since the invention of the 
printing press in 1 440 
B.C. The ease of printing 
and mass production 
allowed everyday 
citizens to read works 
that had been unavailable 
to them. 

Einstein once 



The modern day equivalent 
of the Printing Revolution is the 
Digital Revolution. E-readers such 
as the Kindle and Nook 
affected many levels of 
printing and reading. 
For those who do not 
own an e-reader, you 
can download the app 
for a computer, phone 
Catherine Beverly or tablet at Amazon's 



I 



said that the Printing Opinions Editor 
Revolution acted as 
an agent of change in Europe. It 
allowed the spread of ideas and 
information on a huge scale. 



website. 

For writers, finding 
publishers was no longer a 
necessity. Amazon's e-book library 
is filled with free downloads from 



up-and-coming authors. While some 
books could use the help of a good 
editor, there are a few diamonds in 
the rough that are snatched up by 
readers. 

For readers, the price of being an 
avid reader dropped dramatically. 
Affordability was a major decision 
in book buying of the past, but now 
it has become less of one. After a 
one-time cost of around $79, you 
could have access to tons of free 
books. Maybe these aren't best- 
sellers, but you can read the entirety 
of Shakespeare's work for free. 

If you are a member of Amazon 



Prime, you can lend and borrow 
books from across the country. 
If you are a member of the local 
library, you are allowed to rent 
out digital copies of books just as 
you would a print copy. Project 
Gutenberg, named after the 
inventor of the printing press, is 
even transcribing the world's best 
literature into digital format to be 
downloaded for free. 

Just as the printing press allowed 
for the widespread transmission of 
ideas and information, the digital 
age is giving people the opportunity 
to learn more than ever before. A 



mixture of old and new is available 
at the fingertips of almost everyone 
in America. 

As someone who was an avid 
reader long before these newfangled 
inventions, I can tell you I still love 
the feeling of a print book in my 
hands, but as someone who doesn't 
have much money, being able to 
get light reading for a few dollars 
is something that has changed my 
outlook on life. 

So, the only question left is 
whether or not this is a good thing. 
The pros are easy: downloading 
books is easier, cheaper and faster 



than driving to get print books. The 
cons may be a little harder. For 
example, the print industry is in 
a huff trying to figure out how to 
incorporate this new medium, and 
I'm left wondering if this new influx 
of cheap books is really helping our 
country. 

Sure, you can get "The World 
According to Monsanto" for less 
than $5, but books like "Nothing 
Stays in Vegas" have triple the 
reviews and cost nothing. So, which 
one do you think a busy American 
will take time out of their day to 
read? 



Visible undergarments: Fashion ortrashin'? 




A couple of w eeks ago I 
happened to post a status 
on Facebook stating my 
opinion about a certain look I see 
indecently 
exposed 
girls wear. 
It included 
a small rant 
about how girls 
wear black or 
patterned 

Camille Mosley brasu|(h 
Freshman Scholar sneer an j 

white shirts, 
and how most girls intentionally 
show their bras and bra straps in 
public. This post upset off a lot of 
people. 

I didn't realize making a small 
statement on Facebook would affect 
so many lives. When I made this 
statement, I was in the cafeteria and 
a girl was wearing a sec-through 
shirt with a patterned bra. She could 



have chosen to wear a nude bra 
because they make nude bras for 
that purpose. 

After seeing this girl, I was 
scrolling through my newsfeed 
when I saw pictures of a girl 
in a bikini, pictures of herself 
intoxicated and another picture 
with her black bra visibly showing 
through her white shirt. 

Not giving too much thought of 
the repercussions, I decided to post 
a status that claimed these "fashion" 
habits were unacceptable because it 
makes girls come off as not having 
any self-respect or dignity, and quite 
frankly, my mother raised me better 
than to do things like that. 

The backlash of posting that 
status was horrendous. Many guys, 
surprisingly, commented defending 
their girlfriends' honor, or what 
little those girls had. I know in fact 
that one of the guy's girlfriends has 
a child. 



Not to mention, one guy added 
me on Facebook two w eeks later 
just to find this status and comment 
on it. After all of this drama, I 
talked about it with my mother. She 
completely agreed with me because, 
in her own words, "I raised you to 
have class, not to be trash." 

Now, to all those naysayers out 
there who say that I'm just being a 
prude, I ask you, how many movie 
stars do you see showing their bra 
straps or bras at events? How about 
anyone in the royal family? How 
about your local doctor? 

All I'm saying is that no self- 
respecting woman would publicly 
show her undergarments. What 
happens in the privacy of one's 
home, well, that isn't any of my 
business. Walk around naked for all 
I care. 

If one walks around with his 
or her undergarments showing, be 
prepared to be harshly judged. 









Jimmie Walker 


^^urrent 


Chris Degeyter 


Editor-in-Chief 




Sauce Reporter 






Dr. Paula Furr 




Jessica Blow 


Adviser 


Kirstie White 


Sauce Reporter 




Copy Editor 




Ty Johnson 




JC Bryant 


News Editor 


Jacob Labutka 


Social Media 




Lifestyle Columnist 




Alexis Reliford 




Camille Mosley 


Life Editor 


Andrea Nederostova 


Freshman Scholar 




Sauce Reporter 




Jimmie Walker 




Taylor Furr 


Sports Editor 


Contessa Wills 


Delivery Personnel 




Sauce Reporter 




Catherine Beverly 




Office phone 


Opinions Editor 


Damian Glover 


318-357-5456 



Sauce Reporter 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



We need writers! 

Our newspaper needs stories written by students. Come by our office, 
227 Kyser, if you would like to join. Meetings are every Monday at 6:50 
p.m. We hope to hear from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 





RELIEF FOR 



ACROSS 

1 Capital of 

Kazakhstan 
7 Suffix with 

cyto- 
12 South 

American 

capital 

20 Bull's-eye 

21 Mello — 
(soft drink) 

22 Small wind 
instruments 

23 Start of a 
riddle 

25 Smart alecks 

26 Bailed-out 
insurance co. 

27 Cousin of 
-ette 

28 Garment 
with a watch 
pocket 

30 German city 
on the Rhein 

31 Swinger's 
stat 

32 Little fellow 

33 Cry — 
River" 

35 Shielded 
37 Milk, in Cadiz 
40 Riddle. 

part 2 
45 Dual radio 

designation 

47 Manfred of 
rock 

48 Final Greek 
letter 

49 Pal. in 
Cannes 



Super Crossword the taking 



50 Sub meat 
53 Northern 

French city 
55 Spurred on 
58 Riddle, 

part 3 
62 Hem and — 



107 — Lanka 

108 — Paul's 
(frozen fish 
brand) 

109"— pro 
nobis" ("pray 
for us") 



63 Brewing tank 110 Cash cache 

64 Reverse or 113 Castro's land 



neutral 

65 No. in 
Scotland 

66 Borden's 
cow 

68 Line of 

Swanson 

meals 
73 Signs of 

fatigue 
77 Letters 

before Q 



115 Island of 
Hawaii 

117 2007 A.L. 
MVP 

118 British lav 

119 Former Big 
Apple mayor 
La Guardia 

122 Riddle's 
answer 
126 Spiritual 
being 



79 Figure skater 127 Soft pillow f 



Lipinski 
80 Even if, 
informally 

82 — polloi 

83 Riddle, 
part 4 

90 Philanthropic 
giver 

91 Free-for-all 

92 Attend to 

93 Hoppy quaff 

94 Persian- 
founded 
religion 

97 Fella 
99 Fed Eliot 
100 End of the 

riddle 
106 Shorthand 
whiz 



128 Waiting for a 
phone agent 

129 Part of a 
U.S. political 
map 

130 Very thick, 
as fog 

131 Very little 

DOWN 

1 Really 
battling 
it out 

2 Sir, in 
colonial India 

3 Character 
defects that 
cause 

protagonists' 
downfalls 



4 Show biz 
rep: Abbr. 

5 "Harry Potter 
and the 
Goblet of 
Fire" director 
Mike 

6 Lacking a 
key center, 
in music 

7 Gomer of TV 

8 Directed 

9 Prince — 
Khan 

10 Hungarian's 
neighbor 

11 Little 
grimace 

12 It's a shore 
thing 

1 3 Here, in Haiti 

14 Robin's face 
wear 

15 Ocular ring 

16 Young oinker 

17 Speak 
articulately 

18 Bit of 
sunlight 

19 Naval vessel 
abbr. 

24 Stop 

blocking, as 

a river 
29 Noah's 

eldest son 

33 See 96- 
Down 

34 Bored feeling 
36 "Eat up!" 

38 "Iliad" author 

39 Sooner city 



41 Amo, amas, 

42 Ranch pal 

43 Baboon, e.g. 

44 Religious law 

45 — crow flies 

46 India's Taj — 

51 Pack up and 
leave 

52 — wink 

54 Imprint on a 
hard surface 

56 Colored 
marker 
brand 

57 Brainchild 

59 Biblical suffix 

60 Golfer 
Snead 

61 "Mad About 
You" cousin 

67 Cuzco 
inhabitant 

69 Hagen with 
three Tonys 

70 Bread of 
India 

71 Wallaces 
canine 
sidekick 

72 To the — 
power 

74 Game fish of 
California 

75 Taboo deeds 

76 Autographs 
78 Delve into 
81 Use an ax 

on 

83 "Rooms — " 
(vacancy 
notice) 



84 "Just a 
moment" 

85 Devilkins 

86 Composer 
Edward 

87 Is very dizzy 

88 Didn't stay 

89 Chinese 
dynasty 

90 Poppas 

95 Insulin, e.g. 

96 With 33- 
Down, most 
of Turkey is 
in it 

98 Complete, 
briefly 

101 Accustoms 

102 Poet Bums 

103 Tex" actor 
Estevez 

104 Isaac 
Asimov 
classic 

105 Novelist 
Gordimer 

111 Hardware 
store buys 

112 Fungus- 
infested 

114 — mater 

116 Wahines' 
guitars 

117 "Give it—" 

119 Spruce kin 

120 Ending for 
opal 

121 Ovid's lang. 

123 End of a 
school URL 

1 24 Lively energy 

1 25 The woman 



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Trivid 

tCSt byHfi | 
Rodnguez 



1. LITERATURE: Who was Eng- 
land's first, unofficial poet laureate? 

2. MUSIC: Which musical group had 
a hit with "Penny Lane"? 

3. MEASUREMENTS: How many 
meters are in an "are," a unit of land 
measurement? 

4. INVENTIONS: Who invented 
frozen food in 1 923? 

5. GEOGRAPHY: Which countries 
share the region of Patagonia? 

6. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: 
What is the traditional birthstone asso- 
ciated with July? 

7. ASTRONOMY: The moon called 
Titan orbits which planet in our solar 
system? 

8. HISTORY: In what year did Ohio's 
National Guard kill four war protesters 
at Kent State University? 

9. MOVIES: Which Disney movie 
featured a character named Dory? 

10. RELIGION: Who is the patron 
saint of carpenters? 

Answers 

1 . Ben Jonson 

2. The Beatles 

3. 100 square meters 

4. Clarence Birdseye 

5. Argentina and Chile 

6. Ruby 

7. Saturn 

8. 1970 

9. "Finding Nemo" 

10. St. Joseph 

C 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. 



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The views expressed in this publication do not 

necessarily reflect those of 

The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions 

may be edited for clarity and length. 

Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters 

to the editor are welcome from anyone. 

All submissions become property of The Current 

Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be 

found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
October 17, 2012 



Southeastern sacks Demons, 27-22 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

There were plenty of shortfalls 
contributing to Northwestern 
State's 27-22 Southland Con- 
ference loss Saturday as Southeast- 
ern Louisiana remained perfect in 
league play. 

The Demons missed an extra point 
for the first time this season. They 
had a punt blocked for the second 
time in 2012. They lost dynamic re- 
turner/receiver/wildcat back Phillip 
Harvey to a knee injury shortly after 
halftime, and by then, last week's 
100-yard rusher, Rob Walker, was 
already sidelined with a blow to the 
back on his second carry. They were 
down to only two starting offensive 
linemen. Picking up two early turn- 
overs netted only three points. 

But the prevailing factor was the 
performance by the Lions (3-4 over- 
all, 3-0 in the Southland), whose 
three wins have come in conference 
games over McNeese, Lamar and 
now Northwestern (3-4, 1-2). 

"Give credit to Southeastern, they 
made the plays to win the game and 
we didn't, period. We had opportuni- 
ties we did not convert, we had plays 
in all three phases we did not make, 
and some of the reason why was that 
Southeastern made more plays than 
we did," said Demons' head coach 
Bradley Dale Peveto. 

NSU trailed by double digits three 
times, but a 1:1 5-long, 62-yard hur- 
ry-up drive ending with quarterback 
Brad Henderson's 8-yard keeper 
with 4:08 remaining brought the De- 
mons back within five points. But in 
keeping with the Demons' fortunes 
Saturday, an onside kick that wasn't 
called happened. SLU had 10 play- 
ers within 15 yards of the ball, and 
the kick was supposed to be chipped 
over the two lines of Lions, but De- 
mons' kicker John Shaughnessy hit 
it fat and the kick was fair 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Freshman running back Daniel Taylor breaks into the open field after 
catching a pass to score a touchdown. The Demons lost to SLU 27-22. 



caught by SLU. 

"You watch the PGA, the best 
golfers in the world hit it fat. Bad 
time for that to happen to us. Then 
Southeastern converted a fourth 
down and we weren't able to get the 
ball back until the last 20 seconds," 
said Peveto. 

NSU started the day without its 
starting right guard and tackle be- 
cause of injuries, and lost starting 
left tackle Larry Calcote midway 
through, just before Harvey was 
felled, taking away a player leading 
the Southland and 10th nationally in 
all-purpose yards ( 1 70 per game). 

"I'm not going to make excus- 
es about injuries costing us in this 
game. If somebody goes out, some- 
body else has to step in and do the 
job," said Peveto. "That's football." 

Southeastern took charge with 
two straight long (75, 74 yards) scor- 
ing drives late in the first and early 
in the second quarter, going up 14-3. 
The Demons got a 4-yard Henderson 
pass to Corey Simmons 6:29 before 
halftime, but Shaugnessy's PAT hit 
the upright and bounced back to 



leave it at 14-9. SLU drove for 12 
plays to net a Seth Sebastian 22-yard 
field goal in the final minute of the 
half for a 17-9 advantage. 

Sebastian added a 30-yarder on 
SLU's first second-half series. The 
Demons answered with a 92-yard, 
nine-play drive capped by true fresh- 
man Daniel Taylor's 30-yard scam- 
per on a throwback pass from Hen- 
derson, getting within 20-15. 

After the Lions rolled up 233 
yards at halftime, nearly as many as 
NSU allowed in the entire game last 
week while beating Lamar, the De- 
mons stopped most of the bleeding 
in the final two quarters. 

"They had a lot of new wrinkles, 
a very high tempo, and they had us 
on our heels defensively in the first 
half," said Peveto. "We did a better 
job after halftime, on all but the one 
drive where they made a great catch 
(29 yards to Chris Malott) when we 
had perfect coverage." 

That came after Henderson lost 



For rest of story: check out 
www.nsudemons.com 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
The Lady Demons celebrate after winning a set against Southeastern in Prather Coliseum. 

Lady Demons improve streak 



Chris Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

The Lady Demons, 14-8, 6-4 
in conference, triumphed 
over both the Southeastern 
Lions (7-12, 2-7) and the Nicholls 
State Colonels (8-12, 3-6) last week. 

Sophomore Keelie Arneson was 
a key part of the Lady Demons' 3-1 
victory over the Southeastern Lions 
on Thursday night at Prather Colise- 
um. Arneson recorded a career high 
35 digs with 7 assists in the match. 

"She did a good job with keep- 
ing us in rallies," Hugh Hernes- 
man, Lady Demons co-head coach, 
said. "I thought she did a great job, 
passed really well and played great 



defense." 

Helping Arneson were sopho- 
more Stacey DiFrancesco with 17 
kills and 10 digs, and freshman Caiti 
O'Connell, with 16 kills. Freshman 
Glynna Johnson also got in on the 
Lady Demons' fierce attack with a 
.550 kill percentage. 

"It's a good start for us coming 
off of two losses last week," Hernes- 
man said. "One of our deficiencies 
from last week was the ability to kill 
the ball. Fifty-eight kills in only four 
sets is a good number for us." 

Saturday afternoon at Prather 
Coliseum the Lady Demons domi- 
nated again with a 3-0 victory over 
the Nicholls State Colonels. 

DiFrancesco played another ex- 



cellent match, recording 15 kills and 
10 digs. 

Hemesman said DiFrancesco 
wants to be great, is competitive and 
wanted the win, which drove her to 
playing great both Thursday and Sat- 
urday. 

Arneson tallied 2 1 digs with 4 as- 
sists, and O'Connell scored 10 kills. 
Johnson finished with the highest 
kill percentage in this match as well, 
finishing at .455. 

"The most important thing for us 
is that we recaptured our identity," 
Hernesman said. "We had a really 
good rhythm going." 



For rest of story: check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Enthusiastic fans enjoy preview of Demons, Lady Demons basketball team 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

Prather Coliseum was buzzing 
Monday night although the 
scoreboard wasn't in use, as the 
Northwestern State basketball 
teams staged brief intrasquad scrim- 
mages for the annual Tipoff Party 
and Select-A-Seat Event, capped by 
a buzzer-beating 30-foot 3-pointer 
by men's freshman guard Jalan West. 

"We had a great turnout. It was 
great for our fans to get out to see the 
Lady Demons and our team play," 
said Mike McConathy, beginning 



his 14th season as the Northwestern 
men's coach. "We had people driv- 
ing in from an hour or more and 
we're very appreciative of them and 
everybody who came out for a great 
event from start to finish." 

Fans enjoyed complimentary food 
and kids got a chance to play in in- 
flatables and have their faces painted 
before the focus turned to the bas- 
ketball court for the Lady Demons. 
After the scrimmages ended, players 
signed autographs for enthusiastic 
fans. 

"We just want to thank the fans 



for coming out," said first-year Lady 
Demons co-head coach Brooke 
Stoehr. "We were competing with 
Monday Night Football on TV, but 
we saw a lot of familiar faces, and a 
lot of new faces. We had a great turn- 
out from the student body. Hopefully 
our product at the end of the season 
in March will look quite a bit differ- 
ent than what we saw tonight. It's a 
process and we'll get there. 

"I'm just thrilled to see the turn- 
out and the support for women's 
basketball here," she said. "After we 
finished, it was fun watching Coach 



McConathy and his team get out 
there." 

The good turnout was beneficial 
for the teams, McConathy said. 

"We didn't accomplish a lot in 
terms of basketball, but it was good 
to get in front of a crowd and play 
through the jitters which is a real 
positive," he said. 

"It was a chance to get everybody 
on the floor. We have a lot way to 
go, a lot of work, but tonight it was 
about having fun, shooting a lot of 3s 
and not a lot of posting up or defend- 
ing very aggressively. I think our 



fans saw why we are excited about 
this team." 

Stoehr was able to spotlight three 
players who have shined since prac- 
tice began for the NSU women early 
this month. 

"We've had a couple young ladies 
who are setting the tone as to how to 
compete and be vocal leaders every 
day. Trudy Armstead and Tiandra 
Williams have really brought energy 
on a consistent basis. Janelle Perez 
has done a great job of running the 
point as a true freshman, and she will 
need to be more vocal, but that will 



come," said Stoehr. "Overall I'm 
pleased with their energy and effort, 
but after a really tough practice to- 
day just an hour ago, unfortunately 
we looked a little sluggish in this 
scrimmage." 

Both teams tip off the regular sea- 
son Nov. 9. 

The Demons play in Prather 
Coliseum against East Texas Bap- 
tist while the Lady Demons visit 
New Orleans, then open their home 
schedule Monday night, Nov. 12 
against Alcorn State. 



ports 

Roundup 



National Football League 

The Atlanta Falcons improve to 
6-0 by edging out the Oakland Raid- 
ers, 23-20. The team leads the NFL 
in the power rankings. 

Despite losing to the Green Bay 
Packers, the Houston Texans are in 
good shape. They fall one spot to 
No. 2 in the power rankings. 

The Giants jumped up four 
spots from No. 7 after beating the 
San Francisco 49ers, 26-3. 

National Basketball Association 

Miami Heat's Dwayne Wade 
hopes to play in the team's third 
preseason game Thursday against 
the Detroit Pistons. Wade played in 
the Heat's second preseason game 
against the Los Angeles Clippers. 



Dallas Mavericks superstar 
Dirk Nowitski hopes to escape 
having knee surgery. After a few pre- 
season games, the German forward's 
knee is swelling slighly. Nowitski 
believes reducing his workload will 
help him achieve this. 

Major League Baseball 

Jason Giambi could possibly be 
the next Colorado Rockies' manager. 
Giambi is set to meet with the 
organization, but no date for the 
meeting has been set. Giambi just 
completed his 1 8th season. He has a 
career batting avg. of .280 with 429 
homeruns. 

Soccer 

France's last ditch efforts were 
enough to even the score and draw 
against Spain. Spain delivered the 
first punch when Sergio Ramos 
scored on a rebound in the 26th min- 
ute. France's Olivier Giroud header 
pull the teams to even ground in the 
late minutes of the game. 



NCAAF FBS BCS standings 

No.l Alabama 
No.2 Florida 
No.3 Oregon 
No.4 Kansas State 
No.5 Notre Dame 
No.6 LSU 
No.7 South Carolina 
No.8 Oregon State 
No.9 Oklahoma 
No.10 USC 
No. 11 Georgia 
No.12 Mississippi State 
No. 13 West Virgina 
No.14 Florida State 
No.l 5 Rutgers 
No. 16 Louisville 
No. 17 Texas Tech 
No. 18 Texas A&M 
No.19 Clemson 
No.20 Standford 
No.21 Cincinnati 
No.22 Boise State 
No.23 TCU 
No.24 Iowa State 
No.25 Texas 



ATA 





: Buy One Meal, 
I Get One FREE! 

Good for any Lunch Menu items. Or for 
burritos, enchiladas, or combination 
items on Dinner Menu. 



ALL rOOT>, 

all -me TtMej 



10 9 South Dr . 
Natchitoches, LA 

Kids' - Vflgetanan Selections 




Want your own radio show? 

It's your lucky day, because KNWD can make it happen. 
All you have to do is fill out a DJ application. 

Pick up an application at our radio station, or print one 
from our webpage. 

Time slots for shows fill up fast, so sign your application 
today. 




The Demon 




Web Address: http://knwd.nsula.edu/ 
Email: knwdradio@gmail.com 
== ^/ Location: 109 Kyser Hall 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 




auce 

Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, October 24, 2012 « Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 7 



Louisiana Supreme Court visits NSU 



Compiled from News Bureau 
and Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

^he Supreme Court. Louisiana's 
highest court, heard four cases 
during a session held on campus 
last Thursday as the court sat before 
an audience of university and high 
school students, faculty, administra- 
tors and guests. 

The four cases addressed seizure 
and forfeiture of property, a hurri- 
cane-related insurance settlement, 
the finer points of statutes related to 
medical malpractice and damages re- 
sulting from product liability. 

"We are grateful to the court for 
providing this opportunity for our stu- 
dents, students in other schools and 
the community to see the court and 
the role it plays in our state," Dr. Ran- 
dall J. Webb, NSU President, said. 
"We welcome Louisiana's highest 
court to Louisiana's oldest city." 

Associate Justice Jeffrey Victory 
of Shreveport explained the functions 
and responsibilities of the court as the 
court of last resort in Louisiana that 
governs all state courts, looks after 
lawyers and makes decisions on the 
constitutionality of state laws. 

Victory noted that the Louisiana 
Supreme Court is one of the most 
advanced in the country regarding its 
electronic capabilities, maintaining a 
website and streaming court proceed- 
ings online. 

Victory acknowledged that as the 
state of Louisiana is commemorating 
its bicentennial in this year, the Loui- 
siana Supreme Court will commemo- 
rate its bicentennial in 2013. 

Webb said events like this are im- 
portant for students and faculty. 

"It is an honor for us to be a part of 
this," Webb said. "Only a few people 
can honestly say they have attended 
a Louisiana Supreme Court hearing, 
and for us to say that we have is an 
incredible thing. I stress civic engage- 
ment because it improves the equality 
of life and the community and also 
gives the students a better understand- 
ing and appreciation for the state and 
federal judicial system." 



One of the cases that interested stu- 
dents was Tina Viers v. The State of 
Louisiana. 

Viers was stopped while in a ve- 
hicle by a police officer because of 
improper lane usage. When the offi- 
cer noticed the defendant acted suspi- 
ciously, he asked to search the vehicle. 
The state's attorney said that when the 
officer searched the vehicle he found 
$144,350 in separate bundles in a se- 
cret floor compartment of the vehicle. 

When Viers was asked where the 
money came from and whom it was 
for, she said that the money did not 
belong to her. The money was then 
confiscated and tested for drug resi- 
due, which was found. Viers was ac- 
cused of being a part of a drug trans- 
action, but with no evidence. 

One of the justices noted that the 
money in her car and drug residue was 
insufficient evidence. 

The main argument from the de- 
fendant was that even though Viers 
initially signed a statement saying that 
she said the money was not hers, she 
also filed an affidavit at a later date 
claiming the money belonged to her. 
The State of Louisiana, argued that 
there was no evidence that the money 
belonged to Viers. 

The state's attorney said evidence 
showed she only earned $300 a week 
and had no savings, and at the end of 
the hearing, no judgment was made. 

Bailey Boles, a freshman nursing 
major, said she was excited to witness 
real cases and.his.tQry in the making. 

"I came to this event for my politi- 
cal science class, not really expecting 
anything to gain or to bring to it, but 
when I left I learned so much from it 
and I am very grateful that I attend- 
ed," Boles said. 

Marcus Jones, vice president of 
university affairs, said it was an honor 
for the university to be selected for 
this court session. Jones said such 
events are important for students to 
be involved with the community and 
to learn about political and current 
events. 

"The university is the heart of 
Natchitoches, and our students are the 
future of it," Jones said. 




Photo Courtesy of News Bureau 

From left to right: Justice Greg G. Guidry, Justice Jeannette Theriot Knoll, Justice Bernette J. Johnson, Chief Justice Catherine D. "Kitty" Kimball, 
Justice Jeffrey P. Victory, Justice John L. Weimer and Justice Marcus Clark. March 1, 2013 will mark the bicentennial of the Louisiana Supreme Court. 

"We are grateful 
to the court for 
providing this 
opportunity for 
our students, 
students in other 
schools and the 
community to see 
the court and the 
role it plays in our 
state. " 

-NSU President Randall Webb 

Photo Courtesy of News Bureau 
Before the Louisiana Supreme Court's visit last week, they last sat at NSU in 1986. The session was streamed on www.nsula. edu. 




Upcoming 
Homecoming 
Activities 

Wednesday, Oct. 24 

5k Run 
Student Union Breezeway 
3 p.m. - 5 p.m. 

Thursday, Oct. 25 

Lip Sync 
A. A. Fred ricks 
7 p.m. 

Friday, Oct. 26 

Parade & Pep Rally 5 p.m. 
Pep Rally/Award Ceremony 
Immediately afterwards down- 
town 

Saturday, Oct. 27 

Homecoming Football Game 
NSU vs. Nicholls State 
University 
Kick off 6 p.m. 
Turpin Stadium 



2012 presidential election to be a close race 



Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 

\A/ ith the presidential 

" " election only a few weeks 
away it seems more like a toss up 
because the race is as close as its 
ever been 

Greg Granger, professor of 
history and political science, 
provided some insight into the 
upcoming election. Granger sees 
how close the election is and 
believes that it will all come down 
to two things-Independents and 
voter turn out. 

"The race is too close to call at 
this point," Granger said. 

The Democrats had a lot of 
power in 2008, but have waned 
since then, and any polling data is 
just a snapshot neither candidate 
has any discernible lead right now. 
This leads it up to which party 



will have the higher turnout. If 
both parties are equally loyal and 
as well-matched as thought, then 
independents will play a much 
bigger role in this election. 

There's a record amount of 
Independents now. Granger 
believes this shows how weak the 
two main parties have become. 
Whichever way the Independents 
sway is the way the election will 
turn out. 

It makes swing states such 
as Ohio very valuable. There 
are several students at NSU 
who, while they may not be 
Independents, are still unsure 
on whom to cast their vote for. 
Senior Betsy Loyd is completely 
undecided. Loyd likes Obamacare 
but admits that she is concerned 
about the job market since she will 
be graduating soon. 

"The job market is one of 
Obama's weak points," Loyd said. 



Index 



2 Life 

6 Opinions 

7 Sports 



Wednesday Thursday 



6l%53° 



69°/56° 



Friday 

68/49° 



Senior Justin Woodard is also 
undecided but for completely 
different reasons. 

Woodard doesn't see any good 
points from either candidate. 
Woodard said that it is really hard 
to be accurately informed with so 
many biased news outlets. 

Granger and both students 
agreed that potential vice 
presidents aren't that important in 
the election. Granger believes that 
in this election vice presidential 
candidates, Biden and Ryan are 
merely reinforcing a person's 
decision to pick a presidential 
candidate rather than actually 
bringing in new votes. 

James LaCour, a freshman in 
electronic engineering, is going to 
be voting for Romney this year. 

LaCour appreciates that 
Romney comes from a financial 
background and believes that this 
will allow Romney to get America 



out of debt. 

He believes Obama could just 
further the debt and that it could 
lead to something equivalent to the 
Great Depression. 

Ron Walter, a freshman CIS 
major, prefers to side with Obama 
mainly because of his views on 
taxes and healthcare. 

Most of the students 
interviewed had seen all, or at least 
clips, of the debates. 

Granger said that both 
candidates were entertaining with 
high passion levels. 

"In the second presidential 
debate, Obama had to beat both 
Romney and himself in terms of 
style and substance," Granger said. 

With both parties being so close 
to potential votes, these debates 
really mattered to those states that 
were close to the middle for swing 
states like Ohio. Granger believes 
that Louisiana isn't a swing state, 



and it is most likely that Romney 
will win the vote for Louisiana. 

With the race this close, every 
vote counts. Votes matter every 
election but Granger said that this 
year it is more crucial than ever 
if you want your candidate to 
become the next President of the 
United States of America. 



PRESIDENTIAL 

2£I2 



Election Day 
2012 

Vote Nov. 6 



Saturday 

56740° 



Sunday 

44736° 



Monday 

42736° 



Tuesday 

47734° 



4 




Q&A with the 




Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
October 24, 2012 



and Queen 



Meet Homecoming King 
Kiley Louviere 

Age: 

21 

Classification and Major: 

Senior, psychology major 
Campus Involvement: 

Freshman year I was in the PLP program arid had a small stint with the 
Freshman Factor committee for the Student Activities Board. At the same 
time, I decided to pledge the Kappa Sigma Fraternity. That spring, I was a 
Freshman Connector. Sophomore year I didn't do much until that spring 
when I was appointed president of Kappa Sigma. That summer I w as also 
in Demon VIP, but because of absences I was appointed event coordinator 

for the Freshman Connection program. 

Favorite color: 

Blue and orange are pretty much tied for me. 
Favorite food: 

Anything that is homecooked (especially gumbo! ) 
Favorite movies: 

"Forgetting Sarah Marshall'' and 'Tour Brothers" 
Favorite TV show: 

None ^"*s^f 
Favorite actor and/or actress 

Mark Wahlberg 

Favorite band/musician/song 

John Mayer 

One thing you couldn't live without: 

I could not live without my cellphone... that's how I seem to get most of 
my work done. 

What's your favorite thing about NSU? Why? 

My favorite thing about NSU is how close everyone is. The faculty 
actually know who YOU are, so no one person is just a face. You actually 
mean something to the people that run this university. 

W hat's your favorite part of homecoming? 

My favorite part is getting to spend the late nights with everyone working 
on the float and JLirJ'5vnc. i The final pw5dllt^«abe.tr^er^e^k^»K1ft^ ivh^c,^. 




Homecoming 2012 King Kiley Lqu 



Meet Homecoming 
Queen Afton Owens 

Age: 

21 

Classification and Major: 

Senior secondary English education major 
Campus Involvement: 

I have been involved in Phi Mu Fraternity. I was the philanthropy 
chairman, vice president and 1 currently serve as president I was a 
Freshman Connector for two consecutive years. I was a member of 
the Student Activities Board where I serv ed as a represetative at large, 
secretary, treasurer and the special events coordinator. I am a member of 
Blue Key, Sigma Lambda and Order of Omega Honor Societies. I was 
named the 201 1 Greek Woman of the Year. I work in the Office of First 

Year experience, and I was a presidential ambassador. 

Favorite color 

Purple /^/^Ni rVK V^v* 

Favorite food: 

I love ALL food, but if 1 have to choose... chili cheese dogs! 
Favorite movies: 

"Sex and the City" and "'Star Trek" r \ 

Favorite TV show: <** w ** 

"Sex and the City" ^i**"* *^**"^ 
Favorite actor and/or actress: 
Chris Pine and Reese Witherspoon 
Favorite band/musician/song 

I love every song that comes on K-LOVE. My favorite artist is probably 
Matthew West! 

One thing you couldn't live without: 

Books! I Love to read! 

What's your favorite thing about NSU? Why? 

I love that my entire family attended this university. It really allows us 
to bond over the history and tradition of NSU because it has become a 

tradition for my family. I love the colors of course! 

-What's your favorite part of homecoming? 

I really love Homecoming Week, but if I had to pick a favorite part it 
wciilld tte'garhe day.'Yhe tailgate, the alumni and families, the food and 
football, that is what homecoming is all about! 



_ 




Photo by Jacob Labutka 



Junior Aaron McConnell shows his NSU Pride through his shirt and wall calendar. 

Showing school spirit through colors 

w 




ell 

fellow- 
Demons, 

it would 

appear that it is m/k. 

Homecoming . . T , . 

e Jacob Labutka 

Week once _ , „ , 

Stvle Columnist 

again. There 
is an event 

every day, the Homecoming 
Court is crowned and the 
stadium lights oversee our 
football team vying for victory. 
To commemorate this annual 
week, one should show their 
pride by wearing glamorous 
attire in our school colors-purple 
and white. 

I'm not saying that you have 
to wear the newest purple and 
white gown from Sak's (if that 
happens to be in your closet then 
I am quite impressed). However, 
you should take a peek in their 
closets to see what you have to 
work with. 

For starters, let's tackle the 
subject of pride-colored shoes. 
Do not be tricked by the purple 
eff-brand converse at Wal-Mart 
for they bear the mark of LSU 



and their tiger. I've seen many 
of my fellow students wearing 
(real) purple converse (which 
I happen to own a pair of). 
Perhaps now is the time to either 
pull them out of your closet or 
give yourself an excuse to buy a 
pair. 

There's also a great variety 
of purple tops that are really 
cute and should be included in 
everyone's w ardrobe. If you can 
find a purple top w ith white to 
complement then that's great, 
but it should at least be purple 
since that's the color that pops 
(purple power). 

Granted, I am biased because 
purple happens to be my favorite 
color, but it's always a good idea ■ 
to have clothes that match your 
school. 

Finding purple pants is a 
feat that is harder to accomplish 
then finding a purple and white 
top or pair of shoes. However, 
if you happen to own a pair and 
wear them this week, then you'll 
be showing your pride and be 
fashionably distinguished. 

Even if you do not heed the 



adv ice of w hat to to wear during 
the week, the best opportunity 
to show your purple pride is at 
the Homecoming Game. This is 
the time to go crazy with your j 
school spirit and wear what you 
couldn't in class or at work. 

The most frequently 
employed option to wear school 
colors at football games is for 
buff males to paint their chests. 
Howev er, most of us are not buff 
males and must find other ways 
to wear our colors. 

A way to Stand out and not. 
be half naked is temporary hair 
dye. Buy some purple and white 
spray-on hair dye and show your 
school spirit by alternating the 
■ purple and white dyes on your, 
■hair (get orange hair dye if you 
want to display our secondary 
color and really stand out). 

After this week has passed 
make sure you continue to 
diversify your outfits in both 
color and style. But always 
remember where you are getting 
your education and show your 
spirit and support on Purple 
Friday! 



Faculty members remember their NSU homecoming 



Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 

Homecoming is not just for 
students. Alumni remember 
their homecoming at NSU 
as an undergraduate. 

Arthur Dew experienced past 
Homecomings much like today. 
Dew is a communications instructor 
and advisor for KNWD, the campus 
radio station. He graduated NSU in 
1965 with a bachelor's degree. 

"I remember Homecoming Week 
as an exciting week," Dew said. 

His homecoming experiences 
are similar as today's homecoming 
events, which include the football 
game, pep rallies, parades and 
Homecoming Court. 

Yet, many of the other traditions 
have been lost over time such as 
daily pep rallies and homecoming 
dances. 

Tailgating is one tradition that 
has been added. Dew said students 
would celebrate homecoming at 
home with family and friends 
and then go out to the game. 
Cheerleaders would put together 
pep rallies throughout the week, 
with the grand finale pep rally held 
on Friday at Natchitoches riverfront. 

Dew was a speech major, now 
called communications. He helped 
promote homecoming on KNOC. 
KNOC was a Natchitoches radio 
station located downtown because, 
then, there was no KNWD. 



The Current Sauce 
staff congratulates the 
2012 Honor Court! 



For homecoming games, 
students dressed up. "We would 
wore a coat and tie, and you bought 
your date a mum," Dew said. 

A mum is a corsage that men 
wore in their front pocket, or girls 
wore on their dress. 

After the game, the students 
would attend the Homecoming 
Dance. The dance was the most 
exciting part of homecoming to 
Dew, besides the homecoming 
game. 

"I like to dance, and we danced," 
Dew said. 

Homecoming dances didn't exist 
for Misti Adams, a 1999 graduate. 

Adams is an instructor and 
advisor for academic career and 
engagements instructor and advisor. 

During her college career, she 
w as a part of Student Activity 
Board, Tri Sigma and Purple 
Jackets. As an involved student on 
campus, Adams helped put together 
homecoming events and floats. 

"It was a lot of fun, but a lot of 
w ork." Adams said. 

Like Dew, Adams remembers 
events, such as pep rallies, parades 
and poster contests. The football 
game was her favorite event. 

"It's a time for students to have 
fun and build tradition," Adams 
said. 

However, not all students could 
participate in homecoming events 
such as Jamie Flanagan, an advisor 
and instructor for Student Support 



Services. 

Flanagan didn't really get to 
participate in homecoming events' 
because she had to work her way 
through college. Just like Dew 
and Adams, Flanagan remembers 
football games, parades and pep 
rallies. 

"I would stop through, but I 
didn't stay long," Flanagan said. 
Flanagan reminisced about pep 
rallies and other homecoming 
events, and said if she were a 
student today she would attend 
events like Lip-Sync. 

"I think activities like that are 
fun and gives you a chance to come 
out of your box," Flanagan said. 

Dew said he w ished more 
students today w ould participate 
in Homecoming events more \ 
because students now : have more 
distractions like cell phones and 
computers. 

"We enjoyed the simple things," 
Dew said. 

However, Adams and Flanagan 
disagreed saying students show 
plenty of school spirit. 

Dew, Adams and Flanagan 
all said they enjoy homecoming 
because it's a time where students 
can interact with each other, meet 
old friends and just have fun. 

"I think it is important because 
it gives students a chance to show 
their school spirit," Flanagan said. 



MAYFIELD office supply 




Phone: 
318.3*7.00*4 

318.3*7.0063 

810 Keyscr Ave. 
Natchitoches 









Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
October 24, 2012 



Homecoming week kicks off with block party 




Photo by Josh Mitchell 

Some members of the 2012 Homecoming Honor Court pose for a picture at the Kick Off Block Party held in the Student Union Circle on Monday. 




Submitted Photo 

Students sit and enjoy music and food provided by the Student Activities Board. 



Photo by Josh Mitchell 

Students wait in line for custom made rings. This was just one of the novelties avalilable for students. 





Photo by Josh Mitchell 
Black shades prepare to be customized with paint at the block 
party activity station. 



Photo by Josh Mitchell 
Soloman Matthews embraces 
his inner songbird and sings 
along to the music. 



Photo by Yonna Pasch 
Jake Bryan is caught by the 
munching on a hotdog by the 
refreshment table. 




Page 4 The Current Sauce October 24, 2012 



Good Luck Demons!!' 



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October 24, 2012 The Current Sauce Page 5 



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Schedule of Events 

Thursday, October 25 

All Day Alumni Art Show 

Hanchey Gallery (on display through Friday) 

Friday, October 26 

1 9:00 a.m. Alumni Association Board Meeting 

Red River Waterway Commission Building 

1 0:30 a.m. NSU Foundation Board Meeting 

Red River Waterway Commission Building 

Noon Homecoming Golf Tournament 

NSU Recreation Complex 

5:30 p.m. Homecoming Parade & Pep Rally 

The Homecoming parade will begin promptly at 5:30 
p.m., departing campus through the main gates of the 
Northwestern State onto Second Street, turning east 
on Rue Touline and proceeding down Rue Beauport 
to the Fleur de Lis stage on Natchitoches's downtown 
riverbank. Numerous student organizations will be 
riding colorful floats and throwing goodies to parade- 
goers. The pep rally on the riverbank will feature 
performances by spirit groups and dancers and an 
introduction to the Homecoming Court and senior 
football players. 

6:30 p.m. Long Purple Line Cocktail Hour 

Student Union Lobby 

7:00 p.m. Demon Tennis Reunion Reception 

Health & Human Performance gymnasium 

7:30 p.m. Long Purple Line Dinner & Induction Ceremony 

Student Union Ballroom 

The President's Distinguished Service Award winner, 
the Graduate N Club, Hall of Distinguished Educators 
inductees and School of Business Hall of Distinction 
honorees will also be recognized. 



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505 FRONT STREET 
H NATCHITOCHES, LA* 318-354-8222 ^| 

************* 



Visit our new website at 



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Saturday, October 27 

8:00 a.m. Homecoming 5K Fun 
Run/1 Mile Dog Walk 

Collins Pavilion 

9:00 a.m. N Club Hall of Fame 
Induction 

Magale Recital Hall 

1 0:00 a.m. NSU Recruiter's Reception and Open House 

-Student Services Center 

1 0:00 a.m. College of Education & Human Development 
Reunion - TEC 

(Hall of Distinguished Educators Induction Ceremony) 

1 0:30 a.m. B.A.A. Brunch & Membership Drive 

Student Union, President's Room 214 

1 1 :00 a.m. School of Business Reception 

Russell Hall, Natchitoches Room 
(School of Business Hall of Distinction Induction) 

Noon Demon Regiment Open House 

James A. Noe Military Science Building 

1 :00 p.m. Tailgating Activities 

Collins Pavilion/Demon Commons 
(Entertainment to be provided by the 
Glenn Rainey Band) 
5:30 p.m. Pregame Activities 
Turpin Stadium 
(Honorees will be recognized) 

6:00 p.m. Northwestern State vs. Nkholls State 

Turpin Stadium "Battle of the NSUs" 

7:30 p.m. Halftime Ceremonies 

Turpin Stadium 
(Honorees will be recognized) 




Best of Luck! 

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pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
October 24, 2012 



NSU 

Speaks 



What is your 
favorite memory of 
Homecoming here 
at Northwestern 
State University? 




in 




"J was in the band my 
freshman and sophomore 
year, and I actually really- 
enjoyed being involved 
and being in the parade. 
I was also on a float to 
represent my fraternity, 
Alpha Phi Alpha. " 

Robert Guidry 
graphic design, junior 



"My favorite Homecoming 
memory would probably 
be freshman year, the Lip 
Sync event. My wife, she 
was in it-before I knew 
her-and they did this thing 
for Saturday Night Live. It 
was just wonderful. 

Gary Dupree 
psychology, junior 



"My favorite Homecom- 
ing memory is probably 
the Lip Sync. I came out 
to support my friends and 
had a good time watching 
all of the performances. " 

Linda Ahlskog 
liberal arts, junior 



"My freshman year when 
we won Lip Sync. I'm a 
Phi Mu. so that was big 
deal for us because I never 
really got to do anything, 
but I always heard about 
it. It s just a big deal. We 
all worked really hard for 
it, and it was really fun to 
celebrate with my sisters. " 

Victoria Hippler 
nursing, senior 



Sleepless week with dorm neighbors from hell 



When I moved to college, 
I expected all of the 
stereotypes. I expected 
the good ones and the bad ones. I 
had hoped to become friends with 
everyone on my floor. All of 
that changed within the first 
two weeks of school. 

My room was quite 
loud during the first week 
of school. I'm a freshman, 
and I get loud. After we 
(my roommates and I) 
all chilled out and got 
the crazy college jitters 
out our systems, we noticed our 
neighbors started to get louder. 

My roommate and I would 
wake up around 6:30 a.m. to hear 
singing- very loud singing. This 
was very loud, awful, the-chick- 
thought-she-was-Mariah-Carey 
singing. Also, late at night at around 
1 1 p.m., the room closest to ours 
would get loud. 




Camille Mosley 

Freshman Scholar 



I'm not sure if they were just 
talking amongst themselves, 
playing a game or talking on the 
phone. I don't know. One day, my 
roommate and I got sick of it. We 
were watching a movie 
when we couldn't hear the 
movie anymore. 

Not wanting to disturb 
our other roommates but 
turning up the volume 
on the television, we 
decided to be the bigger 
people and go speak 
to our neighbors. They 
had previously banged on the wall 
in order to shush us a few nights 
before, so we decided to talk this 
out. 

We expressed our concerns, 
apologized for being loud the 
previous weeks and then went about 
our business. For a few weeks there 
was harmony in the halls. Then, 
about a week ago, the noise started 



to escalate again. They would get 
louder and louder, later and later at 
night. 

Right when I wanted to file 
a noise complaint, one of my 
roommates told me that the RA 
lived next door. Great. How do I 
make a noise complaint when one 
of the people doing all the noise is 
the RA? To make matters worse, 
she was the singing chick. 

So, I decided to take matters into 
my own hands. I have an 8 a.m. 
class on Mondays, Wednesdays' , 
and Fridays, so I get up at sevei ' 
Around 6:30 a.m., the singing . , 
began. I value, toy sleep, so at 7, 

and pounded on the wall. , , . j jirf is 
, ; , T^t,shut^jet,ui3. 1 iitadn't heard I 
isingingin-gni'tiiliKiri oj asrfil Bfned 
Astofilastifcridayj J. hadn't slept* art 
forWirei days! strbighi becauseuyf 'i 1 f 
varilews^edsbhs,' but dls^t^caristJ'Of j 
the^HdxTous'fl'bfse eWhgttom 



the other side of my walls because 
at 12:30 a.m., I heard screams 
of laughter coming from the 
neighbor's room. They were playing 
some card game at 1 2:30 a.m. like 
there wasn't anyone else to worry 
about. I was exhausted to the point 
of my eyes tearing up and burning. 

They sent me over the edge. No 
amount of banging could convey 
how much I needed them to shut up. 

So, I got out of bed, stomped out 
of my room, banged on their door, 
and proceeded to say in a most 
, angry voice that I had not slept in 
WAd$ys,,rQy eyes burned and were 
.tedringAJp from exhaustion, that 
M ncexted to be awake in lejs than 
, seVcnAtouts and asked ifthev could 

r>* -Thai sure Shut them up. After 
; thai. I couldn't fall back asleep. 
•.So nere Ianafrunning on virtually 
empty, but aPwppeful that there is 
{civility in die midst of stupidity. 



We need writers! 

Our newspaper 
needs stories 
written by students. 
Come by our office, 
227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join. 




Meetings every 
Monday at 
6:50 p.m. We hope 
to hear from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



[triad -^V.'-T'".! o:f ,f:^r(T 




: 








Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 




^^urrent 

^^^^^^< l LI c 


Chris Degeyter 

Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 




Jessica Blow 


Adviser 


Kirstie White 


Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 


Copy Editor 


JC Bryant 


News Editor 


Jacob Labutka 


Social Media 


,rj Alexis Reliford 


Lifestyle Columnist 


Camille Mosley 


Life Editor 


Andrea Nederostova 


Freshman Scholar 


Jimmie Walker 


Sauce Reporter 


Taylor Furr 


Sports Editor 


Contessa Wills 


Delivery Personnel 


Catherine Beverly 


Sauce Reporter 


Office phone 


Opinions Editor 


Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 


318-357-5456 



Letter Box KIT 

Place a letter in the empty boxes in such a way 
that each row across, each column down and each 
small 9-box square contains all of the letters listed 
above the diagram. When completed, the row 
indicated will spell out a word or words. 

ABCHKORTW 



H 




T 











K 






R 




H 






O 










C 






A 






T 






K 


W 




C 


H 















A 








C 


B 






K 








T 






K 


W 


C 




H 




R 




C 








R 




T 




H 























Catherine Beverly 

Opinions Editor 



Homecoming 
is never just 
about football 

Homecoming is decidedly 
one of the most important 
events in the fall semester 
of college. Although it differs from 
school to 
school, 
most w eeks 
center on 
a football 
game. 

The 
name 
comes 
from a 
tradition of 

having Homecoming Week fall after 
the football team returns from the 
away game that is the furthest aw ay. 
I never understood the significance 
of Homecoming. In high school it 
was about the dance and in college 
it seems to be more about the week 
of events before the game. 

The crowning of the 
Homecoming Queen and King 
is obviously important, as is the 
designation of the court, but I think 
the most important part of the week 
comes when the community comes 
to gather around the students and 
faculty of Northwestern. 

The Homecoming Parade is 
a fun university tradition that 
brings all of the students together. 
No matter the type of club or 
organization, everyone is invited to 
participate and represent a club. 

For the first two years of my 
stay here at Northwestern I wasn't 
involved in any clubs and because 
of that I was never interested in 
Homecoming. 

While everyone else was worked 
up over the hubbub I used the same 
excuse for missing every event: Lip 
Sync was too far out of the way, 
there was too much traffic to go see 
the parade and the banners hanging 
up weren't on my normal route. 

This year I'm involved in a lot 
more on campus, which gives me 
a better reason to see some of the 
more interesting Homecoming 
events. 

The "superhero" theme of 
this week is bound to be pretty 
awesome. 

I'm expecting great things from 
the Lip Sync, as always. 

It's a favorite of my friend and 
apparently a lot of fun. 

A club I participate in was 
planning on taking part in the 
banner event and having a float 
in the parade, but Homecoming 
seemed to sneak up on us. While 
we're sad to be missing out, we 
are more than happy to enjoy the 
product of everyone else's hard 
work. 

For a lot of students, this w eek is 
almost more important socially than 
athletically. I know a lot of people 
who talk more about the events than 
about the football game. 

I'm not saying our Demons don't 
deserve support and praise, but 
this is a time when we can turn our 
attention to some of the less well- 
known campus activities. 

I hope students on the 
Natchitoches campus get a chance 
to come out and support NSU in 
any way they can whether that 
is by participating in the events 
or attending them. The thing this 
campus is missing the most is the 
involvement of its students in more 
than academic areas. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 

The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 

Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 

All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
October 24, 2012 



Football player spends summer researching cure for cancer 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Staff Reporter 

Modest is a suitable word 
that describes NSU kicker 
and punter John Shaugh- 

nessy. 

Last year he was the only player 
to score against the LSU Tigers. 
Yet, he feels like he is not good 
enough to make it to the NFL. His 
dream is to change people's lives. 

Shaughnessy, a 2 1 -year-old se- 
nior biology major from 
Shreveport, spent this 
summer doing a research 
internship at Louisiana 
State University Health 
Science Center (LSUH- 
SC). 

Shaughnessy w orked on a 
breast and colon cancer research 
with his mentor Dr. Kevin Pruitt 
who is an assistant professor at 
LSUHSC. 

"This summer 1 spent time in 
Shreveport at LSUHSC doing a 
research internship," Shaughnessy 
said. "It was a 10-week internship 
for Louisiana Biomedical Research 
Network." 

"I did some actual cancer 



research. My project inv olved Wnt 
signaling pathway," Shaughnessy 
said. 

Shaughnessy had an opportu- 
nity to choose which research he 
was interested in the most because 
there were different options to 
choose from. 

After reading quick summaries 
of all researches that were offered, 
Shaughnessy decided to cooperate 
with Pruitt. 

"I got to choose between about 
30 different men- 
tors," he said. "Not 
really choose but 
I got to select dif- 
ferent ones, and if 
they chose me I got 
to do my research 
with them. Dr. Kevin Pruitt chose 
me after I chose him. My field was 
actually epigenetics." 

"I chose breast and colon 
cancers because I really liked what 
Dr. Pruitt was doing. Every mentor 
had short abstract of their research 
and his seemed like the coolest, I 
really liked it," Shaughnessy said. 

The findings of their research 
were too little to help find a cure 
for breast or colon cancers, but the 




whole research was a great experi- 
ence for Shaughnessy who hopes 
to get in medical school this year 
and enroll in the fall of the next 
year. 

"I did not publish anything 
but I made a poster, and I went 
to present it to Baton Rouge," he 
said. "The presentation went well. 
I had to present to different faculty 
from LSU, and couple surrounding 
schools like Tulane." 

Shaughnessy tries to be a great 
example of a student-athlete. He 
tries to be proactive in everything 
he does. 

"My life ambition is to be a 
successful physician one day," 
Shaughnessy said. "I really would 
like to be able one day to have my 
own type of practice and be able 
to, as cliche as it sounds, be able to 
change people's lives — that would 
be awesome." 

"But I would also 
love to be able to 
continue to play 
football 
and put off 
medical school 
for a couple years," 
Shaughnessy said. 





John Shaughnessy 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Caiti O'Connell spikes the ball past two blockers. O'Connell was named SLC Player of the Week. 

Lady Demons dominant at home 



Chris Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

The Lady Demons (16-8, 8-4) 
completed a streak of four 
home wins with victories over 
conference rivals Lamar (9-17, 1-11) 
and McNeese (6-19, 1-11). 

The Lady Demons started with 
a strong 3-1 win against the La- 
mar Cardinals on Thursday night at 
Prather Coliseum. 

After narrowly losing the first set 
24-26, the Lady Demons bounced 
back and won the next three sets in a 
row, 25-19, 25-15 and 25-18. 

Freshman Caiti O'Connell had 
a dominant performance to lead the 
team against the Cardinals, tallying 
1 7 kills with a .367 kill percentage. 

"O'Connell is the Player of the 
game, by a lot," Lady Demons co- 
head Coach Hugh Hernesman said. 

"We just had some good hit- 
ting reps in practice this week," 
O'Connell said. "We had good pass- 
ing, great sets and it all just worked 
out for us in the end." 



Sophomore Emily Sweet was 
a major contributor to those great 
passes and sets, recording eight 
digs and 40 assists throughout the 
match. Sophomores Stacey DiFran- 
cesco and Vanessa Coleman helped 
O'Connell on the attacking side, re- 
cording 1 1 kills and seven kills re- 
spectively. 

The Lady Demons proceeded into 
another game in which they crushed 
the McNeese Cowgirls 3-0 on last 
Saturday night in Prather Coliseum. 

The Lady Demons dominated the 
entire match against the Cowgirls 
and won the three sets 25-13, 25-9 
and 25-16. 

Once again O'Connell was the 
leader of the Lady Demons offense 
with 14 kills and a personal best .700 
kill percentage. DiFrancesco also 
recorded her own personal best kill 
percentage with 10 kills and a .692 
kill percentage. 

"As a group, us hitting .414 is a ri- 
diculous number," Hernesman said. 
"For both O'Connell and DiFrances- 
co to almost hit .700 as a tandem on 



the outside is just unheard of." 

Sophomore Keelie Ameson and 
DiFrancesco led the team in digs 
with 1 3 and seven respectively. 
Sophomore Emily Sweet was the 
Lady Demons assist leader with 36 
assists. 

"They were out of system the 
whole time, so they were scram- 
bling, and we were eliminating op- 
tions for them," Hernesman said. 
Hernesman is assured that the team 
will continue to play the way which 
has brought them success in previ- 
ous games. 

"I think we need to just continue 
doing what we're doing." Coach 
Hernesman said. "We have a really 
determined group. I have confidence 
in the way we're approaching the 
season. We're on the right path." 

The Lady Demons will take 
these wins as well as the two previ- 
ous home wins and go back on the 
road to face the Nicholls Colonels in 
Thibodaux at 6:30 pm. on Thursday 
and the Southeastern Lions in Ham- 
mond at 7:00 pm. on Saturday. 




First in, last out: The life of a trainer 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Sauce Reporter 

They start working before all 
athletes and coaches come to 
practice, and their work is done 
long after everybody else leaves. 

They are athletic trainers, and 
their job is extremely important for 
athletics. 

A 14-year-old boy from Ala- 
bama likes to plan things ahead, but 
he is not sure what he wants to do for 
living later in life. He loves baseball, 
but he thinks he is not too good in it. 

He wants to be a veterinarian, 
but he is afraid to get bit by animals. 
Then, he considers being a video 
game designer, but there are too 
many science and engineering things 
involved. 

One day, he is watching The At- 
lanta Braves playing and their pitch- 
er gets hurt on the field. Suddenly, 
one guy comes running out to check 
on the pitcher — his name is Jeff Por- 
ter-and he is the athletic trainer for 
the Braves. Leslie Oglesby thinks 
to himself, "what is this guy doing? 
what is his job? I want to do that!" 

Oglesby has been an athletic 
trainer at NSU for nearly three years. 
While working on getting a master's 
degree in health promotion, Oglesby 
has worked with volleyball, tennis 
and baseball teams as a graduate as- 
sistant. This year, his primary sport 
to work with is Softball, and he also 
oversees cross country, track and 
field and baseball. 

"In the past, I have always been 
a big baseball fan," Oglesby said. "I 
have always loved to deal with base- 
ball. I have had that honor to work 
with baseball last year at NSU." 

Being a trainer is a very time-con- 
suming job. Working hours depend 
on what sport the trainer works with, 




Photo by Andrea Nedorostova/Current Sauce 
Athletic trainer Leslie Oglesby gives treatment in the Athletic 
Fieldhouse to Softball player Cheyenne DelaGarza-Stills. 



and they change every day. Some- 
times, athletic trainers have to work 
seven days a week because injured 
athletes require treatment every day. 

"I have days when I'm here 
around here 5:30 a.m. and did not 
leave until 10 p.m.," Ogelsby said. 

Ogelsby explained that long work 
doesn't happen too often. 

A regular day for him is from 8 
a.m. to 6.30 p.m. 

Oglesby explains that even though 
no injuries are the same, there are 
steps he takes to ensure the athlete's 
safety. 

"First of all, we do preventions 
of injuries. We make sure that the 
field is safe, and we make sure that 



the athletes are at their best," Ogles- 
by said. "We try to prevent injuries 
from happening. If the injuries do 
unfortunately happen, then we are 
trained in immediate diagnosis of 
first aid care of those injuries. We 
also do rehabilitation — strengthen- 
ing , improving range of motion, re- 
ducing pain and all these things that 
you need to do in order to have an 
athlete ready to return back to play." 

"Right now my future goals are 
to go back to school for a doctorate 
degree and become a professor so 
I can teach other people who want 
to become athletic trainers and who 
have the same passion like I do." 



: Buy One Meal, 
ULj Get One FREE! 

a Good for any Lunch Menu items. Or for 

■ burritos, enchiladas, or combination 

■ items on Dinner Menu. 



ALU 



t o9 South Dr . 
Natchitoches, LA 

— ASthehtic Mexican Recipes 
Kids' MrZ' V^etamn Sd* 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
October 24, 2012 




Photos by Gary Hardamon 

The Demons run onto the field before the start of the game. This Saturday, the Demons face off against Nicholls State in a battle for the "Real NSU Trophy." 

Demons ready to face Nicholls 



Chris Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

After an open week, the 
Northwestern State Demons 
(3-4, 1-2 in conference) are 
ready to face the Nicholls 
State Colonels (1-5, 0-3). 

Coming off of a tough 22-27 
conference loss on the road to the 
Southeastern Lions before the off 
week, the Demons looked for some 
rest and relaxation before the up- 
coming game with the Colonels. 

"We actually did nothing about 
Nicholls State for about three days," 
Bradley Dale Peveto, fourth-year 
Demon head coach, said. "We went 
Demons on Demons. To get our 
guys fresh, we stayed away from 
any videos or walkthroughs. It was 



literally just practice. The reason for 
that was to get our guys fresh." 

Peveto plans to implement a 
strategy. against Nich- 
olls throughout this 
week. 

Peveto said the 
Colonels are a strong 
football team regardless 
of their record and with 
the rivalry between the 
Demons and the Colo- 
nels. 

He expects Nicholls 
State to be one of their 
toughest opponents of the 
season despite a 1 -5 record. 

But the Demons will 
have to win that dogfight 
w ithout one of their biggest 
offensive weapons, senior 



wide receiver Philip Harvey. 

Harvey was injured in the game 
against the Southeast- 
ern Lions. 

Harvey was the 
team's leading re- 
ceiver with 3 14 yards 
and two touchdowns 
on 23 catches. 

He had also 
begun to run as a 
quarterback in the 
wildcat forma- 
tion this season, 
where he reached 
101 yards and a 
touchdown in just 
jk W 12 carries. 
» Hk "We have a 

good plan," 
Peveto said. "We have a lot of good 




players. We have a 'next man in' 
concept, which means we don't fret 
over injury." 

"We hurt more for Phil than we 
do the team. iThe team definitely 
will miss him and it's very upset- 
ting, but with the 'next man in' 
concept somebody has to step up 
and get it done and somebody will. 
We've got a great plan going right 
now that will be revealed on game 
day." 

The Demons are 3-0 at Turpin 
Stadium this season, a strong devia- 
tion from recent years in which the 
Demons typically finished with a 
strong away record but an abysmal 
home record. 

Peveto attributes this to the 
NSU students and fans. He says 
Demon fans responded to his call to 



arms at the beginning of the season 
and are showing up to cheer on the 
Demons. 

The Demons are hoping to come 
away with a win against the Colo- 
nels heading into this final stretch of 
games. 

After the Colonels, the Demons 
have three more Southland Confer- 
ence games to finish out the season. 

The Demons are still in the 
hunt for the Southland Conference 
Championship, and a win against 
the Colonels would be a solid start 
toward climbing back up to the top. 

The Demons will face the 
Colonels at 6:00 pm. on Saturday at 
Turpin Stadium. 

The Demons bested the Colonels 
in their last meeting, 34-0. 



>5 



ports 

Roundup 



National Football League 

The Green Bay Packers have 
improved over .500 for the first 
time this season with a dominant 
30-20 performance against the St. 
Louis Rams. 

The New Orleans Saints got 
their second win of the season 
over division rival Tampa Bay 
Buccaneers with a 35-28 victory 
and move up to second in the NFC 
South. 

Major League Baseball 

The San Francisco Giants man- 
aged to fight back from a 1-3 defi- 
cit to win the NLCS 4-3 over the 
St. Louis Cardinals. They move 
on to face the Detroit Tigers in the 
World Series. 

National Basketball Association 

The New Orleans Hornets lost 
to the Dallas Mavericks on Mon- 
day night, 74-87. The Hornets and 
the Mavericks are now both 3-3 in 
the preseason. 

The Los Angeles Lakers fell 
to 0-6 in the preseason on Sunday 
night with a 92-99 loss against the 
Sacramento Kings, who are 4-1 in 
the preseason. 

Soccer 

Manchester United came back 
to defeat Braga 3-2 after starting 
the game 0-2. 

Christiano Ronaldo leads the 
Champions League with four 
goals, while 1 5 others are tied for 
second with two each. 

NCAAF FBS BCS standings 

No.l Alabama 
N«.2 Ffjpjada 2 ni<- 
No.3 Kansas State 
No.4 Oregon , 
No.5 Notre Dame 
!>Q.<j LSU 
No.7 Oregon State 
No.8 Oklahoma 
No.9 USC 
No. 10 Georgia 
No. 11 Mississippi State 
No.l 2 Florida State 
No. 13 South Carolina 
No. 14 Texas Tech 
No. 15 Rutgers 
No.l 6 Louisville 
No. 17 Stanford 
No.18 Clemson 
No. 19 West Virginia 



Groundbreaking for NSU softball grandstand set for Saturday 

Courtesy of Sports Info: 



A groundbreaking ceremony is 
set for 2 p.m. on Saturday, 
Oct. 27, during Northwest- 
ern State's Homecoming 
festivities to commemorate the start 
of construction of a new grandstand 
and press box facility at the Lady 
Demon Softball Complex. 

The public is invited to the cer- 
emony, which will be followed by a 
tailgating party in the Bank of Mont- 
gomery Outfield Club area of the 
stadium. 

The day will culminate with the 
NSU Demons' football game at 6 in 
Turpin Stadium against in-state rival 
Nicholls State. 

The S466.000 project is funded 
by a combination of private gifts 
and student fees designated and ap- 
proved for improvements to NSU 
Athletics facilities, said director of 
athletics Greg Burke, who empha- 
sized that no state or university op- 
erating dollars will be used for the 
project. 

Demolition of the existing facility 
will begin early next month and will 
be completed during the 2013 sea- 
son before Northwestern hosts the 
Southland Conference Tournament 
in early May. 

The renovations will provide 436 
seats, including 1 60 prime chairback 
locations behind home plate. The 
new facility will include a roof par- 
uoilj -\. liflg the grandstand area, 
which v\. l cascade away from the 
backstop providing much-enhanced 
permanent seat locations that were 
not available with the old grandstand 
that was located nearly 20 feet away 
from the backstop. 



The construction will also provide 
an enlarged press box for media and 
game management, able to accom- 
modate radio and television crews 
with a capacity more than triple the 
old press box seating. 

The initiative represents the most 
significant project in the five-decade 
history of the NSU softball program. 

It is in addition to $350,000 
in other improv ements to the facility 
in the past four years, with installa- 
tion of new Outfield Club seating, a 
refurbished club house and locker 
room, a new ticket booth, new fenc- 
ing and entrance, a new outfield 
fence, backstop and netting. 

"This project will, first and fore- 
most, significantly and positively 
impact the future of the Lady Demon 
softball program. 

Combined with other enhance- 
ments made in recent years, the con- 
struction of a new grandstand will 
give NSU a facility which will pro- 
vide a great Division I softball set- 
ting for the players and coaches of 
today and tomorrow," said Burke. 

"On a broader scope, the ability 
to complete this project with funds 
outside of the university and Athletic 
Department budget reflects a resolve 
to continue moving the athletic pro- 
gram in a positive direction and cer- 
tainly sets the stage for completion 
of other facility projects that are on 
the drawing board." 

About 50 percent of the pri- 
vate funding is already in place 
with chairback seating available at 
$1,000, including permanent nam- 
ing rights for the seats. Other nam- 
ing opportunities at the facility are 
also available through multi-year 
commitments, said Burke. 



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The NSU Softball Complex is set to receive a makeover starting Oct. 27. The renovations will be done before the SLC Tournament. 



"The initial level of support for 
this project has been outstanding 
and to those supporters, we extend a 
heartfelt thanks," said Burke. 

"In moving forward, I am con- 
fident that more former players and 
other individuals, especially those 
who have a personal affinity for 
women's sports and their success, 



will help complete the fund raising 
portion of this project in the very 
near future." 

TB A Studio of Monroe is the ar- 
chitectural firm designing the proj- 
ect, led by Tim Brandon and Lisa 
Peddy. The contractor is RDS Con- 
struction of Natchitoches. 

"This is a quantum leap forward 



for our program," said fourth-year 
NSU softball coach Donald Pickett. 
"This project will transform an al- 
ready good facility into a great one. 

It will be a super place to watch 
softball and to play and practice. It's 
going to be a huge boost for us in 
recruiting." 

The Lady Demons will wrap up 



fall workouts this month, clearing 
the way for construction to begin. 

The regular season begins in early 
February with the first home appear- 
ance later that month. 



For complete story 
visit nsudemons.com 





nt 



Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, October 31, 2012 * Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 8 




America Recycles Day Nov. 15 



Graphic courtesy of News Bureau 
Project raises students' awareness of recycling for campus and community. 



Courtesy of News Bureau 

Northwestern State Univer- 
sity will commemorate 
America Recycles Day w ith 
a recycling awareness event from 9 
a.m. -noon Thursday, Nov. 1 5 on the 
pedestrian brickway in front of Ky- 
ser Hall. The university's Student 
Government Association is spon- 
soring the program that encourages 
participants to sign cards to pledge 



to recycle more, according to Raven 
Maxile of Gueydan, SGA vice presi- 
dent. 

The student-led program is one 
of several coordinated through a 
partnership between the University 
of Louisiana System and Keep Loui- 
siana Beautiful, the state's non-profit 
volunteer organization dedicated to 
litter prevention and waste reduc- 
tion. The UL System and its nine 
universities joined forces with KLB 
as part of the Health Communities 



Grants program. KLB has awarded 
the UL System $30,000 to imple- 
ment a series of projects around 
Louisiana. 

Each school involved s going to 
do a service-learning project based 
on America Recycles Day," Maxile 
said. "Our campus event outside Ky- 
ser is intended to educate students 
about recycling. We encourage stu- 
dents and faculty to take the recy- 
cling pledge." 

The SGA is encouraging every- 



one to wear green on America Re- 
cycles Day. The SGA will provide 
recycle bins onsite for those who 
would like to drop off recyclable 
materials like newspapers, bottles, 
etc. 



For the rest of this story, 

check out 
www. news.nsula.edu 



Students prepare for GRE testing 



Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

/\ s seniors prepare for either 
*~fall graduation or their 
final spring semester, many 
are also preparing to sit for the 
Graduate Record Exam (GRE). A 
requirement for admittance in most 
graduate level programs, the GRE 
is a standardized test that assesses 
a student's readiness for graduate 
studies. 

The GRE is made up of three 
parts: verbal and quantitative 
reasoning and analytical writing. 
The verbal reasoning section tests 
one's ability to summarize ideas, 
understand the meanings of words 
using contextual evidence, analyze 
the relationship(s) between words 
and understand the logic of the 
given texts. 

There will be two verbal 
reasoning sections, each with 
20 questions. There are three 
types of questions on this part 
of the test: text completion, 
sentence equivalence and reading 
comprehension. Problem- 
solving abilities are tested in the 
quantitative reasoning section of 
the exam. Like verbal reasoning, 
there are two sections with 20 
questions for the quantitative 



reasoning portion as well. Algebra 
and geometry will be tested, but 
calculus and trigonometry will not 
be tested. The skills measured in 
this section are logical thinking and 
information application. 

Critical thinking and writing 
skills will be tested on the analytical 
writing section. Students will write 
two essays in this portion of the 
exam. One of the essays will require 
students to choose one of two topics 
and form a believable argument. 
The other essay will require that 
students evaluate a given argument. 

Angela Mclntyre, a senior 
psychology and addiction studies 
major, will soon take the GRE. She 
has decided to sit for the exam so 
that she may continue her education 
and obtain a master's degree in 
psychology. 

"I would have to say that 
quantitative reasoning would be 
the most difficult subject for me," 
Mclntyre said. "I don't care for 
math as much. That's the area I tend 
to struggle with and avoid." 

Because of this, Mclntyre has 
decided to hire a private tutor to 
help her prepare for the upcoming 
exam. 

Senior English major Patrick 
Key has already taken the GRE. To 
prepare for the exam he purchased 




Senior Bethany LaVergne, a liberal arts with a concentration in scientific theory major, takes a 
moment for GRE preparation. It is recommended that students begin preparing for the GRE at 
least four to 12 weeks before taking the exam. 



a book from Amazon and studied 
throughout the summer. For him the 
most difficult part of the exam was 
the quantitative reasoning because 
he struggles with math. The verbal 
reasoning and analytical reasoning 
sections, however, were a breeze. 
He advises students to practice 



their writing skills and expect 
random questions on the analytical 
writing exam." How random? Think 
superheroes and media. 

Sarah McFarland, department 
head of language & communication 
and associate professor of English, 
emphasizes the importance of 



taking the GRE. . 

"The GRE is important in 
evaluating graduate admission 
applications because it is one 
of the few indicators designed 
to estimate student ability and 
future success in a particular 
subject or graduate program and is 



statistically normed," McFarland 
said. "Correspondingly, it 
puts individual students into a 
percentile ranking based on the 
scores of all recent examinees, 
which is useful because although 
all 4.0 GPAs are not the same, all 
1000 GRE scores are the same. 
However, it is also important 
for students facing their GRE 
exams to know that admissions 
committees recognize the flaws 
in this kind of measurement, 
too. GRE scores are only 
one component of graduate 
applications and are typically 
considered of equal or lesser 
importance than your scholastic 
record as a whole and the quality 
of your personal statement, letters 
of recommendation, and other 
application materials." 

Interested students must register 
for the GRE online at www.ets. 
org/gre, by phone (l -800-529- 
3590) or by mail. After completing 
registration, students will receive 
a voucher. This voucher and an 
acceptable form of I.D. (i.e., 
state issued I.D. or driver's 
license) must be given to the test 
administrator on the day of the 
exam. 

For more information on GRE 
testing, visit http://www.ets.org/ 
ere. 



Students and faculty continue to be an advocate for cancer awareness 



Ty Johnson 

News Editor 

Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 

Yonna Pasch has spent the 
last year battling cancer. The 
director of student activities 
wants to use her experience to 
help students. Pasch has been a 
motivational speaker, helped to 
raise funds to fight cancer and 
regularly blogs about cancer 
awareness. 

This month several campus 
organizations have sponsored 
events for Breast Cancer 
Awareness Month. One of these 
events was the Student Activities 
Board's "What's Your Normal?" 
Pasch described her experiences 
and the signs of cancer young 
women may detect. 
"You are your best advocate," 




Orange Leaf. NSU's chapter of 
Up Til' Dawn also works to aid 
cancer victims and to spread cancer 
awareness. Michael Stephenson is 
the campus executive director. 

"I've never had anyone close 
to me have cancer," Stephenson 
said. "So when Yonna had me at 
the panel for 'Know Your Normal,' 
she is the closest person to me to 
be diagnosed. Her being diagnosed 
has opened my eyes." 

Stephenson said he is 
passionate about children's cancer 
because 1 0,000 children are 
diagnosed each year. 
"I wanted to be a part of something 
bigger than myself," Stephenson 
said. 



Photo Courtesy of News Bureau 
Yonna Pasch shared her personal story on the Student Activities Board's "What's Your Normal?" 

Pasch said. "You need to know participated in the Susan G. Komen Other events on campus this fall 

yourself and if something is not Race for the Cure in Alexandria to raise money included "Chunk 
normal, go and ask for help." earlier this month. The local event Your Change" at a local traffic 

Pasch and some friends also raised S80,000. light and a community night at 



For the rest of this story, 

check out 
www. nsucurrentsauce .com 



Student 
Messenger 
Update 



Fall Wind Ensemble 

Magale Recital Hall 
Oct. 31, 7:30 p.m. 

Voter Awareness 
Informational 

(In front of Vic's) 

Nov. 1,11 a.m.- 2. p.m. 

*St. Jude's Give 
Thanks Walk 

540 Boardwalk Blvd. 
Bossier City 
Nov. 17 

'Check your student 
email to register for 
this event 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday Thursday 

80748° 84754° 



Friday 

86/56° 



Saturday 

83758° 



Sunday 

79754° 



Monday 

71749° 



Tuesday 

78747° 






Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
October 31, 2012 



NSU presents 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' 



Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 

Imagine yourself looking for 
love in colonial India with 
mystical creatures. This will 
he the setting next week for NSU's 
production of Shakespeare's 
comical play "A Midsummer 
Night's Dream." 

A cast of 24 will create the 
story of two couples trying to fall 
in love. The play begins with two 
men falling in love with the same 
woman who only likes one of the 
men while her friend likes (the 
man her friend doesn't like). One 
couple runs off into the woods, 
;ind the other couple runs after 
(hem. 

The King of Fairies pours a 
notion onto their eyes to make 
(hem fall in love with the right 
person. They each end up falling 
in love with the wrong person. 
Then, both men fall in love with 
(he other woman. Eventually, 
(hey all fall in love with the right 
person. 

The cast has seven leads: 
•Titania (Queen of the Fairies) 
played by Nina Breeland 
•Oberon (King of the Fairies) 
played by Kwame Lily 
•Puck (King's henchman) 



played by Will Sawyer 
•Couples: 

Demetrius played by Zach 
Judge 

Helena played by Sarah Roberts 
Lysander played by Tim 
Sandifer 

Hermia played by Victoria 
Olivier 

"It's been kind of fun to create 
these characters," Andrew Lewis, 
director, said. "It's been set in 
Colonial India so it's not set in 
your standard Shakespeare play." 

Lewis is in his second year as 
the director of musical theatre, and 
he added his own twist to the play 
by casting women in traditional 
men's roles. 

Lewis started working on "A 
Midsummer Night's Dream" last 
spring. 

At least 90 students auditioned 
and over the summer, Lewis kept 
in contact with his design team. 
Rehearsals began Sept. 8. 

"The play is very active with 
the characters running in the 
forest." Lewis said. "It's a lot of 
fun running around. By the end 
the cast will be very tired." 

Lewis chose the play because 
everyone relates to love. 

"The play is about love, he 
said. "Who doesn't like love?" 




Some of the cast of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" rehearsing for opening night, to be held on 
p.m. in A.A. Fredericks Auditorium. 



Submitted Photo 
Nov. 7 at 7:30 



Showtimes 

Presented at 
A.A. Fredericks Auditorium 



Nov. 7-10: 

7:30 p.m. 

Nov. 11: 

Matinee 2 p.m. 
Free for students 

Adults: $15. 

Children 12 and under: 
$12. 

Seniors 65 and older: 
$12 




Students continue to embrace Halloween 



Camille Mosley 

Freshman Scholar 

It's here! It's here! The 
season of goblins and 
ghouls is here! Bust out 
the fake blood and plastic 
zombie limbs! Halloween 
is probably one of the most 
popular times of the year 
because television networks 
play some of the best horror 
movies and decorations in 
traditional Halloween colors 
can be spotted everywhere. 

Halloween is an ancient 
tradition that is revered in 
several different cultures. 
Irish and Scottish immigrants 
carried versions of the 
tradition to North America in 
the 1 9th century. 

Other western countries 
embraced the holiday in the 
late 20th century including 
Ireland, the United States, 
Canada, Puerto Rico and the 
United Kingdom as well as 



Australia and New Zealand. 

It is thought to have 
originated with the ancient 
Celtic festival of Samhain 
(som-ween), when people 
would light bonfires and 
wear costumes to ward off 
roaming ghosts. In the eighth 
century, Pope Gregory III 
designated Nov.l as a time to 
honor all saints and martyrs; 
the holiday, All Saints' Day, 
incorporated some of the 
traditions of Samhain. 

The evening before was 
known as All Hallows' Eve 
and later Halloween. Over 
time, Halloween evolved into 
a secular, community-based 
event characterized by child- 
friendly activities such as 
trick-or-treating. 

In a number of countries 
around the world, as the days 
grow shorter and the nights 
get colder, people continue 
to usher in the winter season 
with gatherings, costumes and 
candy. 




Photo courtesy of KNWD's Richard Sharp and Taylor Purr 
A Jack-O-Lantern carved by an NSU student submitted to KNWD 91.7 
FM The Demon's "Attack of the Jack-O-Lanterns" contest. 



Tradition is what makes 
Halloween so special. Some of 
the traditions included during 
Halloween involve trick-or- 



treating, haunted houses, 
decorations, costumes, parties 
and bonfires. 

Many students here at 



Northwestern have Halloween 
traditions of their own. 

Hanna Merida, freshman 
biology major, has one 
such tradition involving the 
Hispanic All Hallow's Eve. 

"As a child, my dad would 
take my brother and I to the 
cemetery to visit and bless old 
graves of our past relatives," 
Merida said. "Afterwards, to 
keep my mom's traditions, we 
would go trick-or-treating!" 

Another tradition comes 
from Hannah Galloway, a 
freshman biology major. 

"My family carved 
pumpkins the day before 
Halloween, and the day of 
Halloween, my mom would 
make chili," Galloway said. 
"The kids would go trick-or- 
treating while the adults had 
a party under the carport and 
handed out candy." 

Halloween is also a time 
to dress up and become 
whomever or whatever one's 
imagination can think of. It 



is a time when communities 
come together to spend lots of 
money on candy, decorations 
and costumes in order to be 
the most frightening on the 
block. 

Speaking of frightening, 
Spencer Dohmann, freshman 
CIS major, used to help his 
family put on a haunted house 
every year. 

"My mother's favorite 
holiday was Halloween," 
Dohmann said. "Every 
October, we went all out with 
decorations, turned the garage 
into a mini haunted house and 
dressed the part." 

"We bought fog machines, 
and we had guillotines- the 
whole nine yards," Dohmann 
added. "We would coordinate 
our outfits with the decor. 
For example, one year we 
had a lot of skeletons, so 
my brother and I dressed as 
skeletons and jumped out at 
people who thought we were 
decorations." 



Celebrating the Halloween lifestyle 




Jacob Labutka 



Everyday 
many of 
us assume 
our daily roles as 
students and must 
dress the part. 
College fash- 
ion is certain- Style Columnist 
ly diverse, but 

almost everyone has a consistent 
style they subconsciously adhere 
to. 

However, when the spirits of 
those beyond the grave come back 
lor the night our wild sides can 
come out in all shapes and styles. 

We certainly don't have to pre- 
tend to be witches who arose af- 
ter the lighting of the black flame 
candle. But if you choose to dress 
as Sarah Jessica Parker in "Hocus 
Pocus" and have a mortal bus boy 
by your side then I commend you. 

Impersonations bring the dead 
alive in costumes that are as tame 
as a nun to as sinister as a weeping 
angel from "Doctor Who" (they are 
ridiculously creepy by the way). 

As adults we now wear costumes 
solely for our own self-gratification 
without being able to receive candy 
from neighborhood strangers. We 
must face a harsh reality: if we want 
candy this Halloween we must to 
go to Wal-Mart and buy bags full of 



it ourselves. 

I assume most of you either 
have your costumes or are choos- 
ing to only celebrate Halloween by 
partying. However, some people 
(like myself) have absolutely no 
clue what character or political fig- 
ure we will attempt to impersonate 
this year. 

Sometimes when we have no 
costume ideas, we have to get 
cheap and desperate. The cheap- 
est and quickest costume is to be a 
zombie. Tear up a shirt, slap some 
red paint on and look absolutely 
filthy like you're ready to eat an 
unsuspecting civilian or imperson- 
ate KeSha. 

If this still proves to be too much 
effort, then you can just be a ghost. 
Everyone has sheets on their bed 
and if for some reason you don't 
then you can be a ghost that's cov- 
ered with a snugly blanket. 

Better yet, you could also be 
your favorite "Jersey Shore" char- 
acter by applying a lot of bronzer 
and wearing some form of animal 
print. 

If you really have no ideas, then 
make up for your lack of costume 
by getting in the Halloween spirit 
by carving a pumpkin. You can buy 
a pumpkin for a few dollars and 
find carving ideas online or in a 




From left, Rebecca Lefante, Victoria 
celebrate Halloween by dressing up 

carving kit. 

The moral of the story is that you 
should use this time to gather with 
friends and act just as silly as you 
always do, except with costumes 



Submitted Photo 
Kwentua, and Linda Ashlskog, 
as a panda, a penguin and a cat. 

on. Like every holiday, Hallow- 
een only comes once a year so you 
should celebrate it by consuming 
as much candy and having as many 
good times as possible. 





Submitted Photo 

Halloween style variation to traditional pigs in a blanket. The mummy can be 
made with a few ingredients and little preparation. 

Mummy Dogs 

A spooky twist on pigs in a blanket 



Recipe Courtesy of 
Makelifedelicious. com 

Ingredients: 

1 can (8 oz) crescent rolls or 1 can' 
(8 oz) Crescent Recipe Creations 
refrigerated flaky dough sheet 

2 1/2 slices American cheese, 
quartered if 

I0 large hot dogs 

Cooking spray - 

Mustard or ketchup, it desired 

Directions: 

1. Heatovento 375°F. 

2. If using crescent rolls: Unroll 
dough; separate at perforations, 
creating 4 rectangles. Press per- 
forations to seal. If using dough 
sheet: Unroll dough; cut into"4 
rectangles. 

3. With knife or kitchen scissors 
(I used a pizza cutter), cut each 
rectangle lengthwise into 1 piec- 
es, making a total of 40 pieces of 
dough. 



4 Slice cheese slices into quarters 

(1/2 slice cheese, cut in half). 

5. Wrap 4 pieces of dough around 
each hot dog and 1/C slice of 
cheese to look like "bandages," 
stretching doueh slightly to com- 
pletely cover RoCdog. About 1/2 
inch from one end ofeach hot dog, 
separate "bandages'" so hot dog 
shows through for "face." 

6 On ungreased large cookie 
sheet, place wrapped "hot dogs 
(cheese side down): spray dough 
lightly with cooking spray. 

7. Bake 13 to 17 minutes or until 
dough is light golden brown and 
hot uogs are hot 

8. With mustard (or ketchup), 
draw features on "face." (Put con- 
diment into a zip-close bag, cut the 
Comer tip off and draw the faces 
that way) 

9. Enjoy! 





pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
October 31, 2012 



Prejudiced parents prevent progeny's preferred pick 



When you"re picking out a 
costume for Halloween, 
it's hard enough to find 
something you want 
without constricting 
yourself to something your 
gender should wear. 

When I was roaming 
the aisles of Goodwill, I 
didn't spurn any corded 
sweaters that might 
work for a costume of 
BBC's John Watson. 
I even looked out for 
any blue and orange striped shirts 
that I could use to pull off a cheap 
costume for "Teen Wolfs" Derek 
Hale. 

I couldn't find anything that 
worked, as this is Natchitoches, but 



I w ould have gotten pretty upset if 

someone had told me that I couldn't 

wear those costumes because they 

were for boys. I didn't 

even think that was a big 

deal today, but according 

to an episode of "What 

Would You Do?," it is a 

problem many children in 

the U.S. are faced with. 

The skit involved 
Catherine Beverly ^ actors a c - hild ^ 

Opinions Editor a mother, shopping for 
Halloween costumes 
at a department store. None of the 
other customers are actors. The boy 
actor was telling his mother (also an 
actor) that he wanted to be a Disney 
princess. The mother was hesitant 
and tried to talk him out of it, 




something I can almost understand. 
Children, and even adults, are pretty 
cruel and probably wouldn't turn 
down a chance to mock a boy for 
being dressed as a princess. 

Several customers approached 
the mother, almost ignoring the 
child, and told her that it was just a 
phase and that she just had to give 
him a definite "No!" The boy put 
the costume over his clothes and 
when he returned the customer with 
the mother recoiled at the sight of 
him. If this had been a real incident, 
that woman would have been 
cementing in that child's head that 
he can't be what he wants. 

The next scene had a little 
girl as the child and she wanted 
to be Spiderman. I saw that and 



immediately thought the situation 
would change. It wasn't as 
stigmatized for girls to dress as 
boys, right? Apparently I was wrong 
again. A woman approached the 
adult actress and told her that she 
needed to "nip it in the bud." "It" 
being the little girl's desire to be 
Spiderman and, indirectly, unique 
behavior. 

I heard that and I have to admit 
that I had a little aneurism. This 
stranger was telling a mother, in 
front of her child, to nip her desire 
to be a strong leader in the bud. A 
minute later a bystander steps in to 
support the child's decision to be 
wear the Spiderman costume. 

After the show, she tells the 
camera that she interfered because 



of the previous woman's comment. 
She was afraid the stranger was 
hurting the child's feelings and 
admitted that it might have sounded 
a bit like the woman was trying to 
tell the mother how r to not let her 
kid become gay. 

The fact that there are people 
that think Halloween costumes are 
how people realize they are gay 
disgusts me a little. Little boys 
shouldn't be forced to emulate 
soldiers and ninjas, two costumes 
a customer suggests for the first 
child actor. When a woman asked 
the boy if he wanted to be a soldier, 
he responded with a simple, "War 
is bad." 

For little girls it shouldn't be a 
choice between Tinker Bell and a 



cat. Wanting to be Spiderman isn't 
an indicator of your sexuality, it's * 
an indicator of your personality. 
The woman that supported the girl's 
decision to be Spiderman simply 
told the mother that her daughter 
had a strong desire to be a hero, to 
save people. That was what those 
people were trying to "nip in the 
bud." 

So, when your children ask 
you if they can be something for 
Halloween that seems a bit non- 
traditional, think about it first. 
If you truly fear for your child's 
safety, something that we still have 
to worry about in this day and age, 
than you could try to compromise. 
Otherwise, let your child express his 
or herself - it won't hurt anyone. 



Proclaiming miracles: Part one 



Keep in mind that when I say "offensive" I don't 
use the word lightly. If you are offended by the 
less-than-wholesome content on HBO, I don't 
care, HBO really doesn't care and nobody else 
should, either. 

If you are offended by the burning of 
American flags or depictions of the Prophet 
Mohammed, feel free to rant about it but don't 
expect me to empathize. Symbols are what we 
make them, and a smoking piece of cloth or a 
vanilla set of Norwegian cartoons is powerless 
to affect your life in any way whatsoever - 
unless you let it. 

Most of the time when people claim 
offense they are playing the victim in a 
victimless crime, and I can see why. It grants them a 
certain kind of power. They are suddenly allowed to 
cry foul and bristle with oh-so-righteous indignation 
because some poorly-trained politician took his 
umpteenth verbal misstep. They feel important, and 
with that desire, at least, I can empathize. 

But there is an ocean of difference between 
Governor Mitt Romney's proverbial binders of 
women arid Todd Akin's discussion of "legitimate 
rape," in which he propagates the myth that rape 
victims automatically shut down their reproductive 
systems ("by way of womanly magic" seems to be the 
predominant medical theory). 

In the former case, the Romney merely substituted 
the phrase "binders of women" for "binders of women's 
qualifications." While it wasn't the best phrasing, to 
claim that it was driven by some kind of underlying 
sexist compulsion is pure pedantry. Perhaps it was, 
and perhaps the President Obama really is a Muslim, 
but probably not. In this case, the benefit of the doubt 
is owed, and if we withhold it, we rob our legitimate 
complaints of their merit. 

The latter scenario, however, involves a United 
States senator not only demonstrating a contemptible 
capacity for immediately believing and subsequently 
repeating insane myths - provided that they aid his 
agenda, of course - but then suggesting that the myth 
in question be considered when drawing up abortion 
legislation. This second scenario is offensive to me in 
a meaningful way. It is radical and dangerous. When I 
say, "miracle testimony is offensive to me," this is the 
kind of offense to which I refer. 

It may seem a stretch to connect the psychotic 
ramblings of a scarify out-of-touch senator with 
the good-natured claim that God is responsible for 
triumph over cancer, and there is a slight but important 
difference: I feel no hostility towards most miracle 
criers. In large part, they are ordinary people who quite 
badly want to see God's handiwork in their strokes of 
fortune. 

With this, too, I may at least sympathize. I imagine 
that if I believed in God, I would feel somewhat safer 
thinking that an ill family member was in benevolent 
hands, and, should my loved one pull through, I might 
then extend thanks to that benevolence. If I didn't take 
a moment to think, I might even cry "miracle." But it 
would be wrong to do so. 

I don't feel hostility towards these claimants, but 
I feel substantial hostility towards their claims. Let 
us imagine a hypothetical illness with a survival rate 
of around five percent, or one out of 20. Let us now 
imagine exactly twenty patients, all of whom have 
contracted this fictional illness. If the percentages hold, 




Justin Woodard 

Guest columnist 



then nineteen of them succumb to the illness. 

Upon discovering that he is healthy, the surviving 
patient - the five percent - returns home, astonished and 
overjoyed, and tells his family and his friends 
and his coworkers that he never stopped 
praying. God pulled him from the fire. It's a 
miracle. And so what if he wants to celebrate 
his God, to thank Him for intervening? 

Even I have wondered on occasion - and 
I'm sure we've all witnessed or heard of 
similar situations - if there's really anything 
too wrong with this picture. 

And then I remember the 1 9 dead people. 
The sin is in the suggestion: 19 people 
slipped away, unnoticed or uncared for by 
the same hands that saved our hypothetical patient from 
death. 

If one man's unlikely survival is a miracle, then 
what do we call 19 deaths? God's wrath? Unless we 
formulate some theory as to why the five percent 
deserves God's attention while the 95 percent does not, 
then we paint a picture of a God who seems at best 
callous, and at worst heinously immoral. 

Well, perhaps our survivor was more deserving than 
the rest, one might object. Perhaps he prayed harder, or 
slipped a few more dollars into the coffers, or copy and 
pasted a few more guilt-inducing Facebook statuses. 
Are these God's criteria for living? I contend that the 
notion of some holy criteria by which one lives or dies 
contains a kind of sly wickedness. 

It is of course glaringly apparent (read: not so sly) 
when it accompanies the opposite of miracle testimony, 
as was seen last year on Dec. 15, the day that prominent 
antitheist and contrarian Christopher Hitchens died after 
a long bout with esophageal cancer. 

To recall one of the more disturbing (and puerile) 
titles on YouTube: "Christopher Hitchens isn't an 
Atheist. . .Anymore!" The video goes on to detail 
how and why God bestowed cancer upon the famed 
journalist. (I know a man with lung-cancer - a devout 
Christian. The video did not say whether or not this was 
a gift from God.) 

As I said, in this behavior there is an obvious 
wickedness. But it is as present in miracle testimony, 
merely from the other, slyer side of the gap. Whether 
we like it or not, when we claim that a supernatural 
force intervened on our behalf, we divide ourselves 
from the less fortunate. 

We claim moral superiority or a more valuable 
principled existence. We sweep the narratives of the 
dead or dying into a terribly sad category - those 
children that God forgot. 

Even more concerning is the purpose to which 
a great number (though certainly not all) of these 
testimonies are put called proselytization. These 
testimonies range from the grave (and false) business 
of paraplegics suddenly finding their legs to a much 
cheaper, circus-trick kind of persuasion. 

It is an old and oft-employed kind of salesmanship. 
"Look what X (their name) did for me! You, too, can 
have your lost pets returned to you, with just a little 
help from the hereafter." 



The continuation of this story will be 
published in the November 7th issue of 
The Current Sauce. 









Jimmie Walker 


^^^^^^3 u c e 


Chris Degeyter 


Editor-in-Chief 


Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 




Jessica Blow 


Adviser 


Kirstie White 


Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 


Copy Editor 


JC Bryant 


News Editor 


Jacob Labutka 


Social Media 


Alexis Reliford 


Lifestyle Columnist 


Camille Mosley 


Life Editor 


Andrea Nederostova 


Freshman Scholar 


Jimmie Walker 


Sauce Reporter 


Taylor Furr 


Sports Editor 


Contessa Wills 


Delivery Personnel 


Catherine Beverly 


Sauce Reporter 




Office phone 


Opinions Editor 


Damian Glover 
Sauce Reporter 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 


318-357-5456 



Survive the apocalypse: Know your zombies 




I happen to have a highly 
irrational fear of zombies. For 
me, zombies personify death 
in a most horrid way. For 
goodness sake, they get 
half eaten or morbidly 
bitten, then come back 
to eat you. But one must 
know which zombie he or 
she is up against in order 
to survive the dreaded 

Zombie Apocalypse. Camille Mosley 

If a zombie is in 
"Resident Evil 1 and 2" 
(and possibly number three) then 
one may have a likely chance of 
surviving. These zombies are slow 
and the T-virus hasn't evolved 
yet to become those face-splitting 
things. Also, one may be in luck if 
the zombies are "Shaun of the Dead 
zombies," which are also slow. 

The next and scarier types 
of zombies are the "rage virus" 
zombies. These are zombies that 
don't exactly eat people, but rather 
maul and mutilate them. They are 
controlled by an unbelievable rage 
that causes the zombies to lose sight 



of everything but the basic instincts. 

Now, if the zombies are like the 
ones in "Resident Evil: Afterlife 
"and "Resident Evil: 
Retribution," then that 
would be a definite cauSe' 
for concern. The T-virus 
has mutated and now the 
zombies can open up their 
faces and dig through walls 
and floors. That means 
they can get through 



Freshman Scholar one's defenses if he or 
she has a seemingly 
impenetrable wall. 

There is another not-as-well- 
known type of zombie that could 
be potentially extremely dangerous. 
This zombie is known as the 
"conscious zombie." These zombies 
live outside the human race and 
have started to develop a form of 
consciousness. That means that they 
are smart and can use weapons. 

Also, there are various other 
types of zombies out there. There 
are the inverted dogs, the hunters, 
and the executioners. The inverted 
dogs are those creepy Dobermans 



Solution to "The Letter Box" 
from the October 24th issue of 
The Current Sauce 



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W 


B 


C 


H 





A 


W 





H 


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that have been turned inside out 
somehow. 

The hunters are those creatures 
that have been almost morphed 
completely into giant, inverted 
animals. They have extremely large 
claws, with long tongues, the brain 
is often shown and hunters run on 
all four limbs. 

Last are the executioners. 
Executioners are often large, 
mutated beings that carry around 
obscenely large scythes or axes 
and have pyramid-like objects on 
their heads. I'm not quite sure how 
they came to be, but I'm sure it has 
to do with a virus mutation and 
large amount of laboratory tests 
conducted on them. 

There are ways to avoid 
becoming a zombie, a few ways 
being on those $4 posters at Wal- 
Mart. Another good guide to 
surviving the zombie apocalypse 
is to watch "Zombieland" because 
there are some good points, not 
to mention watching every other 
zombie movie out there. 



We need writers! 

Our newspaper 
needs stories 
written by students. 
Come by our office, 
227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join. 

Meetings every 
Monday at 
6:50 p.m. We hope 
to hear from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
October 31, 2012 



Demons edge out Colonels, 27-26 



Christopher Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

The Demons (4-4, 2-2 in con- 
ference) triumphed in their 
annual Homecoming game 
over the Nicholls State Colonels 
(1-6, 0-4), 27-26. The victory keeps 
the Demons alive in the hunt for the 
Southland Conference Champion- 
ship. It also puts them one game 
away from going undefeated at 
home this season. 

The Demons opened strong, lead- 
ing the Colonels 21-9 early in the 
second quarter. The Colonels were 
able to rally back and score 17 un- 
answered points to lead 21-26 going 
into the fourth quarter. The Demons 
took control of the game again in the 
fourth quarter with a strong defen- 
sive effort. A pair of field goals from 
senior kicker John Shaughnessy fin- 
ished the game with the 27-26 win. 

"It's not too hard to go out there 
and kick when you've got a field 
goal unit like I do with wonder- 
ful protection up front, and the best 
holder and snapper I could ask for," 
Shaughnessy said. "All I have to do 
is focus on my job. It was easy." 

The difference of one point in 
the final score cannot be understated. 
After the first touchdown by the Col- 
onels, senior safety Jamaal White 
blocked the extra point kick. That 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Freshman running back Daniel Taylor jogs into the end zone on a 55-yard run. NSU Demons beat the Nicholls Colonels, 26-27. 



blocked kick was the difference be- 
tween victory and overtime. White 
also picked up his 10 th interception 
of the year while he aided the De- 
mons in their defensive push. 

That defensive push is defined by 



the Demons totaling four sacks and 
only allowing the Colonels 49 yards 
in the entire second half. 

However, the win came without 
senior wide receiver Philip Harvey. 
Harvey was at the core of the Demon 



offense before an injury in the 22-27 
loss to the Southeastern Lions ended 
his season. 

Some of the slack from Harvey's 
loss was picked up by freshman tail- 
back Daniel Taylor. Taylor scored 



his fifth touchdown in just 32 touch- 
es in his college career. 

Taylor said the offense saw the 
defense trying to bring pressure on 
the edges, and so called a run up the 
middle. He saw an opening in the 



middle and ran through it to score 
his touchdown. 

"When you're 4-0 at home and 
you win, it doesn't matter what the 
score was," Taylor said. "A win is a 
win. It will go in the record books 
forever. I was very proud of our foot- 
ball team tonight. That was a team 
win in all three phases." 

Fourth year Demon head coach 
Bradley Peveto credits the success to 
the team's composure. 

"Our team never panicked," Pe- 
veto said. "They stuck together. We 
had a lot of emotion on our sideline. 
It was a very passionately played 
game." 

The Demons move on looking 
to keep their Southland Conference 
Championship hopes alive as they 
travel to Arkansas to play the Central 
Arkansas Bears. The Bears currently 
lead the conference at 7-2 overall, 
5-1 in conference. The Demons are 
the last conference opponent of the 
Bears. 

The Bears will secure they at least 
tie for Southland Conference Cham- 
pions with a victory over the De- 
mons. The Demons need to win to 
keep their own hopes for a Champi- 
onship tie alive. 

The Demons meet the Central 
Arkansas Bears at Estes Stadium in 
Conway, Ark. at 7:00 p.m. on Satur- 
day. 



' 1 , - . 






Submitted photo 

Ricardo Acuna came to NSU in 1975. He among 25 former players that returned for Homecoming. 

NSU tennis legend came back 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Sauce Reporter 

NSU had a reunion of 25 
alumni tennis players last 
Friday night at the Health 
and Human Performance Building. 
Alumni came to the reunion not only 
from all over the U.S., but also from 
all over the world. 

Johnnie Emmons, former NSU 
tennis head coach, was the first ten- 
nis head coach to bring international 
tennis players to represent NSU. 
Among them was a Wimbledon 
quarterfinal ist of 1985 — Ricardo 
Acuna who came to NSU from Chile 
in 1975. 

"When I came to NSU, it was 
five of us from Chile," Acuna said. 
"Two of my teammates went back 
home because they were homesick, 
but I enjoyed it here. At the begin- 
ning when I came to NSU, I didn't 
speak English, and I probably knew 



only two words. Emmons would get 
mad at us because we would speak 
only Spanish, and we were making a 
lot of pranks on everybody." 

Acuna's professional tennis ca- 
reer lasted 11 years, from 1978 to 
1989. He considers the Wimbledon 
Quarterfinal in 1985 as his biggest 
tennis accomplishment. In this pres- 
tigious Grand Slam, Acuna defeated 
tennis stars Pat Cash and David Pate 
before losing to Jimmy Connors. 

Also, Acuna won three doubles 
titles during his professional tennis 
career. His highest ranking in the 
world was No. 47 in singles, and 
No. 45 in doubles. Acuna was also a 
member of Chile's Davis Cup Team. 

During his junior days, Acuna 
was ranked No. 1 in Chile among 
players among the ages of 14, 16 
and 1 8. When Acuna played colle- 
giate tennis at NSU, he earned AU- 
American honors in 1 979. 
The same year, he won silver medal 



in singles and doubles at Pan Ameri- 
can games. 

"I really enjoyed all four years 
that I was at NSU," Acuna said. I 
have a lot of great memories from 
here. Later in life, when I was trav- 
eling, 1 would always try to come 
back to Natchitoches to see coach 
Emmons and his wife. NSU has 
changed a lot since the time I studied 
here." 

After his retirement as a profes- 
sional tennis player, Acuna worked 
as a tennis director at the Association 
of Tennis Professionals (ATP) Head- 
quarters in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. 

Then, he became a national men's 
tennis coach while working for the 
United States Tennis Association 
(USTA). 

Recently, Acuna opened a tennis 
academy in Boca Raton, Fla. where 
he currently works there as a tennis 
coach. 




ARi 



91J FM 



of KN 




Lady Demons sweep Southeastern 

Courtesy of Sport Info: 



Mackenzie Neely and Stacey 
DiFrancesco led the way 
for the Northwestern State 
volleyball team as the Lady Demons 
defeated Southeastern Louisiana in 
a 3-0 sweep on Saturday afternoon. 

The 25-14, 25-16, 25-15 win in- 
creases the Lady Demons winning 
streak to six matches and moves 
them up to 18-8 overall and 10-4 
in Southland Conference play. The 
Lady Lions fall to 10-15, 5-10. 

The 10 SLC wins are the most in 
NSU volleyball history. 

"It feels good to get this win in 
particular," said NSU co-head coach 
Hugh Hemesman. "Not necessarily 
because it's the 1 0th win but because 
I think the next couple of weeks are 
going to be pretty challenging." 

Neely and DiFrancesco combined 
for 28 kills, hammering down 14 
apiece. DiFrancesco also tacked on 
nine digs while Neely added seven 
digs and two aces. 

Emily Sweet quarterbacked the 
offense, putting up 38 assists. 

"Emily Sweet did a great job dis- 
tributing the ball," said Hemesman. 
"We wanted to get Mackenzie going 
again on the right and I thought she 
set the right side very well." 

Keelie Arneson set the pace de- 
fensively, digging up 20 attacks. 
"Keelie silently gets her digs," 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
NSU celebrates after scoring a point. The team swept SLU. 



said Hemesman. "She is just so 
sound fundamentally and so fast 
that there are some balls that I don't 
think some people could get to and 
she does." 

Southeastern came out looking 
good in the first set. taking an early 
3-1 lead. The Lady Demons retaliat- 
ed after an SLU attack error sparked 
a 14-0 run to put the score at 16-4. 

The Lady Lions were unable to 
come back as NSU won the set 25- 
14. 

NSU came out hot in the second 
set, gaining a four-point advantage 
as the score read 5-1. SLU fought 
back, tying the set up at 5-5 and 6-6. 

A Lady Lion block error led to 
an 11-0 run for NSU, giving them 
a 20-8 lead. Southeastern could not 



gain momentum as they dropped the 
game 25-16. 

The third set was back and forth in 
the beginning with two ties and two 
lead changes by the 11 -point mark. 
The Lady Demons maintained their 
lead until a bad set by Emily Sweet 
gave SLU a 10-9 advantage. 

NSU answered with seven straight 
points, putting the score at 16-10. 
Southeastern attempted to come 
back, cutting the deficit to four at the 
19-15 mark. 

The Lady Demons ended the game 
on a 6-0 ran, defeating SLU 25-15. 

Northwestern State returns home 
next Friday to match up against Ste- 
phen F. Austin. First serve is set for 
7 p.m. in Prather Coliseum. 




Ty Johnson Alexis Reliford 

Kirstie White 



Katie Beverly jrnmie Walker 

1nl carts Edtor 

Jacob Labutka 



Your Name Here Your Name Here Your Name Here "four Name Here 




Taylor Furr 




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www. nsucuncmsauce. corn 

Office Phone: 318-357-5381 
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Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, November 7, 2012 o Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 9 



Obama Wins Re-Election 





To the left: Students anticipate the 2012 election results at a watch party 
hosted by Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated. 
Above: Refreshments were served and board games were played up 
until the pivotal moments in the election were announced. 



Obama re-elected by nabbing victories in key states 



Ty Johnson 

News Editor 

resident Barack Obama was 
re-elected as the president 

of the United States last night. 

He secured the presidency with 

victories in key states. 
At one point in the race, the 

candidates were neck in neck 

with 1 62 electoral votes. Obama 



picked up support in states that 
were traditionally Democratic 
strongholds such as New York. 
California and other populous 

states. 

Later the president scored a re- 
election victory surpassing the 270 
electoral vote threshold including 
the electoral votes of Ohio and three 
other swing states. 

Students were on the edge of 



their seats for the results. 

Senior psychology major Angel 
Johnson said she's predicted this 
election would be a close one to 
call. 

"The country seemed to be 
divided when it comes to the 
candidates, "Johnson said. "I knew 
this one would be a nail biter." 
Sophomore business major 
Antonio Beaudion said despite 



post-presidential debate polls that 
weren't in Obama's favor, his trust 
in Obama remained. 

"Obama has accomplished 
more than what some people give 
him credit for," Beaudion said. 
"He passed a great health care 
legislation and reformed the student 
loan program. Both of those things 
affect me greatly." 

Beaudion said Obama's 



accomplishments outweigh his 
disappointments. 

"Sure, there are things that could 
be better but overall, I feel like for 
the most part he did what he said he 
would do and he needs another four 
years to do that. That's why he has 
my vote." 

President Obama thanked his 
supporters for his success. 

"I want you to know that this 



wasn't fate, and it wasn't an 
accident," Obama said in an e- mail 
to supporters after the projections 
put him past the 270 threshold. 
"You made this happen. I will spend 
the rest of my presidency honoring 
your support." 



For the rest of this story, check 
out 

www. nsuc urrentsauce.com 





Registration for 
spring begins 

Courtesy of New Bureau 

Early registration for the spring 20 1 3 
semester at Northwestern State Uni- 
versity is under way. Students can 
begin the process by going to nsula. 
edu and click on "Web for Students 
Login." then clicking on NSUCon- 
nect. 

Graduate students, authorized 
ADA students, honor students with 
12 or more hours credit and at least 
a 3.5 cumulative grade point average 
and student-athletes can start the reg- 
istration process. 

Seniors with 90 or more hours can 
register beginning Tuesday, Nov. 6. 
On Wednesday, Nov. 7, juniors can 
start signing up for summer and fall 
classes. Sophomores begin register- 
ing on Thursday, Nov. 8. On Friday, 
Nov. 9, freshmen and students who 
are 25 or over with less than 30 credit 
hours can start registering. 

Returning students who are unsure 
about where to register can contact 
the NSU Registrar's Office at (318) 
357-6171 oratregistrar@nsula.edu. 

For more information about be- 
coming a Northwestern State stu- 
dent, visit the Office of University 
Recruiting website at recruiting.nsu- 
la.edu. 



'Reading is not optional' 

Student poets featured at festival 



Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 



Having Louisiana poet laureate. 
Dr. Julie Kane, as an advisor 
has many advantages. Just ask 
the members of Brainy Acts Poetry 
Society (B.A.P.S.). 

Kane has been able to introduce 
the student performers to many 
people, which has led to many great 
opportunities. 

Last month, B.A.P.S. performed 
spoken word at the Louisiana Book 
Festival in Baton Rouge alongside 
some of the best poets and authors 
in the state of Louisiana. 

The Louisiana Book Festival 
is an annual one-day event that 
draws thousands of attendees that 
participate in several events and 
workshops. Roughly 145 authors, 
poets and performers participated in 
this year's event. 

B.A.P.S. was given a one-hour 
time slot to present their w orks titled 
•Reading Is Not Optional." Thirty- 
minutes were used for performance 
and the remaining thirty minutes 
were used for a question and answer 
session. 

Kane, also a professor of English, 
recalled the student's performance 
and interaction with the audience 
members. 




The Brainy Acts Poetry Society 

"I had never been so proud of 
NSU," Kane said. "They were so 
articulate, positive and had such a 
generosity of spirit." 

Kane was not the only person in 
the audience who was impressed 
with the student performers. A 
librarian in attendance has invited 
them to perform at the LaFourche 
Parish Library in Thibodeaux. 

Additionally, Clemonce Heard, 



Submitted Photo 
was established in 2010. 

co-founder of B.A.P.S., has been 
invited to appear on the NPR 
affiliated radio show, "The Reading 
Life (WNCO)," to discuss the 
organization. 

Heard, who graduated last spring, 
sees poetry as more than just a 
hobby. 

"Poetry is release, not just for me, 
but for those who don't have a voice 



or are too afraid to wear their hearts 
on their tongues," Heard said. 

"To me God is poetry, so writing 
actually brings me closer to him. I 
intend to get my masters in creative 
writing, but for the time being I am 
just writing, studying, performing 
and constantly being amazed by 
what God ghostwrites on each page. 
I'm just being patient and working 
toward whatever door he intends to 
open for B.A.P.S. as well as for me." 

B.A.P.S., a recognized student 
organization that was founded in 
20 10 by Heard and Brandi White, is 
the only organization of its kind at 
NSU. Heard and White founded the 
society as an outlet for students to 
express themselves in an accepting 
environment. 

At least once per semester, 
members write and perform original 
poetry at poetry slams on campus. 
The date of the next poetry slam has 
yet to be determined. However, the 
topic, "Life or Death," has already 
been selected. 

Also, "Reading Is Not Optional." 
may be repeated prior to "Life or 
Death." 

"Anyone who attends a slam can 
expect to laugh, frown, be educated 
and maybe even shed a tear or two." 
Heard said. 

For more information on B.A.P.S. 
log onto facebook.com/brainy.acts. 




Senior Day set 
for Saturday 

Courtesy of New Bureau 

Northwestern State University 
holds its annual Fall Senior Day 
Saturday, Nov. 1 0. 

Check-in begins at 8 a.m. in 
Magale Recital Hall. The program 
starts at 9 a.m. in the A. A. Freder- 
icks Auditorium. 

Events include a student panel 
to answer questions about student 
life and a parent panel to cover 
scholarships, financial aid and 
campus housing. Tours of the NSU 
campus student housing and his- 
toric downtown Natchitoches will 
be available. 

Academic departments at 
Northwestern State will have dis- 
plays and faculty will be available 
to answer questions. A number of 
campus organizations will also be 
on hand to talk about the variety of 
extracurricular activities available 
to add to the campus experience. 

Lunch will be served at noon 
for $9.50. Tickets to the North- 
western State - Sam Houston 
football game at 6 p.m. will also 
be available. 

To make reservations or receive 
more information, call the Office 
of University Recruiting at (800) 
327-1903 or (318) 357-4503 or go 
to recruiting.nsula.edu. 



3 Opinions 

4 Sports 





Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Sunday 


Monday 


Tuesday 


2 Life 


74°/41° 


72/44° 


77/52° 


83758° 


76755° 


58740° 


66/40° 





Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
November 7, 2012 



Students collect Christmas donations 



Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 

For many children, Christ- 
mas is the time for toys, 
clothes and food. For oth- 
ers, just receiving a toothbrush 
brightens their holiday. 

This year Phi Beta Lambda 
wants to brighten the holiday for 
at least 40 children in another 
country. 

The organization, sponsored 
by the School of Business, annu- 
ally hosts its Operation Christmas 
Child Shoebox Packing Party. 

"It's a good opportunity to 
perform service," Lauren Berry, 
PBL's president, said. Berry who 
is a senior accounting major has 
been a member of PBL since her 
freshman year. 

The NSU Operation Christmas 
Child Shoebox Packing Party 
supports the international orga- 
nization Samaritan Purse, which 
has helped aid the world's poor, 
sick and suffering. 

Margret Kilcoyne and Julie 
McDonald are advisors of PBL. 

Kilcoyne has seen firsthand 
how children that are less fortu- 
nate live because she adopted her 
youngest child from Borovichi, 
Russia. 




As she was leaving the coun- 
try, she decided to leave most of 
the clothes and other items she 
bought for her daughter there. 
Her daughter is now 20 years old. 

"This may be the only thing 
this child gets." Kilcoyne said. 
"It helps with compassion." 

Both faculties encourage stu- 
dents to write notes to the chil- 
dren. 

McDonald's grandson wrote 
a note to a child, and the child 
wrote back thanking him for the 
toothbrush he received. Accord- 
ing to McDonald, the father of 
the child also wrote back saying 
that he has to put limits on his 
child brushing his teeth. 

"This is a time to fellowship 
and help others so instead of 
throwing a Christmas Party for 
ourselves, we can help children." 
McDonald said. 



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II II 

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Submitted Photo 

Members of Phi Beta Lambda at last year's Operation Christmas Child 
Shoeox Packing Party. 



Since 2008, PBL members 
have found businesses, fraterni- 
ties, sororities and anyone will- 
ing to donate items for the pack- 
ing party. 

At the party, PBL, along with 
any participating NSU students, 
will pack shoeboxes with as 
many items-such as toys, school 
supplies or hygiene items-the 
shoebox can hold, along with a 
note to the child. 

Students can choose to pack 



for a girl or boy from ages 2-14. 
PBL aims to pack for children 
from ages 5 -9. 

Last year, the organization 
packed 30 shoeboxes. The goal 
this year is to pack 40 shoeboxes. 

For more information on the 
Samaritan's Purse or the Opera- 
tion Christmas Child program, 
visit www.samaritanpurse.org. 



Items to donate 



Acceptable items include: 



Toys* 

School supplies 
Hard candy 
T-shirts 
Socks 
Ball caps 
Sunglasses 
Hair clips 
Flashlights 
Personal notes 



Do not include: 



• Used or damaged 
items 

War-related items 

Chocolate 

Food 

Out-of-date candy 

Liquids 

Lotion 

Medications or vitamins 
Breakable items 
Aerosol cans 



* Pack extra batteries for items that require batteries. 




Fighting against 'ecocide': the eco-friendly lifestyle 



T 



his election 
year has 




provided a 
chance for voters 
to solidify their 
political stanc- 
es and become Jacob Labutka 
more in- Style Columnist 
formed about 
policy issues. 

We are the most passionate about 
issues that directly affect ourselves 
and those we love. 

Social issues such as striving for 
equal pay for women and anti-dis- 
crimination campaigns for LGBTQ 
individuals are very important and 
should not be ignored. However, 
we must not only pay attention to 
a social issue that we care the most 
about, but we must both care for our 
social well being and the natural en- 
vironment we all inhabit. 

We have all seen the commercials 
and campaigns that want us to take 
a part in preserving our ecosystem. 



Most people do not have a problem 
with recycling and take the extra 
time to put bottles and cans in the re- 
cycling bin. Recycling is important 
and necessary, but it is not enough in 
order to embody a truly eco-friendly 
lifestyle. 

I'm not saying that you will soon 
become an ice-cold Jake Gyllenhaal 
who needs to be saved by his father 
Dennis Quaid (even though global 
warming is certainly an issue). How- 
ever, one must take into account that 
environmental issues affect us (and 
will increasingly continue to affect 
us) more than we realize. 

One of the most important of 
these issues is the water supply. 
With a rising global population and 
increasing demand of resources, wa- 
ter is in high demand everywhere. 
Unfortunately, the supply of clean 
water is relatively scare compared to 
the abundance of useless salt water 
(some water comes from desalina- 
tion, but it's currently an expensive 




Photo by Jacob Labutka 

From left, Taylor Orgeron and Laura Johnson recycle their trash out- 
side of Morrison Hall. 



process). 

We are not currently suffering 
from water scarcity here in the U.S., 



but the water scarcity we fear is al- 
ready a harsh reality for many in un- 
developed countries. Everyone must 



do their part to contribute to the con- 
servation of water. 

For example, it is unnecessary to 
take really long showers every day, 
(showers longer than 30 minutes) 
especially those who do so several 
times a day. Also, it is both cheaper 
and more environmentally savvy to 
purchase a water filter. 

I know Natchitoches water is ab- 
solutely detestable, but water that 
runs through my Brita faucet filter 
gets rid of the "Natty-taste." Filtered 
water saves you money in the long- 
run and conserves plastic (which 
contains water that companies often 
extract from countries that need it 
more than we do). 

Like water, electricity is often 
times a scarce resource in many 
undeveloped countries. Light is an 
electrical resource most of us do 
have to worry about. 

However, in many places through- 
out the world this is not the case. 
Many homes in other countries ei- 



ther do not have electricity or do not 
live in an area with a stable power 
grid. In the urban areas of Guinea, 
the only dependable sources of light 
that students can depend on are 
lampposts in airport parking lots. 

Make an effort to conserve elec- 
tricity by turning off lights and ap- 
pliances when they are not in use 
(the burning of fossil fuels is largely 
responsible for our power supply). 

I'm not advocating that we stop 
using our resources; we do need 
lights to study with and see inside 
our homes. 

We also shouldn't use the envi- 
ronmental crisis as an excuse to not 
take showers (I prefer for myself 
and my peers to not smell like dirt 
and sweat). 

Overall, we shouldn't take our 
resources for granted. We should 
maintain awareness of environmen- 
tal issues that affect everyone and do 
our part to conserve what we don't 
need. 



Students await the arrival of a new restaurant 




Alexis Reliford 

Life Editor 

Ever get tired of eating on 
campus, but can't find a 
place to satisfy your taste? 
According to a job ad posted 
in the Natchitoches Times daily 
newspaper, Natchitoches will 
soon be expanding it's number of 
restaurants. 

IHOP, formally known as The 
International House of Pancakes, 
is a United States based restaurant 
chain that specializes in break- 
fast food. While its main focus is 
breakfast, the chain's menus also 
offer a variety of lunch and dinner 
items. 

Some NSU students including 
junior Tinisha Manning are excit- 
ed about the news and are eager to 
eat there. 

'it gives us more variety in 
terms of places to eat," Manning 
said. 

Manning said she would eat 
there frequently because IHOP is 
one of her favorite restaurants. 



IHOp 



s T A U ft A 



Ar 



Photo courtesy of Google 

IHOP is coming soon to Natchitoches. Above is the logo and some of 
the signature food served. 



Also sharing Manning's excite- 
ment about the new addition to 
the town is fellow junior, Kyla 
Harrell. 

"The best thing about IHOP 
are the free pancake days," Har- 
rell said. "I would go just for 
them." 

The city of Natchitoches could 



not comment on the exact location 
of the restaurant at this time. Ac- 
cording to sophomore Nick My- 
ers, he would not mind driving to 
wherever IHOP is located. 

"Nothing is going to keep me 
from my pancakes and bacon," 
Myers said. "I'd go at least a cou- 
ple of times a month." 




5P* 




Ty Johnson 




JimmieWalker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Mods AdvUor 



Alexis Reliford 
Ufa I 



Kirstie White 
Copy EoTtar 



Katie Beverly 
Opinions r 



J immie Walker 
Sports Ecfitor 



Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist 



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Staff Raportar Staff Raportar Staff Raportar Staff Reports*- 



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conn 

www. njucurrcntsaucc- ( 

Office Phone: 318-357-5381 
tbflow us oki Twiner @TheChirrcntSaiice 
Find on us Faccbook 




Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

"Fun Size" 

Rated PG-13 

4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

"Silent Hill: 
Revelation 3D" 

Rated R 
4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

'Paranormal Activity" 

Rated R 
4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

"Sinister 

Rated R 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 






pinions 



Catherine Beverly 

J 

Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
November 7, 2012 



ing miracles: Part two 



This is continuation of the story 
published in the October 3 1st 
issue of 
The Current Sauce. 




Justin Woodard 

Guest columnist 



I find it strikingly odd that more 
religious people don't find 
these particular testimonies 
as offensive as I do. They 
construe God - by relevant 
definition, the omnipotent, 
omniscient creator of 
everything - as some 
sort of amateurish Vegas 
magician. 

One eon he parts the 
Red Sea for Moses, the 
next he makes sure you 
hit that green light when 
you're late for work. 

The whole problem lies in this 
contemporary, extreme fatalism 
that predominates a great deal of 
the Southern Protestant culture. 
1 submit to you that this idea is 
immoral- everything happens for a 
purpose (I use the word "purpose" 
and not "reason" here, simply 
because by necessity of causality, 
everything does, in fact, happen for 
a reason). 

Everything that occurs lends 
itself towards some grand divine 
scheme. This man survived for a 



We need writers! 



plan, and for that same plan a great 
many others died. What is the plan? 
Nobody seems to know. But that 
doesn't stop us from categorizing 
our fortunes and misfortunes by the 
standard of divine purpose. 

The crux of my argument finds 
its root in the problem of suffering. 
The problem being, of course, that 
it exists. For all of God's grand 
designing, he could not 
formulate a design devoid 
of suffering. 

This is enough of a 
problem on its own, but 
when we begin to extend 
the plan's influence to 
things like our personal 
illnesses and recoveries, 
failures and triumphs, we 
may no longer explain 
sutfering with the "free will" 
theodicy - the idea that God allows 
suffering because without it there 
could be no choice. 

If he rescues one man from 
cancer, but allows 19 more to 
die, he ceases to fit the mold of 
that explanation. He ceases to be 
a loving parent, interested and 
hopeful but ultimately allowing us 
to destroy ourselves if we choose 
to. He instead becomes a sadist and 
a tyrant. 

And here I lay my case to 
rest. Miracle testimonies, in their 



implications, breed an unavoidable 
sadism by division - an us-and- 
them mindset. 

According to this kind of 
testimony, the properly religious 
person can hope to be spared 
from illness, and misfortune and 
eventually death. The nonreligious 
person - or worse, the person who 
follows the wrong religion - may 
not. 

And when devout men of 
the correct religion fall ill and 
die - which I think you will find 
happens with equal frequencies 
across all religious and nonreligious 
populations - we are asked to see 
the purpose in it, because we cannot 
imagine a death that is not valuable 
to fate. 

I think that death is probably 
meaningless. In my experience, this 
is generally regarded as a disturbing 
or hopeless or ugly idea. It needn't 
be. 

In whatever way that meaning 
may exist, life is meaningful. By my 
view, meaning is defined by life. 

So when I say that miracle 
testimony is offensive to me in 
a way similar to Todd Akin's 
frightening babble, it is because 
it suggests that one life may be 
inherently more meaningful or more 
purposeful than another. 



Our newspaper needs stories written by students. Come by our 
office, 227 Kyser, if you would like to join. 

Meetings every Monday at 6:50 p.m. We hope to hear from 
you! 

- Current Sauce staff 









Jimmie Walker 


^^jirent 

^^^L< 1 tiff" 


Chris Degeyter 


Editor-in-Chief 


Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 




Jessica Blow 


Adviser 


Kirstie White 


Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 


Copy Editor 


JC Bryant 


News Editor 


Jacob Labutka 


Social Media 




Alexis Reliford 


Lifestyle Columnist 


Camille Mosley 


Life Editor 


Andrea Nederostova 


Freshman Scholar 


Jimmie Walker 


Sauce Reporter 


Taylor Furr 


Sports Editor 


Contessa Wills 


Delivery Personnel 


Catherine Beverly 


Sauce Reporter 


Office phone 


Opinions Editor 


Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 


318-357-5456 





'Beowulf and 'Paradise Lost' 
British literature at its best 



One can ask anyone who 
hangs around me how 
obsessed I am with British 
literature. Not just any 
British literature, though. 
"Beowulf and John 
Milton's "Paradise Lost" 
are some of the best works 
of literature to ever grace 
this earth. One can even 
ask my friends how I 
take every opportunity 
available to screech, "I 
AM. BEOWULF!" 

If one didn't have the fortunate 
opportunity to read "Beowulf," 
it is about a young war hero who 
wants to achieve ultimate fame. 
Beowulf catches wind of a monster 
terrorizing a village with a great 
king. Beowulf goes to the village to 
slay the monster hoping that this is 
his ticket to his goal. 

While in the village, Beowulfs 
fantastic tales are told by the 
men and villagers in the Mead 
Hall where Grendal the monster 
terrorizes. Things happen, and 
Beowulf slays Grendal, Grendal's 




mother and a terrorizing dragon 
before the end of his reign as the 
village king. 

His goal is met as he 
dies an epic death while 
slaying the dragon. He is 
then immortalized through 
his grand adventures. 
There is only one surviv ing 
copy of "Beowulf," and it 
is in the British library in 

Camille Mosley London Wnat , would 
Freshman Scholar g i ve to see that copy. 

"Beowulf is one of the 
most honest and amazing works I 
have ever read. 

The next best piece of British 
literature I have ever read is John 
Milton's "Paradise Lost." Some of 
the best quotes that are so relevant 
are in this book. Just reading the 
quotes put me at a loss for words. 
Some of the most notorious quotes 
are: 

"In the arms not worse, in 
foresight much advanced,/ We may 
with more successful hope resolve/ 
To wage by force or guile eternal 
war,/ Irreconcilable to our grand 



Foe,/ Who now triumphs , in th' 
excess joy/ Sole reigning holds 
tyranny in Heaven." 

"Farewell, happy fields,/ Where 
joy forever dwells! Hail horrors!/ 
hail. Infernal world! And though, 
profoundest Hell,/ Receive thy new 
possessor, one who brings/ A mind 
not changed by place or time./ The 
mind a place of its own, and in 
itself/ Can make a Heaven of Hell, 
and a Hell of Heav en." 
"Better to reign in Hell, than serve 
in Heaven." 

Talk about amazing. If one 
doesn't know, "Paradise Lost" is 
about the Great War in Heaven 
where Lucifer and his minions were 
cast out of Heaven into a hidden 
place only known by God called 
Hell. After Satan is in Hell, he 
claims that he will do ev erything in 
his power to smite God, and it just 
gets awesome. 

I recommend that everyone read 
both pieces of literature that I have 
just written about because each 
piece really gets the gears turning. 




The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 




Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student. nsula . edu 
November 7, 2012 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Stacey DiFranceso attacks the ball at its highest point for score a point for the Lady Demons. The Demons beat the Stephen F. Austin LadyJacks in straights sets 

NSU blasts past SFA, SHSU 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Staff Reporter 

Nortwestern State's volleyball 
team dominated on Friday 
night in the match against 
Stephen F. Austin. 
For the first time, Lady Demons 
defeated the LadyJacks 3:0 on sets 
inside the walls of Prather Coliseum. 

Lady Demons took first set 25: 1 7. 
The second set was the most dramat- 
ic. NSU volleyball team fought hard 
to win the set 26:24. Lady Demons 



finished strong by winning the third 
set 25:20. By beating Southland 
Conference rival Stephen F. Austin, 
Lady Demons improved to a seven 
matches winning streak, which is the 
most since 1992. 

NSU jumped to 19:8 overall, and 
1 1 :4 in Southland Conference play. 
NSU fell to SFA earlier in the season 
3:1. 

On Friday night. Lady Demons 
had a sweet revenge. The game was 
not only special for the valuable 
victory, but also for Nicole Hajka's 
senior night. Hajka, who is the only 



senior on the volleyball team this 
year, was honored for her four-year 
collegiate volleyball career. 

"I did enjoy my senior night," 
Hajka said. "My teammates sur- 
prised me in the locker room; they 
decorated my locker, and gave me 
baskets." 

"Their win sparked the night 
for me, and the reception after the 
game was great too. I just wish I got 
to play a little bit more considering 
it was my senior night, but it's all 
coach's decision who they put on the 
floor," Hajka said. "The four years 



that I have been at NSU has been a 
great turnout, maybe not volleyball 
in a sense, but 1 have enjoyed my 
four years of getting an education 
and getting the opportunity to expe- 
rience being college athlete." 

I lajka, an outside hitter from Aus- 
tin, TX, is majoring in general stud- 
ies with minor in social science. 

"After the season is over, 1 am 
going to stay here and intern in 
strengthening and conditioning," 
Hajka said. "I am also looking for a 
graduate school. I like animals, so I 
am thinking that maybe going to vet 



school would be a good idea for me, 
and I will see where it takes me. My 
options are really open." 

Yesterday, The Lady Demons took 
out Sam Houston State University, 
the top contender in the conference. 

NSU beat the Lady Bearkats in 
straight sets. The win gives the Lady 
Demons their first 20-win season 
since 1975. 

The volleyball team will chal- 
lenge Central Arkansas and Oral 
Roberts in their last two away 
matches before heading to the SLC 
Tournament . 



Kickoff moved up to 3 for home finale vs. Sam Houston State 

Courtesy of Sports Info 



Northwestern State's football 
home finale next Saturday 
against defending Southland 
Conference champion Sam Houston 
State has been picked up by South- 
land TV, moving up kickoff three 
hours to a 3 o'clock afternoon start 
at Turpin Stadium. 

Local residents can take advan- 
tage of a great entertainment sav- 
ings offer during the second Natchi- 
toches Parish Appreciation Day this 
season. 

A discounted S5 general admis- 
sion ticket is available before next 
Saturday through NSU's Athletic 
Ticket Office (318-357-4268) or 
online at NSUDemons.com us- 
ing the "NSUparish2" promotional 
code. Patrons can purchase up to 
four $5 tickets, representing a 60 
percent savings over standard gen- 
eral admission ticket costs. 

"Our crowds have been fantas- 
tic this season and have been a big 
factor in helping our football team 
go undefeated at home. It all started 
with the first Natchitoches Parish 
Night back on September 8 and we 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Demon football team from 2010 tackles the Bearkat ball carrier. NSU won the game in overtime. 

want to continue that momentum Parish for their incredible support uled to kick off at 6, as all other 

through our final home contest. We this season," said athletics director home games have this season for the 

saw this as a great opportunity to Greg Burke. Demons, but Southland TV's fea- 

thank the residents of Natchitoches The game was originally sched- tured games are shown in a broad- 



cast window that begins at 3 p.m. on 
Saturdays. 

The contest will be the first visit 
to Turpin Stadium by Sam Houston 
State since the Demons posted a 23- 
20 double overtime win over the 
Bearkats to highlight NSU's 2010 
Homecoming celebration. 
"Our team loves playing day games 
and playing on TV, so we're really 
looking forward to kicking off at 
3 o'clock next Saturday afternoon 
in Turpin Stadium," said Demons' 
head coach Bradley Dale Peveto. 

"Our fans have been fantastic this 
year, our students have been awe- 
some and the Spirit of Northwest- 
ern is the best band in all the land. 
It should be a perfect afternoon to 
enjoy a great college football game, 
and we're going to try to wrap up a 
perfect home record to boot." 
The Demons are 4-0 at Turpin Sta- 
dium this year, hoping to complete 
their first unbeaten home slate since 
2004 and the sixth since Turpin Sta- 
dium was dedicated in 1977. 

The game will also be the final 
homefield appearance for 21 senior 
football players who will be recog- 
nized before kickoff. 




Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 



Dynomite: 
Still second 
guessing 
Smith 

So far most NFL teams have 
played eight games and the 
picture of divisional domi- 
nance is becoming clearer. 
The San Francisco 49ers are one of 
the teams that lead their division, and 
their Monday 
Night 
Football 
performance 
against the 
Arizona 
Cardinals 
should have 
eradicated all 
doubts about 
Alex Smith, 
Randy Moss, Michael Crabtree and 
any others negative thoughts tradi- 
tionally associated with the Niners 
of this era. 

Smith and Moss connected on 
what can be called "the play of the 
game." The Niners were faced with 
a 3rd-and-8 from the middle of the 
field. Moss ran a double-move route, 
which should have been stop soon 
after catching the ball. But Moss 
tapped into his younger self and 
slipped away from two would be 
tacklers before darting to the end 
zone. The 47-yard touchdown was 
Moss' 156th of his career, and he's 
now tied for the fourth-most in NFL 
history. 

That play wasn't Moss' best 
highlight of the game. Moss showed 
a youthful disregard for his body 
when he rocked Cardinals' safety 
Kerry Rhodes to allow Crabtree to 
pick up more yards after a short pass. 
Crabtree was becoming a disappoint- 
ing acquisition to most Niner fans. 
He was the 10th overall draft pick in 
2009 but never lived up to the hype 
that came with him. Crabtree caught 
the first touchdown of the game and 
caught another pass for a touchdown 
later in the game. 

This brings me to my last point. 
Smith was the fuel to the Niners' 
offense in the MNF win over the 
Cardinals. It's surprising to see that 
he hasn't broken down mentally as 
much as he has been criticized for 
not being worthy to play profession- 
al throughout his career. 

Even after last year's perfor- 
mance, his role in the public's eye is 
limited to "game manager," and not 
that of a true NFL quarterback. 

Smith connected on 18 of his 19 
throws for 232 yards and three touch- 
downs. He could have had a perfect 
game had it not been for a dropped 
ball by a wide-open receiver. 

Smith is one of the most efficient 
quarterbacks this year, boasting a 
102.1 QBR this season. He is well 
deserv ing of a better reputation now. 
If football fans are waiting for the 
true Smith to show up, they can stop 
waiting because he is here. 

The Niners' next game is against 
another divisional opponent, the 3-5 
St. Louis Rams. St. Louis is com- 
ing off of a miserably 45-7 defeat at 
the hands of the Patriots. Kickoff is 
Sunday at 3:25 p.m. If you're not 
a believer, watch the game to check 
out Smith and his ability to lead his 
team to victory. 



Demon basketball ready for Friday season opener against East Texas Baptist 



Christopher Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

The Demon basketball team 
is ready for the new season. 
After finishing 16-16, 8-8 in 
conference last year before losing in 
the first round of the Southland Con- 
ference Championship Tournament, 
the Demons plan to bounce back this 
season and come out on top in the 
Southland Conference. 

"Naturally, we're excited about 
the 2012-2013 season," Mike Mc- 
Conathy. 13th year Demon basket- 
ball head coach, said. 

The preseason coaches' poll 
placed the Demons at third in the 
conference, behind Oral Roberts and 
Stephen F. Austin. 

"Any time you're ranked by your 



peers, it's very nice to feel," McCo- 
nathy said. "But also, I know that 
puts added pressure on the team to 
go out and succeed. I think that this 
team can be a special team if the 
chemistry is developed between the 
players." 

McConathy added that the team 
isn't focused on where they were 
selected in the preseason poll. The 
goal is to end the season first and not 
third. 

"It's an honor to be considered 
higher ranked than we have been 
in the past couple of years, while at 
the same time, the reality is that it 
doesn't matter." McConathy said. 
"UHtoe end, it matters whether yoii. 
can get the job done or not.' 

The team has strength coming 
from a variety of areas. 



Returning seniors guard Shamir 
Davis and forward James Hulbin 
won first and second team all-con- 
ference honors. 

Hulbin said everyone is on the 
same page about this season and 
knows what to expect. He added that 
McConathy has put the bar high, but 
the team is ready to do what is nec- 
essary. 

Red-shirt freshman Guard Jalan 
West is predicted to be the Southland 
Conference Freshman of the 
Year. . 

"He's a very good back-court 
player to compliment Shamir 
Davis," McConathy said. 

The team is looking for help from 
Demon basketball fans and NSU 
students this season. 

"It would be great for students 
to get involved with this team, and 



try to latch on to them," McConathy 
said. "It can be a lot of fun to watch, 
and the energy is very high. Students 
should understand how much they 
could help our sports teams if they 
got into the game." 

"When you watch sports games 
from all the bigger schools and you 
see the support from the fans, 
and you ask 'Why not here?' McCo- 
nathy added. 

"Whatever we can do to reach out 
to the student community, we would 
love to do. To improve the relation- 
ship between the students and our 
players is something we would be 
more than happy to do." 

The Demons' opening game of 
the season is against the East Texas 
Baptist Tigers on Friday, 
Nov. 9th at 7:00 p.m. at Prather Coli- 
seum. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Senior Shamir Davis earned Southland Conference honors. 





Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, November 14, 2012 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 10 



Mobile app class ignites student innovation 



Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 

IS 4200 is keeping up 
with the times. This 
semester, Sarah Wright teaches a 
class about designing applications. 

CIS 4200 is a topics class, which 
means that the subject changes 
every semester, but Wright would 
like to make app development a 
permanent part of the curriculum. 

She admitted the class needs to be 
tweaked and that the faculty needs 
to come together to make some 
decisions. 

Wright would like there to also be 
a beginners app development class. 
" I do believe mobile apps are here 
to stay in the curriculum," Wright 

said. 

The class teaches a lot of 
programming and instead of just 
focusing on one platform, the class 
allows the students to take the 
basics and create an app for iOS, 
Windows, or Blackberry. 

Wright said that this choice allows 
the students to be more involved 
and creative in their assignments 
while keeping them excited about 
the programming. Each student 
chooses a platform and creates an 
app for it for their final project. 



The students are free to choose 
which type of app they would like 
to create from games, social media, 
music apps or anything they can 
think of. 

'"They get to use their imaginations," 
Wright said. 

James Nelson and classmate Matt 
Foschee placed first in a competition 
at the Association of Information 
Technology Professionals. The 
app for competition has been in 
the works since last spring and is 
preparation for another competition 
this upcoming spring. 
Nelson chose to make an app that 
checked fuel consumption. 

"It will store the previous mileage 
and calculate the miles per gallon 
based on the current mileage and 
the amount of gas it took to fill up 
the vehicle," Nelson said. 
"Basically, it was a multipage 
application that used the device's 
camera, location and internal 
storage. I used this for practice 
because I thought that any future 
competitions would require similar 
elements, and as expected the AITP 
conference was required to utilize 
some of the same elements as the 
one I had been working on." 

Foschee's in class project is an 
app that keeps track of his hours as 
a student worker and can send the 




Photo Courtesy of News Bureau 

Programming expertise opens opportunities for graduates. As mobile app demand grows, CIS students learn to design their own. 



reports to him or his supervisor. 

According to Wright there has 
been an even split between the three 
platforms when it comes to her 
students' final projects. While most 
of these students have not had any 



experience in making apps, a lot of 
their previous learning applies here 
where the same rules are used in a 
new environment. 
Wright believes the class so far is 
a success and intends to bring more 



classes like it in the future. 
"Corporations will hire employees 
who are specialists in operation 
systems to create in-house apps not 
sold to the public," Wright said. 
"It's an exciting recruiting tool for 



us. High school students see that 
we're on the cusp and they want 
to come here and participate. Our 
students are problem solvers. They 
like to figure things out. This gives 
them a good foundation." 




Photo Courtesy of News Bureau 

The Weyerhaeuser grant will fund travel and related expenses for faculty, as well as new 
printed literature and other initiatives. 

ET program gets Weyerhaeuser grant 

Courtesy of News Bureau 



Northwestern State Universi- 
ty's engineering technology 
program received SI 0,000 
through the Weyerhaeuser Giving 
Fund Grant program. 

The funds will be used to help 
attract more students to NSU's 
engineering technology program 
and educate them about careers 
in manufacturing available to ET 
graduates. 

"We will be reaching out to sec- 
ondary schools in communities 
within a 50-mile radius of each 
Weyerhaeuser location. Those 
communities include Dodson, 
Holden, Natchitoches, Ruston, 
Simsboro/Arcadia, Taylor, Zvvolle 
and associated communities that 



fall within the 50-mile radius of 
each, " said Dr. Phil Brown, as- 
sociate professor and principal in- 
vestigator of the grant. 

"The primary purpose will be 
to make counselors and students 
aware of the STEM [science, tech- 
nology, engineering, mathematics] 
career opportunities within the 
Louisiana manufacturing com- 
munity, the secondary education 
preparation requirements for entry 
into manufacturing and the post 
secondary opportunities for stu- 
dents in Northwestern State's en- 
gineering technology program." 

The Weyerhaeuser grant will 
fund travel and related expenses 
for faculty, as well as new printed 
literature and other initiatives. 
Brown hopes to inform prospec- 



tive students and their parents 
about in-state job opportunities in 
manufacturing, salary scales and 
the high tech working conditions 
of modern manufacturing facili- 
ties. 

Students will have a better un- 
derstanding of what high school 
courses they should take that will 
better prepare them for classes in 
the engineering technology pro- 
gram, Brown said. 

He also hopes ET faculty can 
work more closely with school 
counselors who advise students on 
their post-secondary options. 

For more information on North- 
western State's engineering tech- 
nology program, visit engrtech. 
nsula.edu. 



Civic leader recognized for service to NSU 









: « ,m • 

$ ■■ 












Photo Courtesy of News Bureau 
The family of the late Tom Murchison accepted the honor. 

Northwestern State University honored the late Tom Murchison with the 
President's Distinguished Service Award in recognition of his service to the 
university and to the Natchitoches community. Murchison's family accepted 
the award during the Nov. 10 football game in Turpin Stadium. NSU Presi- 
dent Dr. Randall J. Webb presented the award to members of the Murchison 
family. From left, Farrah Murchison, Vicki Murchison, Ava Murchison, Tommy 
Murchison, Gretchen Murchison, Anna Grace Murchison, Ian Murchison, Tim 
Murchison, Tyler Murchison, Lane Murchison and Garrett Murchison with 
NSU director of university advancement, Brad Laird. 



Mr. & Miss NSU 

Runoff Elections Today! 

Online Polls Open 
12 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. 

Visit the link to vote! 
http://nsula.orgsync.com/org/nsusga 





Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Sunday 


Monday 


Tuesday 


2 Life 


63730° 


65/34° 


65/36° 


68739° 


71742° 


73750° 


70/51° 


3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



















Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
November 14, 2012 



Helping Hands hosts Fall Festival 



Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 

With the semester com- 
ing to an end and finals 
quickly approaching, 
Helping Hands hosted its annual 
Fall Fest to give NSU students a 
time to relax Tuesday night in the 
Student Union Ballroom. Admis- 
sion was free to all students, and 
refreshments were served. 

Music filled the room while 
college students laughed, played 
games and enjoyed refreshments. 
At the Fall Fest, students played 
games such as Taboo, Wheel of 
Fortune and Twister. 

"They can come and have a 
good time because by this time 
students are spent," Jamie Flana- 
gan, Helping Hands and Student 
Support Service advisor and in- 
structor, said. 

"The Fall Fest is a 'Hakuna 



Matata' moment for students," 
Flanagan said. 

The students can come with 
no worries. 

Helping Hands is a student or- 
ganization on campus sponsored 
by the Student Support Services. 
The organization lends a helping 
hand to those affected by natu- 
ral disasters (such as hurricane 
relief), boys and girls club and 
nursing homes. 

This.year, Helping Hands will 
donate the money raised at the 
Fall Fest to Toys for Tots. The 
organization asked students who 
attended the Fall Festival to do- 
nate toys. 

Since 2005, Helping Hands 
has hosted Fall Fest. 

"Originally Helping Hands' 
Fall Fest was put together for 
elementary students in the sur- 
rounding areas to have fun on 
NSU's campus, but other schools 



started to host their own Fall Fest 
leaving Helping Hands to host its 
fest for just NSU students," Fla- 
nagan said. 

The preparation for the Fall 
Festival began early this fall se- 
mester. For Flanagan, it some- 
times became frustrating because 
of last minute preparation. Ac- 
cording to Flanagan working 
with college students was inter- 
esting. 

The preparation was broken 
into four committees. Some stu- 
dents were in charge of public 
relations, music, food, games 
or reserving a place. At the end 
of the night, all Helping Hands 
members helped to clean up. Fla- 
nagan considered the prepara- 
tions a learning experience for 
the students. 

"It gives Helping Hands stu- 
dents a chance to learn leader- 
ship," Flanagan said. 




Photo By Josh Mitchell 

Students realease their inner child as they play games at Helping Hands annual Fall Fest. 




Submitted Photo 

Consumer electronics like the Amazon Kindle and Samsung Tablet pic- 
tured, are some of the most popular Black Friday purchases. 

Black Friday: a time to shop or 
one we wish we were able to? 




not 



It's once again that 
time of year when 
our families spend 
hours cooking a giant 
turkey stuffed with the 
most delicious of dress- 
ings. Many consumers will 
purchase these plucked 
birds until the last min- Jacob Labutka 
ute and hope to acquire Style Columnist 
the last Butterball just 
hours before Thanksgiving. 

Regardless of how your 
Thanksgiving meal is prepared 
this year, the real celebration 
does not occur until after con- 
suming large amounts of poultry 
and cranberry sauce. Attention 
shoppers: prepare for the chaos 
known as Black Friday. 
The Friday after Thanksgiving is 
often cited as one of the busiest 
shopping days of the year due to 
the special sales that can be ac- 
quired. Stores lure their custom- 
ers with enticing prices that can 
only be had by those who wait 
by the entrance doors for hours 
(even days) before their doors 
open. 

For example, only the first few 
people in line at Best Buy will 
acquire the "special deal" laptops 
because they will most likely 
only have a few in stock. The rest 
of us will have to purchase items 
that are not very reduced from the 
original price (if at all). 

Some of you may like the idea 
of waiting for hours or days out- 
side a store in order to receive the 
best deals. The rest of us prefer 



to either see what the store 
has left in the middle of 
Black Friday or just stay 
home cuddled in our fuzzy 
socks drinking hot cocoa. 
There are some stores 
that are attempting to extend con- 
sumer access of their 
deals. Wal-Mart is guar- 
anteeing that customers 
will be able to purchase 
select discount electronics if they 
are in line between 10 and 11 
p.m. on Thanksgiving night. 

Many of us want to avoid the 
traffic and lines and will decide 
to partake in these seasonal deals 
online on either Black Friday or 
Cyber Monday. Certain websites 
like Amazon are counting down 
to when their best deals begin. 

If you want to purchase an 
item online on either one of these 
days, then you must prepare for 
a speedy purchase before popular 
items run out. Know the online 
store you want to purchase from 
and make sure you have an ac- 
count set up with your credit card 
and shipping address informa- 
tion. This way you can make your 
purchase at the stroke of midnight 
by the touch of a few clicks. 

Take advantage of the sales 
if you are lucky enough to have a 
full piggy bank. But if you need- 
ed money and had to smash your 
piggy bank with a hammer, then 
there's nothing wrong with tak- 
ing advantage of a warm fire and 
Thanksgiving leftovers. 



Students win big at Vera Bradley Bingo 




Photo By Josh Mitchell 

Students won big Tuesday night at Phi Mu Fraternity's annual Vera Bradley Bingo event. Partici- 
pants had a chance to win Vera Bradley bags valued at over $150, as well as other men's mer- 
chandise with all proceeds benefiting Children's Miracle Network 
Phi Mu's national philanthropy, of Christus St. Francis Cabrini in 
Alexandria, LA. This year's goal was to raise at least $7,000. 



For the full story: check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.corQ 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

Tun Size" 

Rated PG-13 

4:20 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

'Skyfall" 

Rated PG-13 

3:50 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

'Alex Cross" 

Rated PG-13 

4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"Sinister 

Rated R 

4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 



Easy to make Nutella s'more bars 



Courtesy of 
Chef-In- Training.com 
Course: Dessert 
Skill Level: Easy 
Combines two of the greatest 
things on earth! This recipe is def- 
initely one that needs to be made 
soon! 

INGREDIENTS 
1/2 cup butter softened 
1 /4 cup brown sugar 
1/2 cup sugar 
1 egg 

1 tsp. vanilla extract 
1 1/3 cups flour 

3/4 cup graham cracker crumbs 
1 tsp. baking powder 
1/4 tsp. salt 
1 cup Nutella 

1 (7 oz.) jar marshmallow creme- 
fluff 

INSTRUCTIONS 

1 .Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. 



2. In a large bowl, cream butter 
and sugars together. 

3. Add in egg and vanilla extract 
and beat until well combined. 

4. Add flour, graham cracker 
crumbs, baking powder and salt 
and beat until well incorporated. 

5. Divide dough in half. Mash half 
of the dough into the bottom of a 
greased 8x8 pan. 

6. Spread Nutella over the top of 
the dough. 

7. Carefully spread marshmallow 
cream over top of the Nutella 

8. Carefully spread remaining 
dough over the top of marshmal- 
low creme. For me, it helped to 
press the dough flat in my hands, 
piece by piece, and lay it over the 
top. until entire top was covered. 

9. Bake at 350 degrees F for about 
30 minutes or until lightly gold- 
en brown. Let it cool completely 
before cutting it up into squares. 
ENJOY! 




The Current Sauce staff would like to wish 
everyone a safe and Happy Thanksgiving! 






pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
November 14, 2012 



Keeping Thanksgiving alive in a consumerist culture 




If you look around this time of 
year, especially in Louisiana's 
"City of Lights." you would 
be troubled to find something 
distinctly Thanksgiving-themed. 

When I say 
Thanksgiving, 
I don't mean 
fall colored 
baubles or 
leaf-shaped 
table toppers, 

Catherine Beverly 1 mean 

Opinions Editor honest - 
to-God 

Thanksgiving decorations. 

Instead of these traditional 
American festivities, we see the 
burgeoning Christmas aisles and the 
50 percent off remains of fall decor. 
Why is this? Why do department 
stores now skip over paper turkeys 
and ceramic "Made in China" 
Horns of Plenty? 

My assumption is that this recent 
phenomenon is due to the overtly 
capitalist nature of our economy 
and has led to the devaluation of the 
celebration of Thanksgiving. That 
same attitude thrives in popular 
stores, such as Wal-Mart Macy's, 




The "Give Thanks" Jar 

Materials: mason jar, hot glue gun, decorating supplies 
(ribbon, buttons, pens, etc.), and cardstock 

• Decorate the mason jar using ribbon and hot glue. 
Use a larger strip of ribbon around the middle. 

• Using the pens and buttons, personalize the jar 
with designs and words, such as "THANKS" or your 
name. 

• Cut strips of paper about one inch thick and five 
inches long (as many as you want!) 

• Write something you are thankful for on each strip 
and add them to the mason jar. 

FOR A CUTE GIFT IDEA 

• Instead of writing things you are thankful for, write 
things you like about another person and present it 
to them as a Thanksgiving themed gift. 



Instructions for a generic "Give Thanks" jar for Thanksgiving. 



Photo from blogs.capscreation.com 



and it's a shame. 

Maybe it used to be true that 
Thanksgiving was a marketable 
holiday, but that is no longer the 
case. 

Thanksgiving doesn't have the 
inherent choice of selection that 
Halloween does: witch or ghost? 



chocolate or gummy bears? 

Thanksgiving also lacks the 
pop culture icon of Santa Claus, 
something that even secular 
families could enjoy. Instead there 
are images of cheerful turkeys that 
make you doubt your life as an 
omnivore. No one likes celebrating 



a holiday sitting next to a caricature 
of their meal. 

So, why would manufacturers 
spend money selling Thanksgiving 
specific items when you can lump 
the entirety of "autumn" into one 
category? With that excuse, an 
entire season can be crammed into 



an aisle's worth of room. 

I'm not implying that 
Thanksgiving is disappearing from 
our lives. In fact, the idea of giv ing 
thanks is picking up a lot of interest 
in the Internet community this year. 

This occurs mostly when 
Facebook users post a series of 
statuses throughout the month of 



November to document the things 
that make them most thankful. 

Many families will still spend 
the Thursday morning cooking 
and preparing a homemade 
Thanksgiving meal. They will sit , 
around their table and eat to their 
heart's content, only budging when 
the (now-traditional) Thanksgiving 
Day game starts. 

I don't necessarily like the 
fictional backdrop Thanksgiving is 
founded upon-"Oh. the colonists 
were best friends with the Native 
Americans. They invited them over 
for dinner and they all ate and were 
merry"- but the idea is important. 
We're a society filled with wants: I 
want a new phone, a new car. a new 
house, a new job. 

Even more importantly than that, 
we are a society that is wanting. 
We are wanting of a sense of self- 
control and of limits. I believ e 
sitting down and giv ing thanks for 
what you were lucky enough to 
receive helps people realize how 
much they really have. 

In honor of that, I have a short 
activity below called the "Give 
Thanks" jar that could help you get 
into the spirit of Thanksgiving. 



Consequences of America's partisanship 



In every election, it is probably the case that one 
candidate is an actively better choice than the 
other, and it is up to the public to decide which, 
and in what ways. When Ronald Reagan ran against 
Walter Mondale in 1984. the choice seemed clear. 
Reagan swept 49 states, winning 525 electoral votes 
the most in history. 

The nation seemed almost wholly pleased 
with Reagan: Mondale seemed frail in 
comparison, and his campaign was an abject 
failure. 

I think that more campaigns should be 
abject failures. When a nation gravitates 
towards equal and opposite poles, I sincerely 
doubt that it is the result of two equal and 
opposite candidates promoting two equal 
and opposite philosophies. Logic demands 
otherwise. 

One of them is necessarily better, and the fact that as 
rational beings we find consensus impossible - and in 
such a uniform and intractable way - suggests failure 
on the parts of candidates, the media and of course, the 
public itself. 

It is the public I am most concerned with. I used the 
phrase "rational beings" but this does not necessarily 
suggest consistently rational behavior. 

In fact, as a species, we seem prone to rational 
failures, and the two-party system reflects a significant 
one. 

To submit ourselves to exactly two labels, and then 
to expect either of these labels to describe every facet of 
our respective identities, almost transcends the notion 
of rational failure. It is completely insane. 

Where would we be without parties to claim us? The 
idea is unpalatable to some. To me, it is almost Utopian: 
a world in which beliefs are no longer borrowed from 
tradition, where people do not formulate political 
identities by letting preexisting platforms command 
their opinions, where we all begin as blank mental 
slates and build our own ideologies from the ground up. 

I am generally in favor of smaller government and 
restricted spending. These are perfectly defensible 
positions that find their basis in pragmatism. But 
according to a great many, this also suggests that I 
am probably opposed to gay marriage. This is not a 
rationally defensible position. 

I cannot fathom why economic policy is at all 
connected to the issue of marriage equality. It is for 
this reason that adhering flatly to partisan politics is a 
dangerous practice. It discourages actual consideration 
of issues. 

It seems to me that a great many people first decide 




Justin Woodard 

Guest columnist 



to be Republicans or Democrats, and subsequently 
accept the beliefs handed down by that role. 

Like most inherited opinions, it is completely 
arbitrary, and in a representative democracy, wherein 
the voters have the power to change the course of their 
nation's future, arbitrariness cannot be afforded. The 
concept of a straight-ticket voter— and I have 
met a few terrifies me. 

The implications of partisanship extend 
beyond the irrationalities of the voter. It also 
cultivates a political atmosphere that responds 
to this irrationality. 

Campaigns, I have come to learn, are not so 
much about solutions to problems as they are 
about a candidate's repetitious adherence to 
his party's ideology. 

The problem is, of course, that not all 
candidates actually adhere very strongly to their party's 
ideology. But in many places, the moment a candidate 
shows his dark centrist intentions, he becomes 
unelectable. Consequently the public is presented with 
a year-long (or longer) spectacle of deliberate opacity, 
implausibly glamorous promises and flat lies. 

These are the criteria by which we are meant to elect 
our president, and our dual parties are at fault. Why 
don't we demand more? Why do we insist on molly- 
coddling those people that intend to represent us? 

Once your name is on any sort of ballot, you have 
crossed out of the realm of our day-to-day, too-polite 
conversation. You should then be subject to the strictest 
level of scrutiny. 

There should be no question too direct and no point 
too damning because only those people capable of 
w ithstanding real questions and real criticisms deserve 
the support of the electorate. 

But first the electorate has to be interested in asking 
the questions, and partisan thinking does not tend to 
give way to genuine concern and curiosity. A devout 
party-member is more concerned with the success of his 
party than pragmatic solutions. 

Here is a not-so-hidden truth: good solutions to 
bad problems have come from both Democrats and 
Republicans, from both liberalism and conservatism. 

There is no creed that is 100 percent correct, no 
politician who is nev er wrong and no platform that can 
sum up the precise views of any one individual. 

Let us abandon our ties to creeds that were not 
created for us. Let us scrape off our partisan bumper 
stickers. 

If we need political persuasions, let us call ourselv es 
pragmatists. We do what works - nothing less, and 
nothing more. 







Chris Degeytet 


Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 




Sauce Reporter 






Jessica Blow 


Dr. Paula Furr 




Sauce Reporter 


Adviser 
Ty Johnson 


Kirstie White 

Copy Editor 


JC Bryant 

Social Media 


News Editor 
Alexis Reliford 


Jacob Labutka 

Lifestyle Columnist 


Camille Mosley 

Freshman Scholar 


Life Editor 
Jimmie Walker 


Andrea Nederostova 

Sauce Reporter 


Taylor Furr 

Delivery Personnel 


Sports Editor 
Catherine Beverly 






Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 


Office phone 
318-357-5456 


Opinions Editor 


Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 





www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Sex trend in young adult literature 



I have been an avid reader ever 
since "Twilight" came out. I 
remember walking around the 
book section in Wal-mart with my 
mom because she was 
the reader of the family. I 
saw the cover for the first 
three "Twilight" books and 
thought they looked rather 
intriguing because of the 
simplistic design. 

Having no clue what 
any of the books w ere 
about, I bought the first 
one. I became obsessed, 
reading the first book eight times, 
the second one twice, the third one 
twice and the last one once. I even 
started the Twilight trend in my 
hometown. 

After reading all four books, 
I went through a phase where I 
thought no other book could or 
would be better than the "Twilight" 
series. I actually had good reason 
for this because soon after 




"Twilight" became nationally then 
globally popular, all of the books 
coming out had everything to do 
with the supernatural, vampires in 
particular. 

I tried a couple of other 
series, but none really 
caught my interest. I'd read 
a few series here and there, 
but all of the plots were the 
same. A chick would fall in 
love w ith a supernatural. 

Camille Mosley broodin S creature < he 

ci c i i would leave in the second 
tresnman Scholar 

book, ensuing a love 
triangle so on and so forth. 

Even after "Fifty Shades of 
Grey" came out, suddenly authors 
came out with all of these BDSM 
books. I mean, "Fifty Shades" was 
good and all, but I don't want to 
read about BDSM or sex in general 
all of the time. I, personally, enjoy a 
good plot, some romance and some 
action-all of that stuff that makes a 
great novel. 



But alas, authors are now stuck 
on the trend of sex for books. Anne 
Rice even came out with a BDSM 
book. Seriously Anne? I thought 
that she of all people would be 
above that. I guess not. 

Books these days have no real 
plot and are in the business for the 
money. 

That in and of itself is a shame 
because there are some great books 
out there that are being overlooked, 
such as "Howl's Moving Castle" 
for instance. That is a phenomenal 
book, not to mention the movie is 
actually amazing. 

Also, I recommend "The 
Immortal Instruments" series along 
with, well, anything written by 
Cassandra Clare. Sarah Dessen is 
also a great author who doesn't 
follow the trends. 

All I'm saying is that there are 
a lot better books out there than 
Christian Grey and Edward Cullen 
wannabes. Try them out sometime! 



We need writers! 

Our newspaper needs stories written by students. Come by our 
office, 227 Kyser, if you would like to join. 

Meetings every Monday at 6:50 p.m. We hope to hear from 
you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
November 14, 2012 



Demons start season strong , zoom past Campbell Camels 



Christopher Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

The Demon Basketball team 
started strong in its opening 
games. 

The Demons started the season 
at home Friday night with a win 
against the East Texas Baptist Ti- 
gers, 118-77. 

"I thought we did a great job of 
running the floor and getting up and 
down," Mike McConathy, Demon 
head coach, said. "We did a great 
job, and a lot of that had to do with 
the match ups. We had smaller guys 
out on the court that could guard 
them and keep them in front of us." 

Freshman guard Jalan West led 
the team with 26 points, 8 assists, 
5 rebounds and 3 steals. West also 
played the most time for the team at 
22 minutes. 

Wesfs great play was no surprise 
though. He came into the season as 
the favorite to win Southland Con- 
ference Freshman of the Year. 

"We should have picked up on 
defense a bit better, but getting the 
win was pretty easy so we're thank- 
ful for that," West said. "I thank my 
teammates for getting me open in 
the right spots, just getting in to keep 
shooting." 

Following West was senior guard 
Shamir Davis with 19 points, 3 as- 
sists and a rebound. Davis played for 
21 minutes. He also came into the 
season rated well, making first team 
all-conference honors. 

"We got a great start today, we 
came in and played a great team in 
ETBU," Davis said. All of our guys 
came to play." 







, .... 



Photo by Will Bratten 

Junior College transfer DeQuan Hicks soars over the Camel defender to knock down a short range jump shot. The Demons beat the Camels, 71-67. 



West and Davis were both ex- 
pected to do well playing off of each 
other this season as a pair. The strat- 
egy clearly paid off for the Demons. 

"They are very talented players," 
McConathy said. The more they 
come along, and the more Shamir 



and Jalan play off of each other, 
they'll be tough to handle. Shamir 
gets out in front of Jalan and then 
Jalan will give him the ball, where 
he can take it to the hole or get other 
players involved. Shamir did a good 
job and we just want him to continue 



to run the floor hard and make things 
happen." 

Of West specifically, McCona- 
thy said he had an excellent game 
as well as a rookie in his first career 
college game. 

"We expect great things out of 



all of our Demons, but we're extra 
excited about Jalan," he said. 

The Demons took the momentum 
from their home opener and played 
their first road game this week as 
well. The Demons beat the Campbell 
Camels on Monday night, 71-67. 



The Demons move on to another 
game on Saturday afternoon against 
the Hannibal-LaGrange Trojans at 
Prather Coliseum at 2 p.m. The Tro- 
jans are 0-5 coming into the game 
with the Demons. 



Perez leads Lady Demons in comeback win 



Matthew Fowler 

Sports Info 

Northwestern State followed 
freshman Janelle Perez's 
lead to overcome an eight- 
point deficit with just over seven 
minutes to play to beat Alcorn State 
55-50 Monday at Prather Coliseum. 
Perez scored 21 points to clinch 
NSU's (2-0) first two-game win 
streak to open a season since 2007. 
Her three-pointer at 7:19 helped 
spark a 10-point run to take the lead 
at 5:45 left in the game. 
"I'm really proud of our kids, their 
effort, and the way they continued 
to fight tonight," said new co-head 
Brooke Stoehr. "They are trying to 
figure it out, and we're going to fig- 
ure it out together. We'll run into 
some battles and we just have to run 
together and fight through it." 
Down 43-35, Perez sank a 3-pointer 
from behind the arc followed by an- 
other trey from Keisha Lee cutting 
Alcorn's lead to 43-41 . 
Jasmine Bradley forced Alcorn's Isis 
Smith into a turnover and hit a fast- 
break layup to tie the game at the 
6:01 mark. 

With 5:45 to play, Perez grabbed the 
lead with two free throws. The clos- 
est Alcorn would get after that was 
within two. 

"I'm really proud of her (Perez). She 
had a few turnovers and I'm going to 
give her a hard time," said Stoehr. 
"She battled and she competed her 
heart out. 

"That's what we need from that posi- 
tion," she said. "We need consistent 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Freshman Janelle Perez races down the court on a fast break. 



play out of her and she played 36 
minutes giving it her all." 
Bradley led the pack with six re- 
bounds on the night with six points. 
Jasmine Upchurch ranked second on 
the team with eight points and five 
rebounds. 

Lee finished with seven points. Five 
of those came in the closing minutes 
of the game. 

"She can really stretch a defense," 
said Stoehr "We just need her to fig- 
ure out our defense because we need 
her on the floor." 

Alcorn State (0-2) was led offensive- 
ly by Carolinsia Crumbly, who had 
15 points, and Au-Juvan Andrews, 
who contributed 13. 



The Lady Demons shot 38 percent 
from the field while the Lady Braves 
hit 37 percent. Alcorn State edged 
NSU in rebounding 34-3 1 . 
Stoehr praised her team's resilience 
and that of the NSU fans in the Lady 
Demons' home court debut. 
"I couldn't be more proud of the 
way they responded when they got 
down," said Stoehr. "So thankful for 
the crowd tonight. We can't promise 
them wins, but we can say our kids 
are going to play hard and compete." 
The Lady Demons will travel to Ox- 
ford, Miss, to take on Ole Miss at 1 1 
a.m. Friday. Their next home game 
is next Tuesday against Wiley Col- 
lege. 





91JFM 



ofKNWD 








Photo by Wendell Wilkes 
Harry Briggs talks tennis with Lady Demon tennis player Tatiana Larina after the tournament. 

Tennis team participates in fundraiser 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Staff Reporter 

If you came to the Leesville ten- 
nis courts last Saturday, you saw 
many people smiling, playing 
tennis and hav ing fun. Harry Briggs 
started a tradition five years ago — he 
established a tennis tournament fun- 
draiser for nursing students at North- 
western State Leesville campus. 

Briggs, who is also known as 
"The Paddling Professor" is 91 years 
old, but still teaches political science 
courses at the NSU-Leesville cam- 
pus. He has been devoted supporter 
of NSU athletics for years. 

"Harry Briggs established this 
scholarship." Patric DuBois. Lady 
Demon tennis head coach, said. "He 
started this in a conjunction with the 
tennis team. He has always been a 
tennis supporter, and he felt like we 



can get together on this. The tennis 
team from Natchitoches can come 
down to Leesville to promote ten- 
nis, and at the same time do work for 
our cause of raising a scholarship for 
nursing students." 

The Lady Demon tennis team 
has been participating in this tour- 
nament every fall for the past five 
years. The fundraiser took place in 
the hometown of NSU tennis player 
Amy Williams who was recently 
awarded with a Sportsmanship 
award. 

"I was actually born and raised 
in Leesville," Williams said. "I love 
to participate in this fundraiser be- 
cause these people have seen me 
grow up, and it's cool to get them 
involved with NSU tennis. Harry 
Briggs has been in charge of this 
fundraiser. The team loves him, and 
we all are always glad to see him be- 



cause he is one of our biggest sup- 
porters. At this fundraiser everybody 
is guaranteed to play three doubles 
matches win or lose. It's fun for us 
because it's not about winning, but 
about having fun and getting people 
involved." 

Other participants of this fund- 
raiser are people from the Leesville 
community such as local doctors 
and an art professor. One participant 
came all the way from Houston. TX 
to support the fundraiser. 

"This fundraiser supports two 
S500 scholarships to be awarded to 
nursing students at the NSU-Lees- 
ville campus," DuBois said. "The 
first three years we were raising 
money for only one S500 scholar- 
ship. Two years ago, it has turned 
into two scholarships because we 
have got more people involved." 




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items on Dinner Menu. 



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Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, November 28, 2012 * Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 1 1 



Annual Christmas Gala to be held Nov. 28-30 



Courtesy of News Bureau 

The Mrs. H.D. Dear Sr. and 
Alice E. Dear School of 
Creative and Performing 
Arts at Northwestern State 
University will present the 24th- 
annual Christmas Gala Nov. 28-30 
in the A. A. Fredericks Auditorium. 
Performance times are at 7 p.m. 
each evening with a 9 p.m. show on 
Friday, Nov. 30. 

Tickets are S10 and will be sold 
prior to each performance on 
a first-come, first-served basis. 
Northwestern State, BPCC@NSU 
and Louisiana School for Math, 
Science and the Arts students are 
admitted free with a current student 
I.D. Tickets will not be available in 
advance. 

There will also be four 
performances for area school 
children at 9:30 a.m. and noon 
on Nov. 28-29. Admission for 
the children's show is $3. Those 
planning to bring groups to the 
children's show should make 
reservations by calling Jane Norman 
at (318) 357-4483. 

The Gala will feature the 
Natchitoches-Northwestern 
Symphony Orchestra, the NSU 



choirs, Northwestern State 
Department of Theatre and Dance. 
The NSU Jazz Orchestra, NSU 
Rockettes, NSU Percussion 
Ensemble, The Out-on-a-Limb 
Improv Troupe, and video and 
visual art provided by Northwestern 
State Department of Fine + Graphic 
Arts. 

"The Gala is based on the same 
format as the Radio City Music Hall 
production and will be a family 
friendly show that highlights the 
talent we have in the School of 
Creative and Performing Arts," said 
Rorex. 

"There will be several new 
numbers along with audience 
favorites from past shows such 
as the Dance of the Toy Wooden 
Soldiers, The Percussion Ensemble, 
and the order of monks." 

Among the additions to the Gala 
will be Schubert's Ave Maria 
performed by the NSU Lyric and 
choreographed by dance instructor 
Brett Garfinkel and a new number 
from the Nutcracker Suite. 

The performance will be enhanced 
by a digital organ donated to the 
performances by the Rogers Organ 
Company that will bring the sounds 
of a real pipe organ to the Gala. 

"It takes several hundred 




Photo Courtesy of News Bureau 

Nearly 300 students and participants collaborated to prepare for the 24th annual Christmas Gala. 

Annual Christmas Gala 
When: Nov. 28-30 at 7 p.m. 



combined hours to put together 
our one-hour Gala and we have 
nearly 300 hundred students 
and participants," said Rorex. 
"Performers, stage hands, designers. 



costumers, directors and conductors 
make this production one of the 
most excellent beginnings to the 
Christmas season." 



Where: A.A. Fredricks Auditorium 
Admission: $10 to non-students 




Photo Courtesy of News Bureau 

The Weyerhaeuser Grant will fund travel and related expenses for faculty, as well as new 
printed literature and other initiatives. 

Nursing scholarship targets local students 



Courtesy of News Bureau 



Natchitoches Community Care 
Center contributed to a schol- 
arship to benefit nursing stu- 
dents pursuing clinical studies. 

The Natchitoches Community 
Care Center Endowed Scholar- 
ship in Nursing is a $500 one-year 
award, with preference for a Natchi- 
toches resident. The Center, former- 
ly known as Heritage Manor, estab- 
lished the scholarship in 2006. 

The ideal scholarship recipient is 
"someone who will use their nurs- 
ing skills in long-term care. 

We hope the scholarship will pre- 
pare a great nurse who inspires oth- 
ers to become nurses," said Maria 
Mapa. administrator. 



Mapa said long-term care nursing 
fosters a close relationship between 
residents and caregivers. 

"Long- term care is a different type 
of work," Mapa said. "You get the 
know the residents and they know 
you. You become attached to them 
and you get to know their children 
and grandchildren and are more fa- 
miliar with their medical problems. 
You can't help but get close to them." 

Natchitoches Community Care 
Center is a non-traditional facility 
with community kitchens and living 
areas based on a household model. 
Mapa said the focus of her staff is to 
"maintain the quality of life for the 
residents." 

"With a projected shortage of nurs- 
es that is expected to intensify as 
baby boomers age, we are grateful 



to Natchitoches Community Care 
Center for their continued support of 
students who feel called to careers in 
health care." said Brad Laird, direc- 
tor of University Advancement. 



For more 
information 

Contact Brad Laird 
at (318)357-4414 

or visit 

northwesternalumni.com 



Faculty member contributes to book tower 




Photo Courtesy of News Bureau 
MacDonald contributes to book used to create a tower in Washington. 

Dr. James MacDonald has found his research used in a way he never ex- 
pected. MacDonald, an associate professor of history at Northwestern State 
University, contributed a chapter to the book, Lincoln's Enduring Legacy: 
Perspectives from Great Thinkers, Great Leaders, and the American Experi- 
ment, which was used in a creative sculpture at the Ford Theatre Center for 
Education and Leadership in Washington D.C. 

The book was one of 200 titles used as part of a three story tower which rises 
34 feet. MacDonald's chapter, Theodore Roosevelt and the Heirs of Abraham 
Lincoln, discusses the manner in which Roosevelt emulated Lincoln's lead- 
ership style at various points during his presidency. MacDonald delivered 
a paper on the subject at a conference at LSU-Shreveport, which led being 
included in the book. 

More information about the book titles and the making of the tower is avail- 
able at fords.org/home/explore-lincoln/lincoln-book-tower. 

MacDonald received his Ph.D. from LSU in 2006. He joined the faculty of 
Northwestern State in 2007. He teaches classes in American history, special- 
izing in the colonial and revolutionary periods. 





Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Sunday 


Monday 


Tuesday 


2 Life 


63730° 


65/34° 


65/36° 


68739° 


71742° 


73750° 


70/51° 


3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



















Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 

arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
November 28, 2012 



Kim wins state piano competition 



News Bureau 

Northwestern State Uni- 
versity student MinJeong 
Kim recently won first 
place in the Young Artist divi- 
sion of the annual Louisiana Mu- 
sic Teachers Association piano 
competition. She will advance to 
regional competition in January. 

Kim performed works by 
Bach, Mozart, Chopin and Dutil- 
leux during the 60-minute com- 
petition covering the baroque, 
classical, romantic and 20th cen- 
tury periods. 

"It was a difficult competi- 
tion with a great deal of music to 
rehearse and remember from four 
different periods," said Kim, a 
senior music major from Seoul, 
South Korea. 

Kim was the grand prize win- 
ner of the 2011 Marjorie Strick- 
lin Emerging Artists Competi- 



tion in Monroe. She won the 
2011 Rapides Symphony Con- 
certo Competition and the 2009 
Natchitoches-Northwestern Sym- 
phony Concerto Aria Competi- 
tion. She has performed with the 
Natchitoches-Northwestern Sym- 
phony Orchestra, the Rapides 
Symphony Orchestra and the 
Monroe Symphony Orchestra. 

"I think I am continuing to 
improve as an artist," she said. "I 
am able to better understand mu- 
sic and different ways to interpret 
and perform music." 

Kim studies with Assistant 
Professor of Piano Dr. Francis 
Yang. Erik Eklund of Ruston, 
who studies with Yang won the 
high school division of the com- 
petition. 

Two NSU graduate students, 
Angelica Sanchez and Alonso 
Saavedra Coles were also in the 
Young Artists competition. 




Courtesy of News Bureau 

Northwestern State student MinJeong Kim advances to regional competition in January. 



I Parkway Cinema 


1011 


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i "The Twilight Saga 


i Breaking Dawn Pt. 2" 




Rated PG-13 


i 4:10 ( 


.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 




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1 Kntt 



Beautifying your exterior: the importance of skincare 




During my Thanksgiving 
travels 
I made 
it a point to be 
observant of the 
latest and greatest 
merchandise. 
The most Jacob Labutka 
wondrous of Style Columnist 
these obser- 
vations occurred when I found 
skin heaven in the new Ulta 
store in Lafayette. For those of 
you who are not aware, Ulta 
it is a store similar to Sephora 
that sells makeup and skin care 
products. 

I could happily discuss their 
products and services or the 
"Buy 2, Get 2 Free" sale on 
their store-brand items, but for 
the purpose of this article Ulta 
serves as my muse. The variety 
of skin care products at stores 
like Ulta exist for a variety of 
skin types. Case in point, it's 
not a terrible idea to adopt a 
skin care regimen or alter your 
current one regardless of your 
complexion. 

Some of us have the op- 
posite of perfect skin and have 
to perform daily skin care 
rituals. There are others who 



have perfect skin and still look 
amazing without a drop or speck 
of foundation (I salute you but 
you should know that you are 
envied). 

However, there will come 
a time when youthful skin that 
doesn't need a regimen will 
droop like Joan Walters if she 
would have never met a plas- 
tic surgeon. Even if you have 
perfect skin now, using skin 
care products will increase the 
longevity of your healthy skin so 
that getting old doesn't have to 
be dreary. 

First off, if you do not have 
one already, it would be wise 
to invest in a facial cleanser. 
After a long day of classes and 
shenanigans there are likely to 
be particles of dust, dirt and oil 
that have accumulated over your 
pores. 

Also, you really won't be 
the same person in the next few 
years, biologically that is. Some 
of your body's cells die every 
day and are replaced by new 
ones. I don't know about you, 
but I don't like the idea of dead 
skin cells clinging to my skin 
(note that exfoliating too much 




Submitted Photo 



A variety of skin care products are available to help maintain healthy, smooth skin. 



will dry out your face). 

There is something else your 
skin nourishes for: moisture. 
Even if you have oily skin you 
should still use a moisturizer 
(take note of oil-free products). 
One day your skin will not 
be naturally firm and start to 
wrinkle; a good moisturizer will 
help extend the life of youthful 



skin. 

These are just a few of the 
many skin care products out 
there (others include toner, spot 
treatment, softener, masks and 
the list goes on). I hardly believe 
you should go and buy every 
skin care product that's available 
(It's a wonderful idea, but most 
of us actually have budgets). 



I am certainly no dermatolo- 
gist, but if you are new to the 
world of skin care you should 
consider adding a few things to 
your Christmas list this year. If 
you really want to treat yourself 
this Christmas you should find 
a skin bar and get a good facial 
(but t afs an entirely different 
story). 




Did You 
Know? 



Whether you enjoy it 
classically with jelly 
or eclectically with 
pickles as the New York 
Times recently featured, there are 
countless ways to enjoy peanut 
butter during National Peanut 
Butter Lovers Month! In fact, 
during November, Americans will 
celebrate by eating more than 65 
million pounds of peanut butter! 

Courtesy of 
Peanutbutterlovers. com 



Chocolate chunk peppermint cookies 



Courtesy of 
Chef-In- Training, com 

3/4 cup butter, softened 
3/4 cup brown sugar, packed 
1/4 cup sugar 

1 small package Devil's Food in- 
stant pudding mix, dry (you could 
also just use chocolate, too) 

2 eggs 

1 tsp. vanilla extract 

1 tsp. baking soda 

2 1/4 cups flour 

1 cup Andes Peppermint Crunch 
Baking Chips 

1 cup semi-sweet chocolate 
chunks (semi-sweet chocolate 
chips will work) 

DIRECTIONS: 

1 . Cream together butter and sugars. 

2. Beat in dry instant pudding mix. 

3. Add eggs and vanilla and beat un- 
til well incorporated. 

4. Add baking soda and flour and 
beat until well incorporated. 

5. Stir in Andes Peppermint Crunch 
baking chips and semi-sweet choco- 
late chunks. 

6. R0II into 1" balls and place on a 
greased baking sheet. 

7. Bake at 350 degrees F for 8-10 
minutes. I find 9 minutes to be the 
perfect number for my oven. 

8. Enjoy! 




Chocolate CHu 
'"Pudding Coo 





Photo by Josh Mitchell 



Fraternity crowns new Miss Black and Gold 



What young woman wouldn't dream of being crowned a queen or at least in this case Miss Black 
and Gold? On Nov. 14, the Theta Chi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. held their annual 
Miss Black and Gold Pageant. 

Senior Clarissa Morgan was crowned Miss Black and Gold. First runner-up, Miss Black, was 
sophomore Kyla Winey. The secondTunner-up, Miss Gold, was sophomore Titi Oden-Shobayo. 

Morgan wins a scholarship for the 2012-2013 school year and will serve alongside the chapter 
moving forward to accomplish various community service goals and initiatives. 





pinions 



Catherin^peverly 
Opinioiis Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
November 28. 2012 



Christmas Fest a headache for Natchitoches residents 



I Something that the citizens of 
Natchitoches push to the back 
of their minds each year is the 
Christmas festival. 

Where other towns put up a few 
lights around 
the city, 
Natchitoches 
shuts down its 
historic district 
and crowds 
hundreds of 
Catherine Beverly people 

Opinions Editor onto the 
banks 

of the Cane River Lake to watch 
fireworks and to make merry. 
Let it never be said that I am 




against making merry, as that's 
not the case at all. I'm against the 
Natchitoches Christmas festival 
for a bev y of reasons that are not 
related to people being happy. 

The first reason is probably the 
most common complaint in regards 
to Christmas Fest: traffic. 

The streets of Natchitoches 
are backed up, sometimes for 
30 minutes or more because of 
the festival on Front Street. The 
travelers are not likely to find this 
a challenge, since they are here on 
a short vacation to see Christmas 
lights, but the residents are stuck 
out in the cold. 

Excuse the extended metaphor 



I'm about to use, but I think it 
works in relation to Christmas Fest. 
The Christmas Fest celebration, 
otherwise known as "45 Days of 
Lights," is in many ways like the 
Cane River Lake. 

While Cane River Lake is pretty, 
and the story behind it is interesting, 
the lake is just a lake pretending to 
be a river. It may have been a river 
once, but it will never be again. 

My attitude toward Natchitoches 
has shifted over the years of my 
college career. In the beginning 
I was enamored with the brick 
walkways and fancy gardens on 
Front Street, but then I realized 
that living in Natchitoches is not 



so wonderful. It's actually a little 
annoying for the average college 
student. 

Christmas Fest is a perfect 
example of the single-mindedness 
of Natchitoches' tourist board. 
While the residents of this city are 
driving around on broken roads, 
Natchitoches' leaders roll out the 
proverbial red carpet for travelers. 
Instead of providing benefits for 
everyone in Natchitoches, the 
Christmas Fest is aimed at tourists 
with a pocketful of cash. 

For the rest of us, there are 
traffic jams on disintegrating streets 
and jacked up prices to stand on 
Front Street. 



I understand the importance 
of the tourist industry , I really do, 
but I do not understand shafting 
the people who provide you with a 
year-round income. 

Where others cities serve the 
needs of the citizens (by building 
an "Izzo's Illegal Burrito"), 
Natchitoches is constantly standing 
in the way of incoming businesses 
to preserve the historic atmosphere 
of Front Street and Second Street. 

Maybe it sounds strange, but 
my Christmas wish is going to be 
for good roads and cheap dining 
extblishments. 



We need writers! 

Our newspaper 
needs stories written 
by students. Come 
by our office, 227 Ky- 
ser, if you would like 
to join. 

Meetings every Mon- 
day at 6:50 p.m. We 

hope to hear from 

you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



CjoocCfuctz on yourjinafs 
ana have a safe £>realtl 

- Current Sauce staff 





'I— — 




Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 


^^jrrent 


Chris Degeyter 

Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 




Jessica Blow 


Adviser 


Kirstie White 


Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 


Copy Editor 


JC Bryant 


News Editor 


Jacob Labutka 


Social Media 


Alexis Reliford 


Lifestyle Columnist 


Camille Mosley 


Life Editor 


Andrea Nederostova 


Freshman Scholar 


Jimmie Walker 


Sauce Reporter 


Taylor Furr 


Sports Editor 


Contessa Wills 


Delivery Personnel 


Catherine Beverly 


Sauce Reporter 


Office phone 


Opinions Editor 


Damian Glover 
Sauce Reporter 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 


318-357-5456 







Winter 
begins 

December21 



© 2012 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. 



/ PAP, CAhi tfCA) tWMEP 




MY H&H TABLCT W3NT <^HQ\ 
WITH MY L-APTCRi. j 




The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 

^ . 





PORTS 



Jimmie W alker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
November 28, 2012 




Chris Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 



The yellow 
flag dilemma 

As one who would have called 
himself an adamant fan of 
football before this season, 
the work of the officials in the NFL 
this season is absolutely appalling. 
1 am not even 

referring to the VffiMmH 

replacement 
referee prob- 
lems in the be- 
ginning of the 
season specifi- 
cally, although 
that seemed to 
be the trig- 
ger for all 
officiating to 
go down the 
toilet. 

Linemen are getting away with 
more facemask penalties than ever. 
Horse-collar tackles are nearly the 
only thing being used to take down a 
running back. Pass interference, of- 
fensive and defensive, are suddenly 
both completely arbitrary rulings. 
It's to the point where NFL games 
should air on Comedy Central in- 
stead of ESPN. 

The problem is caused by the sub- 
jective nature of humans mixed with 
the fast-paced action of the game 
itself. This is where things need to 
be fixed. Yellow flags from referees 
should not automatically be penal- 
ties, but instead should let the replay 
booth-with the ability to slow down 
the action and see multiple angles- 
judge the play and if there was a rule 
infraction or not. 

If penalties were reviewed, a play- 
er could not be penalized wrongfully 
because one official saw something 
from a bad angle. That fixes half the 
problem. 

The head coaches for both teams 
should be able to challenge any and 
all penalties, or lack of penalties. 
These head coaches should also be 
able to challenge any aspect of a 
ruling on the field, rather than have 
their options limited. 

If a game-changing call on the 
field is horribly wrong, the coaches 
should be able to fix it. That is the 
purpose of challenge flags. But sev- 
en or eight times out of 1 0, a coach's 
options are so limited that he simply 
has no say in the matter. His team 
loses because of a stupid human er- 
ror outside of his control. 

This season of football is an ab- 
solute absurdity, and even a change 
going into the postseason will not 
correct this mistake. This season is 
basically inconsequential. The NFL 
needs to fix the entire concept of 
officiating if it wants to fit any defi- 
nition of the word integrity, which 
most sports aim to fit. 

Referees have the ability to com- 
pletely change the outcome of a 
game with their officiating. This is 
perfectly exemplified by the Pack- 
ers at Seahawks game during week 
three. One call completely shows ev- 
ery aspect of problems with officiat- 
ing the way it is today. 

There are arbitrary rules for 
whether pass interference is called 
or not called. The difference be- 
tween touchdowns and interceptions 
is based on the subjectivity of what 
each official sees. Head coaches 
have limited power and are unable 
to challenge who caught the ball-be- 
cause that cannot be reviewed at all 
for some reason- are unable to chal- 
lenge within the last two minutes 
of play or challenge an aspect of a 



For complete story, 
visit nsucurrentsauce.com 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Demon setter Keelie Arneson digs an attack. The team finished the season with an overall record of 20-13, 12-7 in conference. 

Lady Demons drop final two matches of 2012 



Kellie O'Brien 

Sauce Reporter 

Stacey DiFrancesco and Keelie 
Arneson led the Northwest- 
em State volleyball team once 
again on Friday afternoon but their 
efforts fell short as the Lady Demons 
dropped their final two matches of 
the season against No. 54 Tulsa and 
North Dakota State. 

The Lady Demons end their re- 
cord-breaking season 20-13 overall 
and 12-7 against Southland Con- 
ference opponents while Tulsa im- 
proves to 25-9 and NDSU moves to 
13-17. 

NSUfell 25-18, 25-15, 25-14 to 
Tulsa in its' first match of the day. 
Stacey DiFrancesco racked up a 
team-high 12 kills against TU and 
Keelie Arneson dug up 1 attacks. 

The first set against TU started out 
competitive with three ties early on. 



A kill by Tyler Henderson sparked a 
4-0 run for the Golden Hurricanes to 
put the score at 7-3. 

The Lady Demons fought back, 
putting up three unanswered points 
of their own to come within two 
points at the 1 1-9 mark. 
Tulsa pulled away after a DiFran- 
cesco attack error led to another 3-0 
run to put the score at 18-11. NSU 
was unable to recover, dropping the 
first set 25-18. 

The second set was more of the 
same as NSU kept it close through 
the first 1 points. A service error by 
Kelly Jimenez ignited a 1 2-4 streak 
for the Golden Hurricanes to give 
TU a 22-13 lead. 

The Lady Demons could not gain 
momentum as they fell 25-15. 
Tulsa wasted no time in the third set, 
completing a 9-1 run to put the score 
at 18-7. NSU could not close the 
deficit, falling 25-14. 



The Lady Demons took one set off 
of NDSU in their second match of 
the day before dropping the match 
25-21,20-25, 25-22, 25-20. 

Caiti O'Connell led NSU against 
the Bison, landing 17 kills, while 
Arneson collected an astonishing 33 
digs. 

DiFrancesco also had an impressive 
match, recording her 14th double- 
double of the year with 15 kills and 
1 5 digs. 

The first set was the most com- 
petitive of the four, totaling nine ties 
and six lead changes. The Bison led 
early on until a 4-1 streak gave NSU 
the lead at the 8-7 mark. 

The Lady Demons held onto their 
lead until an O'Connell attack error 
allowed NDSU to take over as the 
scoreboard read 18-17. 

NSU could not hold on as the 
Bison closed the set out on a 4-0 run, 
winning 25-21. 



The Lady Demons came out hot 
in the second set. gaining a 10-1 ad- 
vantage. NDSU slowly fought its' 
way back into the game, trimming 
the deficit to three points at the 23- 
20 mark. 

NSU was able to regain its' mo- 
mentum in the end, taking the set 
25-22. 

The third set was competitive in the 
beginning until the Bison complet- 
ed a 6-1 streak to go up 15-9. The 
Lady Demons fought back, scoring 
five unanswered points, to bring the 
score to 22-21, in NDSU's favor, but 
fell short as the Bison won 25-22. 

The final set was more of the 
same as NSU led early on. A series 
of NDSU 3-0 runs gave the Bison 
the advantage and the Lady Demons 
were unable to answer, falling 25-20. 

NSU volleyball returns to action 
in the spring with a series of exhibi- 
tion matches. 



NSU will not renew contract of football coach Bradley Dale Peveto 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

Northwestern State . will not 
renew the contract of head 
football coach Bradley Dale 
Peveto, said athletics director Greg 
Burke on Monday, after the Demons 
posted only 14 wins in Peveto's four 
seasons as head coach. 

Burke praised Peveto's impact 
in many respects, but said an over- 
all 14-30 record and a 9-19 mark in 
Southland Conference play triggered 
the decision to seek a new head 
coach. Peveto's teams went 0-11, 
the school's first winless season, in 
2009, then 5-6 in 20 1 and 20 1 1 , and 
4-7 in the just-completed season. 

"Bradley Dale has moved the De- 
mon football program forward in 
many areas - academics, commu- 
nity relations, fund raising, to name 
a few -- but on-field success has not 
been at a level for which anybody 
associated with the program had 
hoped." said Burke. 

In 2010, the Demons played for 
a share of the Southland Conference 
championship in the season finale 
but were beaten by Stephen F. Austin 
and finished 4-3 in the league, their 
only winning conference record un- 
der Peveto. 

"Going in a different direction with 
our head coaching position is not 
an easy decision," said Burke, "be- 
cause Bradley Dale has represented 
NSU in such a positive fashion and 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Bradley Peveto was head coach of the football team for four 
years. He went 0-11 his first season and finished with a record 
of 14-30. 



has genuinely had the best interest of 
our football student-athletes in mind 
on a daily basis. 

"He has developed close and, in 
some cases, renewed long-lasting 
relationships in the community, as 
well as with former players and with 
countless alumni. He really loves 
this university and this community 
and dedicated himself with unlim- 
ited energy to bettering the fortunes 
of Demon football." said Burke. 

"I know that I speak on behalf 
of coaches and staff in the athletic 
department, many who have devel- 



oped close relationships with Brad- 
ley Dale, in wishing him the best of 
luck in moving forward." 

Peveto was the Demons' defen- 
sive coordinator under legendary 
coach Sam Goodwin in 1996-98, 
helping Northwestern win the 1997 
and 1998 Southland championships 
and make playoff appearances both 
seasons, including advancing to the 
FCS semifinals in 1998. 

He was hired as head coach after 
four seasons on the LSU staff under 
Les Miles, including the 2007 BCS 
national championship campaign. 



"I'm highly disappointed, to be 
honest, but I want to say that I have 
loved and cherished the four years 
I've spent, along with this coaching 
staff, at Northwestern State," said 
Peveto. "The community's been in- 
credible. It's a great university that 
I dearly love. The players have been 
tremendous, the alumni have been 
wonderful, and it's been a fun ride. 
I'm going to cherish the great mem- 
ories of being at Northwestern State 
as the head football coach. 

"It happens. At the end of the day, 
I felt like we did everything right, 
but we didn't win enough games in 
four years to make Northwestern 
State happy. When that happens, this 
is the outcome. This is the decision 
that's been made, and we'll look it 
in the eyes as a staff and a team. I 
will be here personally when the 
kids get back (from Thanksgiving 
break) to meet with them and make 
sure they're doing the right things," 
he said. 

"I've preached responsibility and 
accountability to these players since 
they got here, and now I have a re- 
sponsibility and accountability to 
them. I'm going to be sure they do 
what they're supposed to do aca- 
demically, they stay the course in 
the weight room, to ensure they do 



For complete story, 
visit nsudemons.com 




Of M 



ALL FOOT>, 

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lo9 South Dr . 
Natchitoches, LA 






Dynomite: 
Are you team 
Manziel or 
team Te'o? 

There is less than a week left 
in the Heisman Trophy race, 
and the college football world 
couldn't be more polarized. Some 
college 
football fans 
are screaming 
for Texas A 
&M's fresh- 
man quarter- 
back Johnny 
"Football" 
Manziel, 

and some are Jimmie Walker 

screaming for Editor-in-Chief 
Notre Dame's 

senior linebacker Manti Te'o. 

Some would say the debate is 
like a presidential election, but I 
think it's more like the Team Jacob 
versus Team Edward argument 
between two teenage girls. 

All I hear is that Te'o can't be 
the Heisman because he plays de- 
fense, or Manziel can't be it because 
he's a freshman in a two- loss team. 

Johnny Football and Te'o are 
amazing football players and wor- 
thy of many awards for their play 
this season. 

I'm starting to notice that people 
are beginning to ride the wave of 
Johnny Football because he is the 
guy with the cool nickname. He's 
the quarterback. He's the freshman. 
He beat Alabama. Those points are 
the driv ing force behind most of his 
supporters. 

If you're more into the numbers, 
Manziel boasts an impressive stat 
sheet. He threw for more than 3,000 
yards while finding the end zone 
through the air 24 times. 

He would probably be Edward. 

Te'o supporters argue that he 
is the best player on the only bowl 
eligible unbeaten team. That is very 
convincing statement is convincing. 

One of Te'o's biggest support- 
ers is his head coach, Brian Kelly. 
Kelly stated that Te'o deserves the 
Heisman and if he doesn't win, the 
award should be an offensive player 
only award. 

Offensive players have won the 
Heisman every year since 1997 
when Charles Woodson won. Wood- 
son was a defensive back that also 
returned punts for Michigan. 
Te'o is the backbone of the team 
that has been forgotten in the col- 
lege football world and will com- 
pete for the National Championship 
against Alabama or Georgia. 

Many people think this is the 
only reason Te'o is in the race. 

He doesn"t hav e the numbers to 
stand toe-to-toe with Johnny Foot- 
ball, but his presence on the field 
reshaped an entire football program. 
Te'o has six interceptions and over 
100 tackles. 

Both candidates deserve to win 
the Heisman, but there can only be 
one winner in this race. 

I think Te'o should win the Heis- 
man because he is a player that has 
been building his trophy resume for 
the entire season. 

Johnny Football has just become 
a household name in the recent 
weeks. 

To me, the Heisman Trophy is 
more than s statistical award. I think 
a player's integrity and how he 
gets the entire team involved has to 
come into play. 

Te'o has embodied that aspect of 
the Heisman Trophy. 




The 




u r rent 





Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, January 23, 2013 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦Volume 98: Issue 12 



Caspari construction approaching completion 



Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

The S3. 56 million program 
to reconstruct Caspari 
Hall will house several of 
the offices including the 
office of the Randall J. Webb, 
NSU President. The building will 
also include the offices of Internal 
Auditor and Institutional Research, 
Provost Lisa Abney and Vice Pro- 
vost Steve Horton 

The newly renovated hall will 
house an office for university plan- 
ning which will be led by director 
of the services, Veronica Bisco. 
The job of university planning is to 
aid and assist in any accreditation 
that takes place on campus. The 
office will also conduct assess- 
ments for graduating students and 
also produce advising surveys to 
students during and at the end of 
the semester. 

Besides holding offices for the 
university authority, Caspari Hall 
will also serve as the new home for 
the Dean of liberal arts and gradu- 
ate studies. 

The new location of graduate 
will allow access to more 
information in regarding the 
student's field of study. It will also 
provide an easier access to the new 
Student Services Building becomes 
of its adjacent side by side loca- 



tion. 

Elizabeth Champagne, sopho- 
more early childhood education 
major, is elated about the new 
move and future plans for Caspari 
Hall. 

"The new reconstruction of the 
hall and also the move of the of- 
fices is not only benefiting present 
and future students, but Caspari 
also will serve as an inviting area to 
tourist and future graduate students 
such as myself because of its new 
appealing architecture," Cham- 
pagne said. 

Before the reconstruction 
process began in the summer, the 
historic property was once home to 
many former students and several 
offices such as student services and 
continuing education. 

The hall started out as a two- 
story dormitory for male students, 
was transformed into a office for 
continuing education and then was 
reverted back to a dormitory. Now 
the building will have a new level 
added on that will provide more 
room for future plans. 

Dolores Cormier-Zenon, former 
masters of education in educational 
technology graduate student of the 
university, believes that the new 
project will have many opportuni- 
ties. 

"Caspari Hall will not only 
serve as just a building but as a 




Photo by News Bureau 

The $3 million dollar project will house a number of offices that were once in Rpy Hall. It's scheduled for completion this spring. 



home, a meeting ground or a center 
location to past, present and future 
students who may come back 
to acquire more certifications or 
degrees," 



Zenon said. 

The president's office is cur- 
rently located in the new CAPA 
building below Hanchey Art Gal- 
lery. The office of the provost, vice 



provost, dean of liberal arts and 
graduate studies are located in Roy 
Hall next to the WRAC. 

The internal auditor and uni- 
versity research are also located in 



Roy Hall. Future plans for 
Roy Hall have not been made yet 
and will be determined at a future 
date. Completion of this year-long 
project is scheduled for this spring. 



Art teacher uses technology to help fund project 

IffiiiiifiK I 



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- - a • • * ■ 



Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 



i**ilwt»«« of Ne* Digua* Vtcten Artwork 




M: 



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18 



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Submitted Photo 

DeFord has 18 days left to reach his target amount of $5,000 to fund his digital art project. 



■ atthew DeFord, associate 
professor of art, is off to 

■ the Internet in hopes of 
funding his new project by using the 
website Kickstarter.com to help get 
his newest project into art galleries. 

DeFord has had his works 
presented in galleries before but 
this is a special case. "I've recently 
gone into video art, so exhibiting 
the art is very difficult because of 
the screens," DeFord said. DeFord 
is seeking $5,000 for television 
screens to showcase his new art. 

DeFord is using Kickstarter to 
raise the money. Kickstarter is a 
website that allows a person to post 
their idea or project and accept do- 
nations within an allotted time. To 
increase incentive, most kickstarters 
offer rewards for different donation 



amounts. 

"Three buttons costs $10 and 
a full kickset of 10 costs $25," 
DeFord said. 

"More buttons get you a DVD 
and then acknowledgments. At 500 
buttons you get a personal piece of 
video art. At a 1 ,000 you get a one 
of a kind video piece, framed." 

DeFord found Kickstarter 
through one of his students last year 
and loved the idea. 
"A wonderful grassroots way of 
funding projects to keep corporate 
out of it", he said. 

DeFord intends to advise the 
platform to his students and have 
them use it to fund their projects. 

DeFord has been doing video 
art since 201 1 . He was reminded of 
flipbooks he made as a child. 

"I went onto YouTube and I 
found videos of geese flying and 
broke the frames down. It got me 



involved in youtube imagery. I 
moved it from the flip book to vid- 
eo. I started getting into iMovie and 
started creating videos with imagery 
and sound solely from YouTube." 

DeFord has his own website, 
mattdeford.com, where some of his 
video art can be found. 

Future plans for DeFord include 
researching "app art," applications 
for tablets that enable a person to 
interact with art. He also wants to' 
continue submitting arts to exhibits 
and eventually give away or auction 
off his art. 

"I'm an exhibiting artist," De- 
Ford said. "I find that when they're 
storage they are dead. I want them 
to be alive." 

Anyone who wishes to help De- 
Ford can simply head to Kickstarter. 
com and search Matt DeFord. The 
kickstarter ends on Feb. 10. 



Mayor Lee Posey considers new improvements for Natchitoches 



Andrea Nerodostova 

Sauce Reporter 

Have you ever driven in 
Natchitoches and seen a 
cyclist who was confused 
as to whether to cycle on the road 
and slow down the traffic or cycle 
on the pavement and threaten the 
pedestrians? 

This should not be an issue any 
longer as Mayor Lee Posey and 
many of the city department heads 
are having an interest in adding bi- 
cycle lanes on Natchitoches roads. 

As Natchitoches is a smaller 
town, many NSU students and 
Natchitoches residents prefer using 
bicycles to get to their destinations. 
First, using a bicycle saves mon- 



ey for gas. Second, cycling saves 
the environment; Third, cycling is 
a great exercise that keeps people 
fit. The city of Natchitoches desires 
to become a more bicycle friendly 
community for many reasons. 

"We want for our residents to be 
able to cycle safely," Lisa Cooley of 
Programming and Promotions of the 
Main Street, said. 

"There are many health benefits 
of bicycling," Cooley said. "The 
issue of quality of life also comes 
up when looking at bike lanes. The 
more options you offer to your resi- 
dents to maintain healthy lifestyles, 
the better the quality of life in a city. 
Bike lanes also influence economic 
development. When businesses look 
to relocate, they look for a 'quality 



of place.'" 

Conway, a city in Arkansas, which 
is a certified 'Bicycle Friendly Com- 
munity,' has inspired Natchitoches 
by its economic development that 
partially resulted from providing 
bike lines to its residents. The City 
of Natchitoches hosted a meeting 
on Jan. 15 where adding bike lanes 
and trails on Natchitoches roads was 
discussed. The meeting was open to 
public. 

"We hosted a meeting to gauge the 
community's interest in becoming 
a more bicycle-friendly community 
and had an overwhelming response," 
Cooley said. "It 's obvious that many 
residents of Natchitoches are in fa- 
vor of this endeavor." 

Natchitoches residents and also 



NSU students who can't afford ve- 
hicles are in favor of this project. 

"The only way how I can get to 
the places I need is on my bicycle," 
Tatiana Larina, hospitality manage- 
ment and tourism major, said. "First, 
I cannot afford car, and second. I 
really love cycling. I feel very con- 
fident when I ride my bicycle on 
the road but I don't trust the driv- 
ers. Therefore, I prefer riding on the 
pavement. 

Adding the bike lanes will make 
me feel safer, and I will be able to 
enjoy riding more instead of worry- 
ing who is behind me." 
With the construction and repaving 




For the rest of this story, check 
out wwvv'.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Photo by Andrea Nedorostova 
NSU sophomore Tatiana Larina rides her bike daily 
around the city. Her bike is her only transportation. 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

70743° 



Thursday 

72755° 



Friday 

64737° 



Saturday 

54743° 



Sunday 

61752° 



Monday 

61751° 



Tuesday 

72756° 







Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
January 23, 2013 



Collier sings her way into LOB crown 



Jessica Blow 

Staff Writer 

Overwhelmed with a mix- 
ture of nervousness and 
excitement, eight NSU 
ladies patiently awaited the 
announcement of the 55th Annu- 
alMiss Northwestern Lady of the 
Bracelet. 

Breanna Collier of Bossier 
City was crowned the new face of 
NSU. 

The Miss Northwestern Lady 
of the Bracelet pageant, often 
referred to as LOB, is a scholar- 
ship pageant that also serves as a 
preliminary for the Miss Louisi- 
ana pageant. The Student Activi- 
ties Board sponsors the program 
and was hosted this year by Miss 
Louisiana 2012, Lauren Vizza. 

The LOB pageant began in 
1958 when Kahne Dipola was 
crowned the first LOB. She 
received a gold bracelet to wear 
the following year to represent 
the university in public. Over 
the years, the bracelet has been 
passed down to each holder of the 
title. 

The sophomore musical theatre 
major was awarded over $5,000 
in scholarships and prizes. In 
addition to being crowned LOB, 
Collier also won the Liz Carroll 
People's Choice Award, as voted 



on by members of the audience 
and the talent portion of the com- 
petition. 

Kyla Winey of Lafayette was 
first runner-up. Alyson Hum- 
phrey of Bossier City was second 
runner-up, and Bailee Cartwright 
of Holdenville, Okla., was third 
runner-up. 

Collier is a member of the De- 
mon Dazzlers dance line, Phi Mu 
Fraternity, NSU Glee Club and 
the Student Theatre Organization. 

Along with the other contes- 
tants Collier had to perform in 
an opening act dance and intro- 
duction, as well as compete in 
swimsuit, evening gown talent 
and on-stage question portions. 

Collier's talent was singing, 
and she sang "Don't Rain on My 
Parade" by Barbra Streisand. 

"Pageants can be scary at 
first," Collier explained. 

Although, according to Collier, 
once the music plays and the au- 
dience cheers, the stage becomes 
her second home. 

Collier, no stranger to the 
stage, has competed in pageants 
since she was six-years-old. As a 
child, Collier has lived in many 
states, but according to her, this 
has only strengthened her commu- 
nication skills and made her more 
outgoing-little things that help 
her with competing in pageants. 



Although, this pageant was 
different, because this 
was the first time 
she won a title. 

According to 
Collier, she was 
overwhelmed as her 
name was called 
as the winner of 
LOB. 

Prior to LOB. 
Collier competed 
in Alpha Phi 
Alpha Frater- 
nity's annual 
Miss Black 
and Gold 
Pageant. 
She took 
this pageant 
as prepara- 
tion for LOB along 
with eating healthy 
and exercising. Ac- 
cording to Collier, 
the preparations 
became difficult at 
times because she 
was readjusting to 
attending school. 

"The practices 
were fun," Collier 
said. "They are 
not as competitive 
as people would 
think." 

According to Collier, the 




pageant allowed her to make 
new friends and learn from 
her competition. 
Collier stayed motivated 
by her family, the rewards, 
being NSU's representative 

at Miss Louisiana and a 
1 chance to compete in 

Miss Louisiana. She will 
I go on to compete in June 
J at the Miss Louisiana 
Pageant held in Monroe. 
She will start her prepara- 
tions in Feb., by getting a 
coach to perfect her model- 
ing, improve her talent 
and also sharpen her 
knowledge in Louisiana 
| history. 

"It's a dream come 
true to say I am compet- 
ing in Miss Louisiana," 
Collier said. 

According to Collier 
it's something she has 
always wanting to 
do, as she watched 
pageants like Miss 
Louisiana as a child. 
"The best part of 
winning is getting 
chance to repre- 
sent my peers and 
Northwestern as a 
whole, see new 
doors opening and 
meeting new people," Col- 
lier said. 




Photo By Gary Hardamon 



Breanna Collier, the 2013 Miss Northwestern Lady of the 
Bracelet, is crowned by 2012 LOB, Tori Thompson. 



Student studies north of the Mason-Dixon line 




It's cer- 
tainly not the 
glamorous 
Isle of Man- 
hattan, but it's 
hardly a South- 
ern small Jacob Labutka 
town known Style Columnist 
for chasing 

chickens down the road during 
Mardi Gras either. For the next 
few months I'll be writing to you 
from Cleveland, Ohio, where I am 
attending Cleveland State Univer- 
sity through the National Student 
Exchange program. 

The first few days here certainly 
brought about the realization that 
Toto is not in Louisiana anymore. 
Any Southern-raised individual 
can tell that the Mason-Dixon line 
has been crossed just by walking 
into a grocery store. It's one thing 
to know that brands like Blue Bell 
and Community Coffee are South- 
ern, but it's another thing to walk 
into a grocery store after 20 years 
and suddenly not see them. 

However, the city certainly has 
its benefits. I live in the campus 
area, and anytime I need to go to 
the heart of downtown I take the 
rapid transit bus on the infamous 
Euclid Ave. 

Positive characteristics of 
Cleveland like rapid public transit 
were unknown to me hidden 
beneath talk of urban decline and 
the rivalry between the Steelers 
and Browns. For example, I had 
no idea before I moved here that 
Cleveland houses the Playhouse 




Photo by Jacob Labutka 

Feature writer Jacob Labutka is studying in Cleveland, Ohio, this semester as part of the National Student 
Exchange. He took this picture from the Lake Erie Pier. 



Square Theatre District whose size 
is second only to that of New York. 

This city did meet many chal- 
lenges when the Rust Belt declined 
in the 1970s, but Cleveland has 
done well revitalizing itself. There 
are eco-friendly urban initiatives 
that are creatively making green 
space and a city once known for 
a lack of food culture now has a 
wide variety of cuisine. 

So far, most of what I have 
eaten seems bland compared to 
spicy Louisiana food, especially 
when something that's "spicy" 
up here is the equivalent of mild 
1 200 miles to the south. However, 
I have hardly tried everything up 
here yet, and will not give up on 
finding the best of the spicy and 
flavorful. 



It seems that no matter where 
I travel people always ask me all 
sorts of questions. Of course the 
classic, "How tall are you?" is still 
asked when people find themselves 
standing in front of the 6' 7" giant 
that is me. However, when people 
realize that I'm from Louisiana 
they often ask how I like the cold. 

A few wonder how I could 
survive the ice of winter wonder- 
land after being plunged here from 
the fires of the deep south. To that 
I say it's all about being prepared. 
All you need to survive is the right 
accessories, a warm coat and win- 
ter leggings 

What is more true than anything 
else is how much I miss the won- 
derful aspects about my life back 
home (shout out to my Scholars' 



peeps!). Going away from where 
we're from reminds us of the parts 
of our lives that are most valuable. 
We're reminded of what has made 
us the people we are. 

It's strange not having my best 
friends around me every day. But 
the friends I have made and the 
education I have received has 
given me the confidence to start 
anew. 

People asked me before I left 
if I felt nervous about my reloca- 
tion and each time I answered with 
a resolute no. There are so many 
opportunities out there for all of us 
and despite whatever has happened 
in our lives thus far, we're all 
searching for new beginnings. 




/ 1 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

The Last Stand" 

Rated ? 
4:10 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

A Haunted House" 

Rated R 
4:20 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 



Texas Chainsaw 3D' 

Rated R 
3.30 p.m. 



jer Squad' 1 

ated R 

50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 




1 9 DAYS 






pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
January 23, 2013 



'Happy Readers': Is America next? 



McDonald's has recently 
revealed that the "Happy 
Meal" toy children are so 
fond of will be replaced 
with a book. While this 
may seem like a lucrative 
deal, as books are far more 
valuable a resource to 
receive as a add-on item 
at a fast-food restaurant, 
the only draw back is 
that the new feature will 
only be available in the 
United Kingdom for the 
foreseeable future. 

While McDonald's has faced 
multiple lawsuits for its distribution 



of Happy Meal toys, mostly by 
those who claim the toys are 
persuading children to want fast 
food, the big question 
whether or not the new- 
shift to books will be 
successful. 

Their new campaign 
comes from research 
from British National 

Literacy Trust after it 
Catherine Beverly was dlscovered tnat; m 

Opinions Editor the United Kingdoni) 

30 percent of children 
don't own any books. There are 
articles written using these statistics 
from over two years ago. 




Not only will "Happy Readers" 
hopefully help lower these numbers, 
it will also make McDonald's the 
largest children's book distributor in 
the United Kingdom. 

While there is no comparable 
information available for the United 
States, the website FirstBook.com 
compiled some information on 
the availability of books for low- 
income areas. 

According to this site, 80 percent 
of programs and pre-schools serving 
children in don't own any books. 
This leads 83 percent of low-income 
fourth graders to earn grades of 
"Below Proficient" in reading. 



Despite this data and the 
knowledge that many low and 
middle-income families are likely 
to eat out at fast food restaurants, 
as stated in a press release from 
UC Davis, McDonald's has shown 
no inclination to start the "Happy 
Readers Program in the United 
States. 

If the test run in Britain goes 
well, perhaps Americans will start 
seeing books in their Happy Meals. 
While this will not decrease the 
unhealthiness of the meal, it would 
be better than the prerequisite 
low-priced toys and baubles that 
children have received for years. 



Organizations like "First Book" 
truly believe that giving a child a 
book greatly increases the chances 
of that child being more literate in 
the future. If our communities' pre- 
schools and daycare centers cannot 
provide the necessary material for 
children to foster a love of reading, 
it must be regulated to businesses 
like McDonald's. 

After we make this concession, 
the next step is to realize that if the 
education of our children has fallen 
into the hands of corporations, then 
our state and local government is 
obviously not fulfilling its duties. 



We need writers! 

Our newspaper 
needs stories written 
by students. Come 
by our office, 227 Ky- 
ser, if you would like 
to join. 

Meetings every Mon- 
day at 4:00 p.m. We 

hope to hear from 
you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



Take the stairs I 



Ever since the beginning of 
school, I have been battling 
a very nasty and determined 
plantar's wart. If one does not know 
about a plantar's wart, it is a very 
irritating wart that grows 
on the bottom of one's foot. 
It is incredibly painful and 
incredibly hard to get rid of. 

I do not know how one 
gets these little boogers, but 
I managed to get one. After 
finally getting the wart 
cut out, which the doctor 
said was huge even for 
that kind of wart, the devilish fiend 
came back with a vengeance. 

About a month and a half later, 
I went back to the doctor because 
I had a feeling that the thing was 
coming back. Turns out, I now had 
three to four warts now. Frustrated, 
I listened to the options of how 
to rid myself of these brutes, and 
surgery was the only option. 

After my surgery, I was not 
allowed to walk or stand for long 
periods of time-all of that jazz. I 
started to feel better and was able 
to go to school. I walk extremely 
slowly, and I have to take the 
elevators. I despise taking the 
elevators here for multiple reasons. 

Reason number one is that 
it is slow, and I am a fast-paced, 
determined individual. I would 
rather take the stairs than have the 
wait for an elevator. Reason number 
two is that the elevator is for the 
handicapped and inhibited. 

Reason number three is that 
there are always at least six able- 
bodied people waiting for this 




Camille Mosley 

Freshman Scholar 



slow elevator. Seriously? These 
people are too lazy to take the 
stairs? These people could use the 
exercise anyways. 

I am the not healthiest person, 
either, but I at least 
respect the people who 
need the elevator. 
On Monday I was waiting 
on the elevator. I was on 
the third floor, so there 
was really no hope that 
I could make it down 
the stairs. When the 
elevator finally arrived, 
there were at least seven people in 
the elevator. 

There was only one crippled 
person on crutches. A guy whom I 
was talking to got on the elevator 
before I could and then, lo and 
behold, there was no more room 
for me. I had to wait for yet 
another elevator. I was fuming. 
I'm not even supposed to be on 
my foot for very long! 

Is there something wrong with 
some people that feel the need to 
ride on the freaking elevator and 
make the people who actually 
need the elevator wait? Seriously? 
It's a matter of respect. Just take 
the stairs! It is not that big of a 
deal! 

I really hope that there is a 
Zombie Apocalypse one day and 
these elevator-waiting people 
experience what it's like to 
actually use their legs and not wait 
for things to be handed to them. 
The people who use the stairs, 
including myself, will be in much 
better shape because of this. 



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The- 




u rrent 

auce 



Jimmie Walker 


Andrea Nederostova 


Editor-in-Chief 


Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 


Contessa Wills 


Adviser 


Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 


Damian Glover 


News Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Alexis Reliford 


Chris Degeyter 


Life Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Jimmie Walker 


Jessica Blow 


Sports Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Catherine Beverly 


Linda Ahlskog 


Opinions Editor 


Social Media 


Kirstie White 


Camille Mosley 


Copy Editor 


Freshman Scholar 


Jacob Labutka 


Taylor Furr 


Lifestyle Columnist 


Delivery Personnel 



Office phone 
318-357-5456 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



8 



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boxing 
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permission 
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13 Vbkoof 
music 

14 By word of 
mouth 

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18 Fancy 
French 
cake 

20 Offer as an 
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22 $ dispenser 

23 Comic 
DeLwse 

24 Light buib 
measure 

27 Lengthwise 
and 

contiguous 

32 Hearty quaff 

33 "The Matrix" 
role 

34 "There's 

— in team" 

35 Huge 
39 Norms 

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39 GIs' 
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The Hobbit': An expected delight 
Rating: •• 



'O 



Annie Desoto-Buras 

Guest columnist 

There was widespread 
excitement among Tolkien 
fans when a film version 
of "The Hobbit" was announced, 
and that excitement continued right 
through the release date. 

The excitement was tempered, 
however, by some concern that the . 
movie might not do justice to the 
book. 

Happily, that concern was quite 
unfounded, since not only "The 
Hobbitt" book, but also elements 
of some of J. R. R. Tolkien's other 
works in that universe were utilized 
to create the kind of wonderful 
work that we have come to expect 
from the production team involved. 

"The Hobbit" tells the story of 
Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman), 
a quiet, home-loving hobbit who 
was content to sit at home reading 
and eating until Gandalf (Sir Ian 
McKellen) invited him on the 
adventure of a lifetime. 

Bilbo is selected to accompany 
a band of dwarves, led by Thorin 
Oakenshield (Richard Armitage), 
in a quest to reclaim their home 
mountain, which has been taken 
over by the dragon Smaug. 

Along the way they encounter 
some memorable and recognizable 
characters, including Azog the 
Denier, an ore with whom Thorin 



has a long-standing enmity; 
Radagast the Brown, a wizard who 
lives in the forest and is perhaps too 
fond of mushrooms; and some old 
friends like Galadriel, Elrond, and 
Sauruman, from "The Lord of the 
Rings." 

The cinematography is exactly 
what we are accustomed to from 
"The Lord of the Rings" movies, 
which is to say, spectacular. New 
Zealand is as gorgeous as ever in 
this film, and it truly is the perfect 
setting for Middle Earth. 

Watching the film in 3-D is a 
great experience, but if you're not 
willing to shell out the extra money, 
you won't suffer for only seeing the 
non-3-D version. 

Reading the book is also not 
required since the story sucks you 
in whether you're a long-time fan 
or you're just being introduced to 
the world of Middle Earth. You 
can expect to be left wanting more, 
however, since "The Hobbit" book 
is going to be split into multiple 
movies. 

In short, the acting is very good, 
the characters likeable, the story 
involving and the scenery beautiful. 
The worst part of "The Hobbit" is 
the knowledge that we have to wait 
until the end of the year for the next 
installment. So go to your local 
theater and pick up a ticket for "The 
Hobbit" today. 

Go. Watch. Enjoy. 



7* 6 




The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
January 23, 2013 



NSU 
outlasts 
SLU, 64-55 

Jimmie Walker 

Courtesy of Sports Info: 

Keisha Lee's second-straight 
career night with 23 points 
and efficient ball handling 
by the Northwestern State women's 
basketball team led to a 64-55 win 
over Southeastern Louisiana Satur- 
day in Southland Conference action. 

NSU (7-10, 3-4) turned the ball 
over only five times against the Lady- 
Lions (7-10, 0-6) and earned its first 
conference win streak in two sea- 
sons. 

Those five turnovers are the few- 
est in the Southland Conference this 
season, matched only by McNeese 
and Nicholls, and fewest for the 
Lady Demons in 111 games going 
back to the 2008-09 season. 

"We did not shoot the basketball 
well, but we only had five turnovers 
and that might be the most beauti- 
ful stat I've seen all year from this 
group," said first-year-co-head coach 
Brooke Stoehr. "I'm really proud of 
how they valued the basketball." 

The Lady Demons shot only 34 
percent, the lowest since conference 
play opened, but were able to keep 
the lead by taking care of the ball 
and only allowing four points off 
turnovers. Opponents averaged 17.9 
points off of turnovers going into the 
game. 

The Lady Demons sank 80 percent 
(20-25) of their free throws, register- 
ing the second-highest totals of at- 
tempts and makes this season. 
Northwestern State took control with 
a 17-2 run over almost nine minutes 
midway through the first half, eras- 
ing a quick 11-2 deficit. A layup be- 
fore the halftime buzzer by Jasmine 
Upchurch gave the Lady Demons 
their biggest first-half lead, 29-20, 
and their first halftime advantage in 
seven games and only the third of 
the season. 

The margin was as big as 1 3 af- 
terward. Southeastern scrapped back 
within 56-53 with 1:44 to go, but 
Upchurch sank two free throws 24 
seconds later and Janelle Perez made 
three of four in the next half-minute 
to make it 61-53 with 30 seconds 
left, securing the outcome. 
Lee bested her career mark for 
the second straight game with her 
23 points. She also had seven re- 
bounds, two steals, and one assist on 
the game. 

"Keisha might have been more 
tentative in the early part of the sea- 
son," said Stoehr. "She has gained 
some confidence, and she knows 
we've given her the green light to 
take some shots." 

Perez and Upchurch both scored 
in double-digits as well. Perez fin- 
ished with 18, three short of her 
career high, and Upchurch scored 
13 and grabbed nine boards, barely 
missing her third double-double on 
the season. 

"I think for a point guard of 
Janelle's size, she did a good job get- 
ting our team into the right look of- 
fensively," said Stoehr. "She valued 
the basketball and knocked down 
some big shots for us. 

"Jasmine (Upchurch) is a big key 
for what we try to do offensively." 



For complete story 
visit nsucurrentsauee.com 




Demons sail past 
SLU Lions, 103-68 

"The kids came in focused and did all the things that are 
necessary for us to be successful. My hats off to them for 
competing the way they did because Southeastern s a very 
good team that is very talented. " - Mike McConathy 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Transfer Brison Whites skies up for the dunk. NSU defeated SLU, 103-68 Saturday night. 



Chris Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

The Demons (11-6, 5-2 in con- 
ference) are in third place in 
the Southland conference after 
a loss to Nicholls State (4-12, 3-3 
in conference) and a win against 
Southeastern State (5-11, 3-3 in 
conference) last week. The Demons 
also lead the NCAA in average 
points per game after last week at a 
mark of 85. 

The Demons suffered their sec- 
ond Southland Conference loss 93- 
78 against the Nicholls State Colo- 
nels on Thursday night in Prather 
Coliseum. 

"We have them so many easy 
buckets early, and then we couldn't 
buy one," Demon head coach Mike 
McConathy said. "The ball just 
wouldn't go in. They didn't men- 
tally come in here ready to play, and 
because of that we ended up putting 
one on the right side instead of the 
left side that we should have got- 
ten." 

One of the key players for the De- 
mons, senior guard Shamir Davis, 
shot only 4-10 in the field against 
the Colonels and turned the ball 
over three times. 

"Sometimes the ball bounces like 
that and you just have to keep play- 
ing," Davis said. 

However, the Demons bounced 
back from the poor performance 
with a dominant 103-68 win over 
the Southeastern State Lions on Sat- 
urday night in Prather Coliseum. 

"The kids came in focused and 
did all the things that are necessary 



for us to be successful. My hats off 
to them for competing the way they 
did because Southeastern's a very 
good team that is very talented," 
McConathy said. "We just were a 
much better team then we were on 
Thursday." 

In this game, Davis went 7-9 from 
the field with a perfect 5-5 from be- 
hind the 3-point line without turning 
over the ball. Davis scored 24 points 
in the game, his best performance of 
the season. 

"In the Nicholls game, we didn't 
knock down a lot of the shots we 
normally knock down," Davis said. 
"We went up against a good team 
in Southeastern tonight and we 
knocked down a lot of the shots we 
didn't knock down against Nicholls 
State. We came in with the same 
game plan we did against Nicholls 
State. We didn't try to change any- 
thing. Confidence was the key." 

The Demons will try to use their 
impressive offense to overcome a 
Steven F. Austin team boasting an 
impressive defense. 

The Lumberjacks are coming into 
this game allowing just an average 
of 46.6 points per game. That de- 
fense has led the Lumberjacks to a 
16-1 record including 7-0 in South- 
land Conference play. The Demons 
have yet to play against a defense as 
good as Stephen F. Austin yet this 
season, but the Lumberjacks have 
not seen an offense as good as the 
Demons either. 

The Northwestern State Demons 
will meet the Stephen F. Austin 
Lumberjacks in Prather Coliseum 
this Saturday at 3:00 pm. 



Tennis hopes to start season off on the right foot 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

Consistency has been a theme 
for Northwestern State's ten- 
nis team, and head coach Pat- 
ric Dubois believes this year will not 
be different. 

"We had a solid fall season of in- 
dividual results in individual tourna- 
ments with improvement on the part 
of everyone. We now have to put 
all of this together and compete at a 
high level as a team each and every 
time out this spring." 

Depth will be an essential tool for 
the Lady Demons this season. Eight 
players compete for six starting 
spots. The number includes senior 
team captain Andrea Nedorostova, 
who is the only senior for the team. 

"Andrea has been an outstanding 
competitor and teammate during her 
four years as a Lady Demon," Du- 
bois said. "She is a very hard worker 
who continues to improve on the 
court and as a leader." 

Dubois describes Nedorostova as 
a quiet leader that leads by example 
through her actions on the court, off 
the court, and in the classroom. 

"Her teammates see how hard she 
works and strives to improve and the 
results she gets; this certainly sets 
the tone for her teammates," Dubois- 



said. 

The Czech Republic native earned 
All-Southland Conference Women's 
Tennis Team second team honors, 
LSWA All-Louisiana Tennis Team 
second team honors and Southland 
Conference All-Academic Team 
second team honors. 

She finished with a singles record 
of 1 3-6 and had a Southland Confer- 
ence record of 8-4 in 2012. 

Nedorostova also had a record 
of 15-4 in doubles play with team- 
mate Tatiana Larina. Larina also per- 
formed well individually during her 
first year as a Demon. 

She was last year's Southland 
Conference Freshman of the Year 
and finished with a singles record of 
1 6-3 and dropped only one match in 
Southland Conference play. 

"Tatiana had flashes of brilliance 
this fall and we expect Tatiana to 
play this spring the way she compet- 
ed most of her freshman campaign, 
which was a very high caliber level 
of tennis," Dubois said. 

Also returning is junior trans- 
fer Polina Konop. Originally from 
Ukraine, Konop finished her first 
season as a Lady Demon with a re- 
cord of 16-3 and earned first team 
All-Southland Conference Women's 
tennis honors. 

"Polina w on a lot of matches this 



fall in singles and showed that she 
can win in doubles with different 
partners, which is always a valuable 
asset," Dubois said. 

Rounding out the returners are 
sophomores Amy Williams, Linda 
Gamo and Olga Leyshyna. Wil- 
liams' first season with the Lady De- 
mons resulted in a singles record of 
6-11 and a doubles record of 7-11. 
Gamo finished her first season with 
the Lady Demons 4-5 in singles 
competition at the No. 3 spot. 
Leyshyna compiled a singles record 
of 4-4. 

Two newcomers. Nataly Krutova 
and Daniela Simnova. joined the 
team. 

"Nataly and Daniela have both 
worked hard on their games and will 
certainly see plenty of action for the 
Lady Demons this spring." Dubois 
said. "They have fit in immediately 
with our system and with their team- 
mates in general to help continue our 
great tradition of strength as a team." 

"Competition always brings out 
the best in our team and keeps all 
players prepared to represent the 
Lady Demons when called upon." 
Dubois said. "Our team needs to 
stay healthy and play at a high level 
every match as I believe this is the 
strongest SLC Tennis Conference I 
have ever seen from top to bottom." 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Andrea Nedorstova volleys the ball back to her opponent. Nedo- 
rostova is the only senior for the Lady Demons this year. Also 
returning for NSU is SLU Freshman of the Year, Tatiana Larina. 



New Demon football head coach Jay Thomas names coordinators for the 2013 NSU football season 




Courtesy of Sports Info: 

New Northwestern State foot- 
ball coach Jay Thomas has 
assembled his coaching staff, 
starting with coordinators 
Robby Brown and Chris Boone, 
who bring strong credentials to the 
Demons' program. 

Brown, the offensive coordinator, 
helped Valdosta State win the NCAA 
Division II national championship in 
2012 as his offense averaged 469 
yards and produced 40 points per 
game. 

A former Georgia Tech quarter- 
back whose coaching career began 



at Troy as he helped the Trojans 
win the 2006 Sun Belt Conference 
championship. Brown has been run 
record-shattering offenses as the co- 
ordinator at Henderson State (2008) 
and Southwest Baptist (2007) before 
coaching at Valdosta from 2009-12. 

Boone will run the Demons' 
defense following seven impres- 
sive seasons as defensive coordina- 
tor helping Tennessee-Martin and 
Jacksonville State win Ohio Valley 
Conference titles. He coached with 
Thomas at Nicholls State in 2002- 
03 when the Colonels played for 
the 2003 Southland title, and since 
helped UT-Martin win the OVC in 



2006 and Jacksonville State to the 
20 1 1 league co-championship. 

"We're very fortunate to have 
two rising stars in the coaching pro- 
fession here at Northwestern State. 
They're very qualified coaches, great 
men, good dads and it's very excit- 
ing to consider what they will bring 
to our football program and the NSU 
family," said Thomas. 

Their hirings are subject to the ap- 
proval of the Board of Supervisors 
of the University of Louisiana Sys- 



For complete story 
visit nsudemons.com 




u rrent 



Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, January 30, 20]j. ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 13 



NSU receives best rating by U. S. News 



Courtesy of News Bureau 

Northwestern State Universi- 
ty's online degree programs 
were included in the 2013 
edition of Top Online Education 
Program rankings by U.S. News & 
World Report. 

Northwestern State's online 
bachelor's programs were ranked 
57th and the online graduate pro- 
gram in education was also ranked. 
This is the second year for U.S. 
News ranking of online programs 
and the first year for numeric rank- 
ings for degree programs. 

The university's online bach- 
elor's programs were ranked 31st in 
the country in student engagement 
and assessment and 46th in student 
service and technology. Northwest- 
ern State's graduate programs were 
ranked 5 1 st in student engagement 
and accreditation and 75th in stu- 
dent services and technology. 

"Northwestern State has sought a 



leadership role in the delivery of on- 
line education for the past decade. 
These rankings show the university 
is committed to providing quality 
academic programs using the latest 
technology in course delivery," said 
Northwestern State President Dr. 
Randall J. Webb. 

The rankings in student services 
and technology evaluate the way 
programs allow students to par- 
ticipate in online classes and how 
faculty assesses class work. 

NSU was the only Louisiana uni- 
versity ranked for its online bach- 
elor's programs. Northwestern State 
was the only Louisiana university to 
receive rankings in student engage- 
ment and assessment on the bach- 
elor's level and a graduate ranking 
in student services and technology. 
NSU was the highest ranked univer- 
sity in the state for student service 
and technology on the bachelor's 
level and graduate student engage- 
ment and accreditation. 



"Northwestern State strives 
to provide quality programs and 
services for students," said Dr. 
Darlene Williams, vice president for 
technology, research and economic 
development. "It's wonderful to 
receive this type of recognition that 
can only be attributed to the excep- 
tional faculty and staff who work 
with our students every day." 

Online bachelor's degree 
programs in education as well as 
graduate online degree programs in 
business, education, engineering, 
nursing and computer information 
technology were ranked. 

The rankings for degree pro- 
grams are based on criteria includ- 
ing student engagement, faculty 
credentials and training and student 
services and technology. 

Thirty-two degree programs at 
Northwestern State are available 
online. Information on electronic 
classes at NSU is available at ensu. 
nsula.edu. 




Photo Courtesy of New Bureau 
The university's online bachelor's programs were ranked 31st in the country in student engag- 
ment and assessment. Northwestern State offers over 30 accredited online degree programs. 



Students weigh in on the recent gun violence in headlines 



Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

After being re-elected, Presi- 
dent Barack Obama proposed 
a new gun control plan that 
will reinstate an assault weapons ban 
which expired in 2003, limiting the 
size of ammunition magazines and 
also mandatory background checks 
for anyone who seeks to purchase 
weapons or high capacity clips. 

Spurred by the recent events 
of shootings that have occurred, 
Obama tasked his administration 
Wednesday with creating concrete 
proposals to reduce gun violence 
that has plagued the country. 

Recently, Vice President Joe 
Biden was joined by U.S. Senator, 
Tim Kaine, of Virginia-governor 



during the Virginia Tech shooting In 2012 there was reportedly an av- one incident has sparked an interest 
in Richmond, VA-to produce future erage of nine shootings ranging from and a want for change in local state 
plans for gun control. Together they a 14-year-old student shooting him- officials such as senators and repre- 



held a round-table 
discussion speak- 
ing with people 
who worked on 
gun safety after 
the 2007 Virginia 
Tech shooting. 

According to 
npr.com, "There 
are things you can 
do that work," 
Kaine said. "We 
don't have to de- 
spair about being should be 
able to reduce gun violence. There self in front of 70 of his classmates left up to the states digression and 
are things you can do that work to re- to the most recent in Connecticut not the federal government, 
duce gun violence. You can do them when Adam Lanza killed 20 students "Gun control, in my opinion is 
by working together." and six other school authorities. This different everywhere," McGraw 




sentatives 
all the way 
up to con- 
gressman 
in Wash- 
i n g t o n , 
DC. 

Taylor 
McGraw, 
nursing 
transfer stu- 
dent, feels 
that control 



said. "If lawmakers are going to pro- 
pose laws, they should make laws 
particular for every state because the 
need for guns is different for every- 
one." 

The most recent shooting that oc- 
curred at Texas Community College 
was over someone accidently bump- 
ing into another. Shots were report- 
edly fired, an immediate lockdown 
was called but no one was injured. 
There are currently two suspects in 
custody who are being questioned 
about the details of the incident. 

Thomas Johnson, freshman, 
criminal justice major, is in favor of 
Obama's proposal. 

"Having the assault weapon law 
reinstated also background checks 
and limited size for magazines will 
be a positive for the nation," Johnson 



said. 

"By limiting the size of magazines 
a person can buy, guns will become 
the true meaning of what they are 
meant to do. Guns are to protect only 
in a matter of when felt attack and 
also for hunting reasons. I truly be- 
lieve those two reasons are the only 
reasons someone should have a gun. 
I also believe that someone should 
undergo extensive applications be- 
fore receiving a gun and also signing 
some type of contract stating what 
the weapon will be used for." 

Obama's plan for gun control has 
23 executive actions on guns and re- 
lated mental health issues that he can 
take without congressional approval. 
The legislative proposal includes an 
assalt weapons ban, a magazine limit 
and universal background checks. 



Upcoming Events 

Jan. 27 - 
NSU Horn Day, Fine Arts 
Complex, 1 p.m. 

Jan. 31 
Flight Instruction Open 
House, Cane River Room, 
Friedman Student Union, 3 
p.m. 

Jan. 31 
Praxis I Test Preparation 
Seminar, Teacher Education 
Center, Pod-C, Room 104, 
3:30 p.m. 

Feb. 1 

Women's Tennis vs. Abilene 
Christian, Fisher Tennis 
Complex, 1 :30 p.m. 

Feb. 1 

Louisiana Piano Series Inter- 
national presents Jennifer 
Hayghe, Magale Recital Hall, 
7:30 p.m. 

Feb. 2 

Explore Northwestern Day, 
Magale Recital Hall, 9 a.m. 



Counseling and Career Services offer guidance for students 



Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

The transition from high school 
to college can be quite intimi- 
dating and stressful. Many students 
are away from home for the first 
time and take up to 2 1 credit hours, 
join recognized student organiza- 
tions, date and more. 

If one is not careful, it can be 
easy to lose focus and become over- 
whelmed. When students are facing 
issues related to mental health and 
wellness, they can seek help from 
the Counseling and Career Services 
center located on the third floor of 
the Student Union. 

The Center for Disease Control 
defines mental health as "a state of 
well-being in which the individual 
realizes his or her own abilities, can 
cope with the normal stresses of life, 
can work productively and fruitfully, 
and is able to make a contribution to 
his or her community." 

Kim Johnson, a counselor for 
the CCS says that mental health is 
a major problem for NSU students. 
While the students who come to her 
for counseling struggle with a vari- 




Photo Courtesy of CCS 

Counseling and Career Services is located on the third floor of the Union. 

ety of issues, the two biggest prob- seek counseling. 



lems that they face are stress and 
depression. How does one cope with 
such issues? 

To better deal with stress, John- 
son recommends that students utilize 
better time management, get plenty 
of sleep and proper nutrition, and 
exercise to work off the tension of 
the day. For larger issues of tragedy, 
such as the Sandy Hook Elementary 
School shooting in Newtown, Con- 
necticut, Johnson thinks that stu- 
dents, parents, etc. should definitely 



"Coping varies by individuals," 
Johnson said. "Turn to your support 
system of family and friends to talk 
about your feelings, seek counseling 
so that you can talk about your per- 
sonal concerns and issues related to 
what happened and take measures to 
ensure your own personal safety." 

It is important to take care of 
oneself during such dark times. In- 
dividuals should ensure that they are 
eating and sleeping as well as coping 
in constructive ways. One should not 



allow himself to turn to unhealthy 
measures such as drugs and alco- 
hol. 

Johnson and her co-workers 
understand that there is a stigma 
attached to seeking professional 
help. However, she encourages stu- 
dents to take a risk and come in at 
least once and see what they think. 

Johnson added that most stu- 
dents are usually glad they did it 
and want to return. 

CCS also offers services in- 
cluding career assessments and 
courses, career guidance, career 
fairs and special events, job search, 
mock interviews and resume writ- 
ing assistance. 

John Fugler is a freshman crim- 
inal justice major who previously 
worked with the on-campus police. 
1 have only been to CCS once to 
see what it was about," Fugler said. 
"I was able to find job placement 
through the work study program, 
but I would not be opposed to seek- 
ing help from CCS in the future if 
necessary." 

Krystin Steelman, a sophomore 
English major, finds CCS to be 
very helpful to students. She went 



to the center for help with finding 
employment and writing her resume. 

"The counselors are very nice, 
friendly and nonjudgmental," Steel- 
man said. "1 told my friend that if 
she needed help finding a job CCS is 
one of the best places to go." 

For more information on the 
Counseling and Career Services cen- 
ter, log onto http://www.ccs.nsula. 
edu. To make an appointment with 
a counselor, either call (318) 357- 
562 1 or go to room 305 of the Syl- 
van Friedman Student Union. 



Student Messenger 
Alert 

Previous Term Balances 
are due in full 

Spring 2013 Charges 
are availible for viewing 

Check your student 
email accounts for more 
information 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

58733° 



Thursday 

63737° 



Friday 

61741° 



Saturday 

67742° 



Sunday 

67749° 




Monday 

69747° 



Tuesday 

63740° 





Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
January 30, 2012 



Alpha Kappa Alpha 
brings awareness to 
hearts in February 

"We 're looking forward to the event and 
seeing everyone come out, have fun and get 
happy for hearts! " -Kyun 'a Fox, senior 



Jessica Blow 

Staff Writer 

Ringing in the month of 
February the Eta Chi 
chapter of Alpha Kappa 
Alpha Sorority Inc., is hosting its 
annual "Pink Goes Red" event 
Friday, Feb. 1 in front of Iberville 
Cafeteria, which is open to all 
Northwestern students. 

Due to the fact that Febru- 
ary is Heart Disease Awareness 
Month, the sorority wanted to 
raise awareness about this and 
other cardiovascular problems 
that could someday affect NSU 
students. 

This is one of the events 
throughout the semester the so- 
rority hosts to fulfill its national 
health initiative. 

"We want to bring awareness 
to the issue and inform students 
about ways they can improve 
their cardiovascular health," 



Kyun'a Fox, committee head, 
said. "My personal favorite way 
of keeping my heart healthy is 
jump roping and I'll be doing 
plenty of that Friday!" 

In addition to lots of jump 
roping, there will be nurses 
checking pulses, stress ball give- 
aways, contests and games from 
10 a.m.-l p.m. and a one-mile 
run around campus from 12 p.m.- 
1 p.m. 

Other NSU Greeks participat- 
ing include members of Alpha 
Omicron Pi, Phi Mu and Theta 
Chi. Health care professionals 
from around Natchitoches and 
members of the ROTC depart- 
ment are also helping out and 
supporting "Pink Goes Red." 

According to Fox, letters were 
also sent to various banks and 
other businesses in the com- 
munity asking for donations for 
the American Heart Association. 
Donations will also be collected 



from students. 

The American Heart Associa- 
tion is a non-profit organization 
in the United States that fosters 
appropriate cardiac care in an 
effort to reduce disabilities and 
deaths caused by cardiovascular 
disease and stroke. Headquar- 
tered in Dallas, Texas, the Ameri- 
can Heart Association's mission 
is "Building healthier lives, free 
of cardiovascular diseases and 
stroke." The motto is "Learn and 
Live." 

According to Fox, the idea 
to have this event came from the 
chapter as a whole around the 
beginning of January. 

"Planning has been a bit 
stressful but everyone has been 
working together to make one of 
our first projects of the semes- 
ter a success," Fox said. "We're 
looking forward to the event and 
seeing everyone Come out, have 
fun and get happy for hearts!" 



J V~> >% ill k Wk 

ME SUPPORT „SU > K < fHf ; S SL00V PRESSURE CMC* 

B^r^vm^ HPHUCH ton, 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

'The Last Stand" 
Rated ? 
4:10 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

"A Haunted House' 
Rated R 

4:20 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

"Texas Chainsaw 3D' 
Rated R 

9:30 p.m. 

"Gangster Squad" 
Rated R 
4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"Mama" 
Rated PG-13 
4:20 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

'Parental Guidance" 
Rated PG 
4:20 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 



Submitted Photo 

The flyer for Alpha Kappa Alpha's annual "Pink Goes Red" event on 
Feb. 1, which brings awareness to proper cardiovascular health. 



iVlV' 




"i30 OVNifl 



Sigma Gamma Rho celebrates Black History Month 



Contessa Wills 

Staff Writer 

Northwestern 's Prissy 
Poodles are kicking off 
Black History Month in a 
major way. On Feb. 5, the ladies 
of Sigma Gamma Rho will host 
"Black In the 21st Century," a 
forum that will address topics 
that affect African Americans. 
Among the issues to be dis- 
cussed are the terms "ghetto" 
and "racism." 

The Merriam- Webster 
Dictionary defines ghetto as "a 
quarter of a city in which Jews 
were formerly required to live; 



a quarter of a city in which 
members of a minority group 
live especially because of social, 
legal or economic pressure." 
The Urban Dictionary, however, 
defines ghetto as "a derogatory 
term used towards individuals 
who lack the standards of man- 
ners and/or ethics." 

At some point these defini- 
tions were combined to describe 
the people who live in impover- 
ished areas more so than the area 
itself. 

"Ghetto is a state of mind," 
Kayla Jacobs, SGRho president, 
said. "It was originally used as 
an economic term that has been 



twisted to stereotype others." 

Despite the fact that indi- 
viduals of several races display 
behavior that can be described 
as ghetto, it is usually African 
Americans and Latinos that are 
labeled this way. 

"It has almost become pride- 
ful to label oneself as ghetto," 
Megan George, SGRho vice 
president, said. "We need to 
move away from that. With this 
forum I would like to present the 
origins of the word. Why is this 
a stigma with African Ameri- 
cans? With African American 
men? We could say that it has 
gotten better with President 



Obama in office; however, it re- 
ally hasn't." 

So, what does it mean to be 
Black in the 21st century? 

It 'iil^ - 

"Being Black is Whatever 
people want it to mean," Jacobs 
said. "If you use your color as 
an excuse, then that's what it 
"will be for you. If you embrace 
it, you're just a normal person." 

Besides the forum, SGRho 
will host their "Sigma Social" 
for young women interested 
in becoming members of their 
sorority on Feb. 6 in room 321 
of the Student Union. Prospec- 
tive candidates are encouraged 
to bring an unofficial transcript, 



dress in casual attire and should 
have at least 12 credit hours 
and a 2.0 GPA or higher. Even 
if a interested Poodle meets the 
required criteria, there are still 
other qualities that the organiza- 
tion looks for in a member. 

"We seek quality over quan- 
tity," George said. "The women 
should be honest hardworking, 
humble and have a good person- 
ality." 

For more information regard- 
ing intake, female students may 
contact Megan George at (225) 
250-8355. 

Ending their week, on Thurs- 
day, Feb. 7, the ladies will host 



the "Mr. Blue and Gold Pageant 
Informational" for any male 
students who are interested in 
competing. 

"The pageant is intended to 
recognize men who have ex- 
celled in various areas of their 
collegiate careers," Jacobs said. 
"These are men who have bal- 
anced their academics and extra- 
curricular activities and they are 
leaders in all that they do. This 
pageant allows us to showcase 
them to the university." 

For more information regard- 
ing Sigma Gamma Rho, students 
may log onto http://sgrhol922. 
org/. 



A southerner's wish is a northerner's aggravation 




As my child- 
hood years 
passed 
growing 
up in the south, I 
always remember 
looking for- Jacob Labutka 
ward to every Style Columnist 
winter (ex- 
cluding the many times when it's 
35 degrees one day and 75 degrees 
the next day). We can be the most 
comfortable in winter because we 
can keep putting layers on. but in 
warmer seasons we can't exactly 
keep taking layers off. 

Of course with every winter 
in Louisiana comes the inevitable 
question: "Where's the snow?" 
Residents of the "boot state" might 
expect snow once every few years, 
but that doesn't mean we don't 
hope for a White Christmas every 
year. 

As we all know, when clouds 
release their snowy flakes, what 
falls on the ground is reminiscent 
of a halfway melted snow cone. 
Those of us who have never gone 
north for the winter find ourselves 
feeling like Ariel in the deep blue 



see wanting more. 
However, those who have been 
north for many winters often sing 
a different tune. It's all nice and 
pretty until you have to shovel 
your driveway and lose control of 
your vehicle if you drive too fast 
on icy roads. 

Living north of the land of 
spicy foods and jazz, I'm start- 
ing to see what these folks were 
talking about. For the most part, 
driving isn't terrible in cities where 
the roadways are cleared of icy 
precipitation and then salted. 

However, the real fun begins 
when one ventures to places 
where they pay less attention to 
clearing and salting. For example, 
if you need to make a sudden 
right turn on an icy road, it's not 
happening. If you also think that 
going 50 mph in such conditions is 
a good idea, then you'll probably 
crash and hit a deer in the process 
(that did not happen to me just to 
clarify). 

Also, if you don't wear the right 
shoes and socks, then walking for • 
an extended period of time makes 
you feel like your feet are gone. 



When you finally do make it to 
your car, prepare for snow to melt 
all over your floor. 

Despite its setbacks, there is a 
pleasant aesthetic to northern snow 
that cannot be denied. The first 
time I saw a frosted landscape on 
my drive to Ohio my eyes widened 
with delight. Two weeks later, 
while taking snapshots in a snow- 
covered suburb I immediately 
thought this should be on the cover 
of my Christmas cards next year. 

It's also pleasant to hold snow 
and see it not melt in a matter of 
seconds. And when enough of it 
collects on the ground it feels like 
I'm walking on soft cotton. 

Everything being said. I think 
no matter where we live there will 
always be something to complain 
about regarding the weather. I 
think the only place that would be 
just right for Goldilocks is some- 
where along the Mediterranean. 
The climate there is one of the 
most comfortable on the planet 
and the Alps are not too far away if 
you need the magic of snow during 
winter without having to clean up 
after it. 




Photo by Jacob Labutka 

A long way from the south, Jacob Labutka studying abroad at Cleveland State University offers a sneak peak 
of the snow covered campus, one wintery day. 





pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
January 30, 2012 



Skinny girls may have big feelings 



Ever since I was able to 
interact with people, one of 
the first sentences uttered 
out of their mouths is, 
"You're so skinny!" That 
would usually be followed 
by a giggle and an innocent 
blush. As I grew older, the 
connotation of that simple 
sentence went from positive 
to harshly negative. 




grandmother passed away, she was 
almost as small as I am now. So, 
needless to say 1 have the skinny 
genes. 

However, there are 
downfalls to being this 
skinny. Sure, I look easily 
breakable and my weight 
fluctuates between 104 and 
1 07 pounds, but I cannot 
fit into a pair of jeans 



I would like everyone Camille Mosley to save my life. Even 
to know that I am Freshman Scholar skinny jeans are too 

genetically skinny. There baggy on me. I sag with 

is a difference between me and the normal jeans and sweatpants — even 
supermodels most people associate yoga pants are too loose on me. 
skinniness with. Just before my Don't even get me started on trying 



to shop for undergarments that fit! 

Ever since those dreaded junior 
high days, I have been criticized for 
my size and, recently, an incident 
occurred that ruffled my feathers. 
I was sitting with some larger girls 
(friends of a friend) when they 
started picking on skinny girls in 
general. ("Picking on" is a term 
used loosely, I may add.) 

I happened to be sitting next 
to them and they had no regard 
for their words. When one of the 
girls noticed my friend, who was 
exchanging glances with me, she 
asked what was so funny. My friend 
looked at me and I muttered a very 



disheartened, "I'm one of those 
skinny girls." 

The girls then tried to retract 
their words, but hurtful things aren't 
something one can easily take back. 
Then the one sitting next to me had 
the gall to tell me, "Well, that's all 
going to catch up to you." Gee, 
thanks. 

After talking about this incident 
with a few friends, one of my male 
friends told me, "Well, you're a 
skinny girl with big feelings." He 
was exactly right, too! In the end, 
no one can really help his or her 
body type. I mean, not to sound too 
cheesy or anything, but Lady Gaga 



has something g»ing when she 
wrote "Born This Way." 

We're all born this way, so we 
either have to accept who we are, 
or find a way to improve ourselves. 
At least, that is nyv philosophy and 
I think it would benefit everyone 
if they adopted a similar train of 
thought. . 

So, the next time you see your v 
skinny friend getting picked on by 
some larger-than-life characters, 
stick up for her or him! They can't 
help the way they're made, so don't 
let them get accused of something 
that isn't their fault! 



______ 



We need writers! 

Our newspaper 
needs stories written 
by students. Come 
by our office, 227 
Kyser, if you would 
like to join. 



Meetings every 
Monday at 4:00 p.m. 
We hope to hear 

from you! 

" | 

- Current Sauce staff 

- M i 




Certainly not a miserable experience 
Rating: •• 



• ••o 

Annie Desoto-Buras 

Guest columnist 

Despite the fact that it is the 
most recent in a long line 
of incarnations, this year's 
version of Victor Hugo's novel "Les 
Miserables" is quite enjoyable. 

The well known characters 
are played by actors of note, and 
although not all of those actors are 
trained singers, by and large they 
do manage to pull it off respectably; 
what they lack in finesse and polish 
they make up for in emotion and 



conviction. 

The main character of the movie, 
Jean Valjean (Hugh Jackman), 
was imprisoned for 19 years 
after stealing a loaf of bread and 
attempting to escape multiple times. 
After his release, he is forced to 
carry a card labeling him as an 
ex-convict, which makes finding 
employment extremely difficult. 

After being converted by the 
goodness of a bishop from whom 
he stole some valuables, Valjean 
breaks his parole and decides to 
spend his life devoted to goodness 
and to God, working his way up 
to being the mayor of a town. He 



ends up becoming the guardian of 
the daughter of a prostitute named 
Fantine (Anne Hathaway) and 
raising her as his own after taking 
her from the clutches of the abusive 
Thenardiers (Sacha Baron Cohen 
and Helena Bonham Carter). 

Once the girl, Cosette (Amanda 
Seyfried), grows up, she falls in 
love with a revolutionary named 
Marius (Eddie Redmayne). This 
embroils Valjean and Cosette 
in the plight of the revolution, 
bringing them into contact with 
the revolutionaries' leader Enjolras 
(Aaron Tveit) and the Thenardiers' 
daughter Eponine (Samantha 
Barks). 

Throughout this time, Valjean is 
being pursued by Inspector Javert 
(Russell Crowe), who sees him 
as an unrepentant criminal who 
has run away from his deserved 
punishment. 

While some of the cast members 
have been involved in musical 
productions before, for the most 
part this is not a group of actors 
who have been musically trained. 



This fact is made all the more 
astonishing when one considers that 
all of the singing that is heard in 
the movie is live, and was recorded 
as the scenes were being shot. This 
eliminates any studio polishing 
and allows the performances to be 
heard as they were delivered while 
losing none of the feeling which the 
singers imparted. 

Though none of the performers 
are shoddy, Hathaway and Jackman 
distinguish themselves in their 
roles with remarkable emotipn and 
ability. 

Crowe's performance is perhaps 
rougher than most of the others, 
due to his character's range being 
somewhat higher than the one to 
which his voice naturally lends 
itself. He still delivers admirably, 
though, and doesn't discredit the I 
film in any meaningful way. 

When taking everything into 
consideration, this movie is 
certainly not a waste of either the 
time or the money of those who 
choose to see it. 



Xh 




u rrent 



Jimmie Walker 


Andrea Nederostova 


Editor-in-Chief 


Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 


Contessa Wills 


Adviser 


Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 


Oamian Glover 


News Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Alexis Reliford 


Chris Degeyter 


Life Editor 

i 


Sauce Reporter 


Jimmie Walker 


Jessica Blow 


Sports Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Catherine Beverly 


JC Bryant 


Opinions Editor 


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Copy Editor 


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Lifestyle Columnist 


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Women in combat: New questions arise 



R.F.D. 



by Mike Marland 




Fifty years after the start of the 
sexual revolution and the women's 
liberation movement, women are 
still fighting for equality and respect. 
From the latest news of the New Mexico 
bill that proposes the use of victimized 
women as incubators for their 
own case evidence to the variety 
of unequal treatment that stems 
from the societal movement to 
protect women. 

As a woman, I am a member 
of the weaker (but, fairer!) sex. 
While this means I receive 

, ttc i • . . c Catherine Beverly 

the old-fashioned bonus of J 

being instinctively protected Opinions Editor 
by most men, it also means 
that I am not allowed some of the same 
considerations that men are. My protection 
comes with a price. 

Despite this inequality, the outlook on 
life seems to be shifting for many women. 
A recent change allows women to serve on 
the frontline in military combat, something 
I believe was sparked by the acceptance of 
women onto naval submarines a few years 
ago. This acceptance of women in combat 
positions represents a major change 
in what society normally stereotypes 
as the most conservative of America's 
population. 

There are some restrictions on this new 
development, but many interested parties 
on the Internet are asking one simple 
question: Will women be included in the 
draft? Will their equality be absolute? 

Personally, I am horrified by the idea 
of serving in the military, but I think it 
is necessary to make these decisions. If 
women are able to serve in the military, 
they should be counted among their fellow 
brothers-in-arms. 



As I previously stated, most of the 
separations between men and women are 
enforced by society because we are seen 
as unequal. Not different, unequal. 
Why do I say this? Because there are 
already lower requirements for women to 
be accepted into the military. 
While these were not combat 
roles, we were still given an 
easy time because we are seen 
as the weaker sex. Until the 
people of the United States 
realize that women will work 
for what they what, we will 
always be seen as lesser. 

In an attempt to allow 
more freedom to women, 
we've built ourselves into a corner where 
servicemen may not respect their sisters- 
in-arms solely because they entire the 
military knowing that women are treated 
differently. That we are "special". 

So, when it comes to the decision of 
including women over the age of 1 8 in 
the draft, I say that it is necessary to be 
taken seriously. Instead of lowering the 
standards for women, make men and 
women equal. If there are fewer women 
in the military as consequence, at least 
we will know that the women that are 
accepted are just as capable as the men. 
For those intent on serving as IT, or 
another non-combat position, maybe 
the fitness level should be lowered all 
around. 

I do not want to seem uncaring to the 
plight of women everywhere, but this is 
the only response I think of that finally 
sets us as equals - not almost-equals, 
not as the exception to the rule, but as 
equals. 




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UITT TO 



BUT TRUE 

By Samantha Weaver 

■ft was MartmLutherKmg.fr. who 
made the following sage ofosff\-anm. 
'Shallow understanding from people 
of good will is more frustrating than 
absolute rmsunderaeHadmg firan peo- 
ple of ffl will.'' 

■ Are yon a dromaraamac? If you 
travel compulsively, you are. 

• The famed startoe "Venus de Mik> 
was lost to history for nearly 2,000 
years. No one knew of its mm^rp 
until 1820. when a Greek peasant 
tiffing a field on the island of MJos 
hit stone — several carved blocks 
of stone, fia be specific. Within a 
few weeks, archaeologists arrived 
and took the statue of Ajxxodte to 
France. King Lotos XVHI dubbed it 
the \enus de Milo and donated it to 
the Louvre, where it remains today 

■ Yon might be surprised to leant 
that Hutaplu e v Bo gait wasn't the 
producers' first choice tor the role 
of Rick in Xasahlanca. 7 ' An actor 
named George Raft was originally 
offered the part, bathe taraeditdowi 
because he didn't hke me scnpt. 

■In 2010. anew species of stag was 
discovered in the mmircmms of Bor- 
neo, it is distinguished from other 
spedes of stag by its novel method 
of mating: It shoots its mate with a 
so-called kive dart made of cakaum 
carbonate and containing 
The researchers nicknamed the gas- 
tropods ~umja stags. 7 ' 

* If you're traveling to Kansas any- 
time soon, be sure to remember that ir 
is agamst the law tathat state to catch 
fish with, your bare hands. 

- During the original tun of the 
classic 1960s TV series 'Gflfrgan's 
Island, 7 ' some viewers took the show 
rather too seriously. Several tele- 
grams were sent to die U.S. Coast 
Guard asking why the poor people 
hadn' t yet been rescued 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 




Northwestern State 
outlasted in overtime 
loss against SFA, 50-57 




PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
January 30, 2012 



Chistopher Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

Missed opportunities plagued 
the Lady Demons as they 
fell to the Stephen F. Austin 
Ladyjacks (9-10, 4-4 in Southland 
Conference) in overtime Saturday 
afternoon 50-57. 

The Lady Demons (7-11, 3-5 in 
the Southland) were 8 of 1 5 from the 
free throw line, including two miss- 
es from sophomore guard Arianna 
Ausmer to end regulation 48-48. 
Stephen F. Austin proceeded to pull 
away from the Lady Demons, while 
the Lady Demons could only score 
two points in the overtime. 

"SFA did a really good job defen- 
sively on us," Brooke Stoehr, Lady 
Demon co-head coach, said. "They 
really took away some streaks of 
ours. We've been shooting the bas- 
ketball a lot better than we did, and 
that's disappointing." 

Stoehr said the team did play the 
way they wanted to play-fighting 
every possession without worrying 
about the last. 

Senior center Jasmine Upchurch 
only played 27 minutes in the game, 
despite having played over 30 min- 
utes in each of the Lady Demons' 
wins over the two game streak. Up- 
church managed to score 12 points, 
her season average, and went 6 for 



15 from the field, a better shooting 
percentage than her performance last 
week against Southeastern. Howev- 
er, the Ladyjacks never sent her to 
the free throw line, where she has 
a .706 shooting percentage for the 
season including a 7-8 performance 
against the Lady Lions. 

"We did everything we were sup- 
posed to do, and we did everything 
we went over in practice these last 
four or five days," Upchurch said. 
We just couldn't finish. SFA is one of 
the most athletic teams we've played 
so far. 1 thought we played well, ac- 
tually. Coming to the end, we just 
couldn't pull it off." 

The Lady Demons finish the 
stretch of home conference games 
2-1 heading into a week of road 
games. The next game for the Lady 
Demons will be against the Lamar 
Lady Cardinals. 

The Lady Cardinals are currently 
holding on to a 12-6 record includ- 
ing 5-3 in Southland Conference 
play, also holding third place in the 
conference. 

However, the Lady Cardinals are 
coming off of an overtime loss as 
well and are on a two game losing 
streak. 

The Lady Demons will meet the 
Lady Cardinals on Thursday at the 
Montagne Center in Beaumont, Tex- 
as at 5:15 p.m. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Sophomore Arianne Ausmer dives for a loose ball. NSU lost in 
overtime, 57-50, to the Ladyjacks of Stephen F. Austin. 

NSU baseball opens practice 

Courtesy of Sports Info some toughness and a level of ma- 

turity in the fact that we're having 
to do defensive stuff at the football 
stadium, then get offensive work at 
our batting cages, and then fortunate 
enough to go to Natchitoches Cen- 
tral to get our intrasquad done," said 
Burroughs. "We're very thankful for 
those guys helping us out." 

NSU returns 10 lettermen in- 
cluding 2012 All-SLC second team 
winner Will Watson. Watson was 
voted to the College Sports Madness 
All-SLC Preseason First Team. The 
Southland Conference will release 
the teams as voted on by the leagues 
coaches and sports information di- 
rectors Wednesday. 

Position players that return are 
Matt Farmer, Mitch Huckabay, Todd 
Wallace, Matt Bums, Nick Purdy, 
and Matt Baca. Pitchers coming 
back are Andrew Adams and A.J. 
Funk. 

Infielder/outfielder Edwin Gomez 
and pitcher Joey Parrack will head- 
line 22 newcomers. 

This weekend the players will be 



The Northwestern State base- 
ball team, under the new di- 
rection of head coach Lane 
Burroughs, opened practice for the 
20 1 3 season Saturday. 

"During the first day, the pitchers 
were ahead and looked really good, 
and on day two the hitters showed it 
was their day," said Burroughs. "So 
it's just like any program this time of 
year that is opening up. Somebody 
is going to leave unhappy whether 
it's the pitching guys or the hitting 
guys." 

The Demons will try to find its 
way back to the Southland Confer- 
ence tournament after missing the 
2012 tournament with a 19-32 sea- 
son including a 14-19 SLC record. 

"The difference in now and the 
fall is that now we have to figure out 
what our lineup is going to be," said 
Burroughs. "We need to see who 
can play and where, and we have a 
limited time to do so." 

The start to this season has been 
a bit different from past seasons be- 
cause the turf at Brown-Stroud field 
is being replaced. 

"I think our guys are showing 




r complete story, 
visit nsudemons.com 




Submitted Photo 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Senior forward James Hulbin scores inside the paint over the smaller SFA defender. Hulbin nailed the go-ahead three pointer with 
13.7 seconds left in regulation to propel the Demons in front of the Lumberjacks, 61-57, Saturday in Prather Coliseum. 




Hulbin's 

outstanding 

stats 

Hulbin lead all Demons with 1 9 
points against SFA 

50 % 

Hulbin sank 3-6 from beyond the 
arc, including the bucket that gave 
NSU the lead 



Hulbin blocked two shots during 
the contest, including one late in 
the game against SFA. 



Clutch three gives 
NSU edge over SFA 



Jimmie Walker 

Ed it or- In- Ch ief 



44 



I 




can tell you from the horses mouth, 
James Hulbin has never made a shot 
like that," Shamir Davis, teammate 
and long-time friend of Hulbin, said. 

Hulbin. sometimes jokingly referred to 
by his teammates as "Big Game James," 
catapulted the Demons to a 61 -57 victory 
over SLC rivals Stephen F. Austin with a 
three-pointer in the dying embers of the 
Saturday game in Prather Coliseum. 

Transfer DeQuan Hicks drove to the 
lane and kicked it out to wide open Hulbin 
standing near the short corner. Hulbin squared 
up and knocked down the go-ahead three- 
pointer with 13.7 seconds left in regulation. 

"It's just thousands of shots of 
preparation," Hulbin said. "Coach Lewit 
works w ith me after practice and we build on 
repetition. My teammates trusted me and I 
knocked it down." 

NSU (12-6 overall, 6-2 in the Southland) 
entered the game as the nation's top scoring 
offense, averaging 85 ppg., and SFA (16-2, 
7-1) the nation's top scoring defense, holding 
opponents to 49 ppg. 

Before Hulbin's bucket, the Demons could 
not buy a shot from beyond the arc. NSU 



made 1 9 percent, connecting only four 
of its 2 1 attempts. That percentage is the 
second worst this season for the Demons. 
The worst came against Campbell when the 
Demons made a minuscule 1 1 percent. 

With two minutes left in the game, 
SFA lead NSU, 57-50. Two scores and 
uncharacteristic defensive stands by the 
Demons closed the game to 57-54. Demon 
guard Jalan West pulled the Demons within 
one point when he scored a baseline floater 
over an outstretched SFA defender. 

"We have to do more than just score, 
and I think we did that today," Demon head 
coach Mike McConathy said. "We created 
opportunities with our defense and with our 
backs to the wall, we made the plays to win 
against a quality opponent. I'm happy we 
were able to reward our fans for sticking 
with us all the way, and now we take a day 
to rest and we get to work on our game at 
Lamar. This is fun today, but it's only one 
win and we need to validate today's effort 
with how we play going forward." 

The Demons hope to take the momentum 
from the win on the road as NSU heads 
to Beaumont to face the Lamar Cardinals 
Thursday night. After that game, NSU will 
continue its road trip, this time visiting 
the McNeese Cowboys for a Super Bowl 
Sunday tip off. 



Moving on the next stage: My last season as a Demon 



My last semester at NSU 
started in January. I was 
waiting for this moment 
so long. However, now that it has 
come, I am less excited than 1 was 
before. Are you asking why? 

I have spent almost 4 years at 
NSU. I have been a student and an 
athlete. When I came to Natchi- 
toches, I was a complete stranger 
from a different country. 

Now, I call Natchitoches my 
second home. This small town is so 
enchanting for its friendly and wel- 
coming people. 1 will have a hard 
time leaving Natchitoches the day 
after my graduation. However, in my 
heart I know that I will come back. 




and not just once. 

I have had the 
time of my life at 
NSU. I have been 
^^^^B playing NCAA 
Division I tennis 
while getting an 
education — the 
two things that 
are so hard to 
combine back 
in my home 
country. My freshman year was 
extremely successful because my 
team won the Southland Conference 
Championship in regular season and 
also the Southland Conference Tour- 
nament, which qualified us for Na- 



Andrea Nedorotsova 

Staff Reporter 



tionals. I was always on top of my 
academics, and great tennis results 
seemed like the cherry on the top. 

One of my favorite things at NSU 
has been being a part of the team. 
I have found many true life-time 
friends that I want to stay in touch 
with after I leave from here. With my 
teammates we have shared our suc- 
cesses, failures, fun times and hard 
times. We were waking up for prac- 
tices together, and we were studying 
all nights long together as well. 

There has been one extra thing 
we have shared — most of us are not 
Americans, and the amount of jokes 
and funny situations that have been 
created because of the language bar- 



rier is immense. For an illustration, 
one of my teammates was talking 
about a bee, but she could not re- 
member how to say the word "bee" 
in English, and she described it as a 
"mosquito that brings honey." I still 
laugh today when I think of it. 

My NSU experience has been so 
wonderful in all aspects that it makes 
me sad when I think of leaving. On 
one hand. I am looking forward to 
the next challenge of being on my 
own and the next step in my life. 
On the other hand, the future scares 
me. I will have to become an inde- 
pendent individual. Here, I feel like 
I was taken care of. After graduation, 
the real life will kick in. 



r 



The 




u rrent 



Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, February 6, 2013 o Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 14 



ROTC shares input on dismissed military ban 




Photo Courtesy of New Bureau 
Newly commisioned officer Robeneyce Green will have the opportunity to join her male coun- 
terparts on the frontlines due to the dismissal of the women in combat ban last month. 



Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 

A ban that restricted women 
from entering combat at the 
infantry level was recently 
lifted. The ban, placed in 1994, 
prohibited women from fighting 
in small combat units and allowed 
certain military branches the power 
to ban women from their ranks. 

This change isn't immediate 
since branches have until 2016 to 
fully implement women into their 
ranks or present reasoning as to 
why they should be excluded. 

"Women in combat is a mis- 
nomer", William Underwood, 
Lieutenant Colonel and professor 
of military science, said. "Women 
were and are in combat even before 
the lifting of the ban. 

According to Underwood, the 
ban was specifically on infantry, 
any small group with the sole pur- 
pose of engaging the enemy. 

All other roles such as pilots, 
engineers, nurses were always open 
to women. The distance between 
the frontline soldiers in combat and 
these other jobs is small if there at 



"To me it's not any- 
thing out of the ordi- 
nary. When I look at a 
soldier, I see a soldier. 
Diversity makes us 

Strong. " -Chelsey Berlin 

all. 

"The unit always goes with sup- 
port, so women were always on the 
front line," Underwood said. 

Shortly before the ban, women 
were being introduced into front- 
line combat situations and these at- 
tempts lead to overturn of the ban. 

Chelsey Berlin, a senior in 
ROTC, followed news on the ban 
rather closely. 

"In some ways I'm upset it was 
there," Berlin said. 

Berlin added that she is happy 
the ban is lifted. 

Several thousand positions 
will soon be open to women. Since 
women make up approximately 
1 5 percent of the military this will 
allow those best qualified, with no 



restrictions, to be selected. 

'To me it's not anything out of 
the ordinary," Underwood said. 
"When I look at a soldier, I see a 
soldier. Diversity makes us strong." 

Martina Moore, ROTC senior, 
served in Afghanistan. Before be- 
ing deployed she didn't think much 
about the ban. Being in Afghani- 
stan raised her awaress of the situ- 
ation. She said that it will take a lot 
of effort for this change to be fully 
implemented but the end result is 
worth filling positions based on 
skill alone. 

While most frontline positions 
should be able to accept women as 
early as this year other, branches 
such as the Navy SEALS and the 
Marines will probably take longer 
to take women into their ranks. 

Berlin stated that while these 
branches allowed women to train 
with them, the women were not 
allowed to actually enlist. 

The army is a reflection of our 
society," Underwood said. The 
army has been 100 percent volun- 
teer-based since 1 972 and open- 
ing these positions to women just 
shows how dedicated everyone is. 



Students anticipate Spring Grad Fest 



Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

The end is almost near for the 
graduating class of 2013. As 
students settle into_ the semester, 
graduating seniors are #x$ously pre- 
paring for commencement. Though 
these preparations can be daunting 
and overwhelming, students will not 
have to do it on their own. 

On Tuesday, Feb. 19, the Alumni 
Association will host "Spring Grad 
Fest" in the Student Union Ballroom 
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

"Grad Fest is a vender fair that 
allows students to take care of every- 
thing they need to in preparation for 
graduation," Haley Blount, Direc- 
tor of Alumni Affairs, said. "They 
can visit with financial aid, take a 
graduation picture and order class 
rings, announcements and caps and 
gowns." 

Kaysee Carrere, an English-pro- 
fessional writing major, and Geoff 
Hollis, a graphic design major will 
both be attending Grad Fest. Carrere 
will be ordering her cap and gown 
as well as announcements. She also 
intends to take her graduation photo. 

"I'm going with my friends," Car- 
rere said. "It will be a bonding expe- 
rience for us." 

Hollis also intends to order his 



cap and gown as well as graduation 
announcements. 

He reflected on his time as a stu- 
" HehF at Norm'westerrT 

"It has been an interesting ex- 
perience," Hollis said. "I've gained 
lots of work experience working on 
the yearbook, and^.'ve learned a lot 
working with new software that 1 
hadn't used before." 

Students may also order tran- 
scripts from the Registrar's Office 
and receive information on graduate 
school programs. 

"Every department that has a 
graduate program will be there." 
Blount said. 

Students who are seeking to at- 
tend graduate school elsewhere, will 
have to obtain information on those 
schools in their own spare time as 
Northwestern 's graduate programs 
will be the only ones highlighted 
during this event. 

Students will also be offered 
the opportunity to join the Alumni 
Association, which seeks to pro- 
mote "the advancement of academic 
excellence by developing coalition 
among alumni, students, friends and 
the university community while sup- 
porting our university's traditions, 
values and future." 

There are several benefits to 
becoming a member of the Alumni 



Association. 

"Members are able to remain 
updated on fellow alumni and events 
siry l l ncjugh tbg"AkmT-- 
ni Columns," a quarterly publica- 
tion," Blount said. "Members also 
receive a 10 percent discount on 
Hertz car rentals and Choice Hotels, 
and they can tailgate with us for free 
at football games." 

Though "Grad Fest" is a con- 
venient option, students are not re- 
quired to attend this event. 

"Grad Fest is simply a courtesy 
to graduating seniors," Blount said. 

Students who opt to not par- 
ticipate may contact the individual 
venders at a later date. It is ajso 
likely that students do not wish to 
use venders provided. No student is 
obligated use Jostens for class rings 
or Candid Campus Photography for 
their graduation photos. 

"The only item that students must 
order is the cap and gown, which can 
be obtained through the bookstore," 
Blount said. 

Students will also be given an 
opportunity to save a few bucks. If 
students go through each vender, 
their names will be entered into a 
drawing for door prizes. One of the 
prizes is a free class ring, while the 
other is a free set of graduation an- 
nouncements. All graduating seniors 
are encouraged to attend the event. 



Crews receive Nth Degree 





Courtesy of News Bureau 



Northwestern State University President Dr. Ran- 
dall J. Webb, left, awarded an Nth Degree to Jacqu< 
Crew, center, and Robert Crew in recognition o: 
their years of service to NSU. Robert Crew has beer 
executive assistant to the president for 16 years aftei 
working in the Louisiana Department of Education 
Jacque Crew was a distinguished educator, whe 
volunteered countless hours to assist Northwesterr 
State and Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority. The Nth De- 
gree is one of the university's highest honors anc 
is bestowed for going the extra mile in meritoriou: 
service to mankind. It is presented to those whost 
professional responsibilities and various other role; 
in making this a better world are carried out to th< 
Nth Degree. 




Photo Courtesy of New Bureau 

The Cammie G. Henry Research Center, located on the third floor of the library, contains Louisi- 
ana books, rare books, archival materials, archives, microfilm, maps, newspapers and tapes. 

Watson Library recieves a large trust 



Courtesy of News Bureau 

\yu orthwestern State University's 
^ Cammie G. Henry Research 
Center received a trust of $200,000 
from a benefactor whose collection 
of family documents has been man- 
aged by the NSU Archives for more 
than 40 years. 

The bequest from the estate of 
the late Edward Myers Egan is the 
largest single monetary donation to 
benefit Northwestern State's Eugene 
P. Watson Memorial Library. 

Edward Myers Egan, who passed 
away in May 2012, was a descen- 
dant of Dr. Bartholomew Egan, a 
figure of historic interest in Louisi- 
ana. 

The Egan Collection includes let- 
ters and documents from Dr. Bar- 
tholomew Egan and other members 
of the Egan family that provide 
valuable information to research- 
ers interested in the history of the 
Baptist denomination in Louisiana, 
Confederate medical history and 



daily life in 19th century rural north 
Louisiana. 

According to NSU Archivist Mary 
Linn Wernet, the Egan Collection 
documents Dr. Bartholomew Egan's 
life from the time before he immi- 
grated from Dublin, Ireland, to Vir- 
ginia, where he received medical 
training, was a prominent educator 
and converted to the Baptist faith. 
After moving to Mount Lebanon, 
La., in 1847, he was instrumental in 
founding the Louisiana Baptist Con- 
vention and Mount Lebanon Univer- 
sity, the first university in north Loui- 
siana. Dr. Bartholomew Egan served 
as surgeon general and head of the 
state laboratory under the Confeder- 
ate government of Louisiana. 

"After Dr. Egan received a land 
grant to settle in Bienville Parish, 
he established Mount Lebanon as 
a Baptist college for men," Wernet 
said. "We have letters from Ireland 
and as he moved from there to Vir- 
ginia and Louisiana. We have offi- 
cial and family letters from Mount 
Lebanon days and into the Civil War 



when he was surgeon general." 

Dr. Bartholomew Egan's grand- 
daughter, Miss Lavinia Egan, who 
was born during the Civil War and 
died during World War II, is credited 
with gathering and preserving many 
of the letters and documents that 
make up the collection, Wernet said. 
"Lavinia moved to Shreveport and 
was an advocate for women's rights 
and a historian who maintained the 
collection," Wernet explained. 

"The papers have been re- 
searched by historians not only inter- 
ested in Bartholomew's life but also 
in Mount Lebanon as the first school 
of its kind in the area and because of 
the medical research that took place 
there. It was a place where they 
conducted pharmaceutical research 
and developed compounds to treat 
the wounded during the Civil War, 
so there are professors of pharma- 



For the rest of this story, check 
out Avww.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

69754° 



Thursday 

74752° 



Friday 

63746° 



Saturday 

66756° 



Sunday 

72754° 



Monday 

64742° 



Tuesday 

59735° 





Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
February 6, 2013 



KNWD returns with big changes 



Jessica Blow 

Staff Writer 



Kicking the spring semester 
off with bigger and better 
things including more DJ 
shows and new equipment 
is KNWD 91.7 The Demon, the 
student run radio station. 

"We have made many new 
changes to the station, from 
music programming to news 
broadcasts," Arthur Dew, KNWD 
advisor, said. "Most of these 
changes have been done by our 
station manager, Tara Luck, and 
of course our excellent staff." 

Dew has worked with KNWD 
as an advisor since the summer 
of 2008, and he is proud of the 
changes KNWD are making. 
This semester KNWD's DJ shows 
have expanded to 42 shows from 
about 15 shows just last semester. 
Terrance Bartten, junior mass 



communications major, is excited KNWD. 



to start co-hosting with a friend 
on KNWD. They will talk about 
the latest topics, sports and play- 
music. 

"I had an opportunity last semes- 
ter, but I was adjusting to the 
new school and schedule," 
Bartten said. 
Later semester, Bartten 
transferred from Louisiana 
College where he also was a 
DJ. 

Tara Luck, general manager and 
senior liberal arts ma 
jor, describes the 
process of starting 
KNWD back up for 
the spring as "absolutely 
hectic." 

Luck said becoming a DJ is a 
little more intensive than in the 
past. Students had to undergo 
training to get accustomed to the 
equipment before going on-air, 
something that just started for 




"My job has been made easier 
because of our training program 
for DJ personnel," Dew said. 

Besides playing music and 
hosting shows, KNWD is doing 

things outside of the station 
f j as well. The staff will host 
K "Demon Fest" live on the ra- 
dio in March for local bands 
and groups to showcase their 
talent. 

Live feed on the radio, station 
renovations, news comput- 
ers and software are 
new changes KNWD 
are making. The new 
software will allow the 
radio to stream live on 
the Internet. Luck wants 
to stream through the SHOUTcast 
streaming site. 

According to www.SHOUT- 
cast.com, the website offers 
thousands of free Internet radio 
stations from DJs and broadcast- 



ers around the world. 
"I must applaud our staff, all 
whom are professional and dili- 
gent in most areas of operation," 
Dew said. 

If you want to get involved 
with KNWD, you can become 
a part of its street team. As part 
of the street team, students will 
have an opportunity to help 
KNWD by promoting its station 
and events. The staff is also look- 
ing for music-loving students to 
volunteer with "Demon Fest." 

Students can give feedback 
and contact KNWD by phone at 
318-357-5693, Facebook, email 
at KNWDradio@gmail.com, 
Orgsync or visiting the station on 
the first floor of Kyser. 

Tune into KNWD 91.7 The 
Demon for the new DJ shows, 
music, news and much more. 
Later in the semester, students 
may even get to hear KNWD on 
the Internet. 




Submitted Photo 

Mascot Vic the Demon sports headphones on KNWD's promotional 
flyer for their "Demon Fest" in March held for local bands and groups 
to showcase their talent. 



Students gear up for Mardi Gras holiday 



Alexis Reliford 

Life Editor 

With the weekend quickly 
approaching, Northwest- 
ern students are prepar- 
ing to hit 1-49 south for the Mardi 
Gras festivities. 

According to mardigrasnewor- 
lcans.com, the origins of Mardi 
Gras can be traced to medieval 
Europe, passing through Rome 
and Venice in the 17th and 18th 
centuries to the French House of 
the Bourbons. From here, the tra- 
ditional revelry of "Boeuf Gras," 
or fatted calf, followed France to 
her colonies. 

On March 2, 1699, French- 
Canadian explorer Jean Baptiste 
Le Moyne Sieur de Bienville ar- 
rived at a plot of ground 60 miles 
directly south of New Orleans, 
naming it "Pointe du Mardi Gras" 



when his men realized it was the 
eve of that festive holiday. Bien- 
ville also established "Fort Louis 
de la Louisiane" (which is now 
called "La Mobile" ) in 1702. In 
1703, the tiny settlement of Fort 
Louis de la Mobile celebrated 
America's very first Mardi Gras. 

Bienville established New 
Orleans in 1718. By the 1730s, 
Mardi Gras was celebrated 
openly in New Orleans, but not 
with the parades we know today. 
In the early 1740s, Louisiana's 
governor, Marquis de Vaudreuil 
("Grand Marquis") established 
elegant society balls— the model 
for the New Orleans Mardi Gras 
balls of today. 

By the late 1830s, New 
Orleans held street processions 
of maskers with carriages and 
horseback riders to celebrate 
Mardi Gras. Today the tradition 



has grown to include extravagant 
floats and performances. 

According to Tree Faster, a 
junior social work major, she has 
been to New Orleans for Mardi 
Gras too many times to count. 

"The older you are the more 
fun it is, hecause you're able 
to do more," Easter said. "I'm 
looking forward to the extrava- 
gant parades and floats, but most 
importantly I'm ready to ride the 
mechanical bull!" 

Besides just enjoying the 
parades, bulls and abundance of 
"liquid fun," some students visit 
the colorful city for other rea- 
sons. 

"I go not only to have fun, but 
also to visit some of my family 
in New Orleans," Kyla Harrell, 

junior biology major, said. "I've 
been every year except the year 
right after Hurricane Katrina hit." 



But what would a good Mardi 
Gras be without the signature 
dessert King Cake? 

As part of New Orleans' 
Christian faith, the coming of 
the wise men bearing gifts to the 
Christ Child is celebrated 12 days 
after Christmas. We refer to this 
as the Feast of the Epiphanyr«f 
Little Christmas on the Twelfth 
Night. This is a time of celebra- 
tion, exchanging gifts and feast- 
ing. 

Today, the tradition contin- 
ues as people all over the world 
gather for festive Twelfth Night 
celebrations. A popular custom 
was and still is the baking of a 
special cake in honor of the three 
kings, called "A King's Cake." 

Inside every cake is a tiny 
baby (generally plastic now, but 
sometimes this baby might be 
made of porcelain or even gold). 



The tradition of having King 
Cake Parties has evolved through 
time, and the person who receives 
the slice of cake w ith the baby is 
awarded good fortune and asked 
to continue the festivities by 
hosting the next King Cake party. 

"Every time I go to Mardi 
Gras the first thing I look for 
is King Cake," senior general 
studies major Keyonna Jefferson, 
said. "Maybe one day I'll actu- 
ally find the baby." 

Even with all the fun and 
excitement, Mardi Gras can also 
be a dangerous time if students 
choose not to make wise deci- 
sions. 

According to statistics from 
the 2012 Mardi Gras festivi- 
ties released by Louisiana State 
Troopers, that weekend resulted 
in 1 8 narcotics seizures, 1 7 
juvenile contacts (curfew and 



underage drinking), 21 -felony 
arrest (1 1 narcotics related) and 
92 arrests for various crimes 
(I)WI. disorderly conduct, simple 
possession of narcotics and other 
related charges). 

Troopers' activities were 
focused specifically along the 
parade routes, such as Canal and 
Bourbon Street and in heavily 
congested areas throughout the 
French Quarter. Unfortunately, 
Troopers also investigated seven 
fatal crashes through the week- 
end. A common aspect of these 
fatal crashes was the lack of seat 
belt use. 

"I'm going to make sure to be 
safe and stay away from anything 
that looks violent." Jefferson 
said. "I'm just looking forward 
to having fun and returning home 
safely. I have got to graduate in 
May!" 



New place brings new tastes 




It all began at 
the table of a 
restaurant in 
Louisville, KY. I 
ordered a quesa- 
dilla that was Jacob Labutka 
filled with a Style Columnist 
spicy sauce 

and scattered with jalapenos. 

There was only one problem: I 
wasn't reaching for my drink after 
a few bites. I knew I was leaving 
the land of spicy and I hadn't even 
crossed the Mason Dixon line. 

I mentioned a few weeks ago 
that I would be on the lookout for 
the spicy and flavorful, and I've 
begun my journey. Unfortunately, 
almost everything I have eaten 
just doesn't satisfy my taste buds 
like robust Louisiana cooking. 

The other day I hoped that the 
end of my spice-light streak would 
be over when I ordered Kung Po 
chicken from a Chinese place and 
selected the spiciest option. How- 
ever, when I took that first bite I 
knew that this kind of spicy would 
be considered mild back home. 

Thinking that all hope was lost, 
I decided to give one more place a 
try. About a 20 minute drive from 
Cleveland State is a supposedly 




Photo by Jacob Labutka 



There are fewer meals up north than the hearty, traditional 
southern comfort food of red beans and rice and BBQ wings. 



Cajun restaurant. My previous ex- 
periences with Cajun food outside 
of Louisiana were the equivalent 
of buying a knock off designer 
bag or Dollar Tree's version of an 
Armani fragrance instead of the 
real thing. 



Despite my doubts I put aside 
my cynicism and gave the place a 
try. I first tried a Cleveland native 
dish called the "Polish Boy." It 
didn't have the spicy kick I had 
hoped for. but it was actually 
nonetheless delectable. 



The "Polish Boy" consisted of 
a thick link of sausage on a bun 
covered BBQ sauce and scattered 
with French fries and coleslaw. 
It was the perfect combination of 
sweet and salty, but it wasn't quite 
what I was looking for. 

When hope seemed lost of 
spicing up my taste buds I ate 
a bite of red beans and rice and 
everything changed. It certainly 
wasn't the best version of it I've 
had in my life, but it definitely 
exceeded my expectations. 

The dish was one of the 
spiciest I've had in weeks and it 
contained the right aromatic veg- 
etables that made me enjoy bite 
after bite. 

From the beginning I knew 
that food would never be the same 
as it is in Louisiana. However, 
life more often than not involves 
adapting to change and making the 
most of it. 

So for now I'll continue ex- 
ploring this food culture and enjoy 
being able to try new things. If all 
else fails when you miss the food 
back home, then the only thing 
you can do is to cook it yourself. 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

"Warm Bodies" 
Rated PG-13 
4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

"A Haunted House' 
Rated R 

4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.fn. 9:40 p.m. 

'Mama' 
Rated PG-13 
4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 




Did You 
Know? 

Craving King Cake during the 
break and aren't able to make it 
to New Orleans? Bust out your 
parent's pots and pans and try 
making your ow n. Simple recipes 
for how to make your own yellow, 
purple and green confection can 
be found online at allrecipes.com/ 
recipc/mardi-gras-king-cake. 



Have a fun and safe 
Mardi Gras break 
from The Current 
Sauce staff! 






pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat . be ve rly @yahoo. com 
February 6, 2013 



Students respond to hot question, 'Apple or Android?' 



The age old question that 
has been asked since their 
introduction is, "Which is 
better, iPhones or Androids?" Well, 
coming from someone who used 
an iPod Touch and is now 
a strict Android user, the 
answer is quite clear to 
me — Androids, duh. 

However, not everyone 
agrees with me. For 
example, my roommate, 
Hanna Merida, freshman, 
biology major, still uses a 
Go-Phone. 

"Smartphones, in general, are a 
giant waste of time," Merida said. 
"I think they are huge distractions 
because I have to bang on tables to 
get people's attention." 




Camille Mosley 

Freshman Scholar 



The pros and cons for each 
device can end up making huge 
lists, but from personal experience, 
here are a few for Androids. 

Androids are extremely versatile. 
On my meager Motorola 
Atrix 1 , 1 have sent out 
multiple emails at the 
last minute, some which 
included attachments from 
programs such as Word and 
PowerPoint. 

Needless to say, I can 
make real PowerPoints, 
Word documents and 
even use Excel and Publisher. 
That's just a few good, practical 
qualities. 

Some bad qualities about 
Androids are that one must replace 



the phone within two years. The 
software and technology become 
obsolete very quickly, not to 
mention that the phones have 
the tendency to start shutting off ' 
by itself and can eventually quit 
charging. 

Despite these issues, when new 
phones are released, it makes one 
forget about previous problems. 

As previously mentioned, I once 
had an iPod Touch, so I am not 
completely illiterate when it comes 
to iPhones, but I decided to get 
some students' opinions concerning 
iPhones. An Android-turned- 
iPhone user, John Pearce, freshman 
business administration major, had 
this to say about the Apple mobile 
devices: 



"1 like Apple better because I 
had an Android and that w as a piece 
of junk," Pearce. "I had to turn it off 
all the time. It was slow, it would 
drop service, wouldn't receive text 
messages and it never picked up on 
Wi-Fi. 

"Since switching to an iPhone, 
I can now receive 4G, the phone 
cases are better and the service in 
general is better," Pearce added. 
"There are cooler apps, more 
responsive tools and the technology 
at Apple is better. My Android 
crashed about a couple days after 
I got it, and my iPhone has yet to 
crash." 

Pearce has had his iPhone 4S for 
about three months now. Spencer 
Dohmann, freshman computer 



information systems major, found a 
few faults concerning iPhones that 
Pearce did not bring up: 

"iPhones are made to be 
marketed to the lowest common 
denominator," Dohmann said. 
"Their appeal lies in the sheer 
number of users, which makes their 
App Store appear to be much more 
versatile, while in reality, it actually 
staunches creativity." 

Well there you have it, folks. 
In the end, there is no real better 
mobile device, because each is 
better in its own way. 

Which phone you choose 
depends on your preferences and 
what things you want the phone to 
do for you. 



We need writers! 

Our newspaper 
needs stories written 
by students. Come 
by our office, 227 
Kyser, if you would 
like to join. 

Meetings every 
Monday at 4:00 p.m. 

We hope to hear 

from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" 

Hunting for something fun to do this weekend? 

Rating: ••ooo 



Annie Desoto-Buras 

Guest columnist 

If you're looking for a movie that 
you can enjoy without having to 
think about too much, then look 
no further than "Hansel & Gretel: 
Witch Hunters." It's rated R for 
things like partial nudity, language 
and a bit of gore, so while not family 
entertainment, it's an amusing way to 
pass 88 minutes. 

Hansel (Jeremy Renner) and Gretel 
' (Gemma Arterlon) were left in the 



woods as children, but after killing the 
witch who was interested in eating them, 
they decided to make ridding the world 
of witches their occupation. 

When they are brought into a small 
town that is experiencing a rash of 
missing children, it is up to them to hunt 
down the witches that are responsible, 
including the leader Muriel (Famke 
Janssen), before it is too late. Along the 
way they have to confront some truths 
about themselves and their past with the 
help of a witch-hunting enthusiast Ben 
(Thomas Mann) and a beautiful young 
woman with a secret (Pihla Viitala). 



While enjoyable and entertaining, 
this film certainly isn't "Oscars" 
material. The dialogue and delivery 
could use some work at times, and 
it's not a difficult plot to predict, but 
that doesn't detract too much from the 
experience. 

Attentive viewers can have some 
fun playing mental whack-an-accent, 
since they pop up at random points and 
then disappear again. Only one accent 
is maintained throughout the film, and 
that's probably due to the fact that the 
actress is Finnish and actually has an 
accent. 

There are some witty elements 
that are included in the film though 
(I would direct your attention to the 
missing child flyers wrapped around 
milk bottles), and the costuming and 



makeup for the witches is good. This 
is especially evident during the huge 
witches' meeting toward the end of the 
film, in which at least 50 witches make 
an appearance and no two witches look 
alike. 

Seeing the film in 3-D is fun, and 
there are some nice moments that seem 
filmed specifically for that experience, 
but if moviegoers don't feel inclined to 
pay the extra money then the 3-D isn't 
really required for the movie to be fun. 
That's what this movie is supposed to 
be, after all; it's intended to be fun. 

While not out to win any awards, 
"Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters" 
does what it is meant to do and does it 
admirably. Bring some friends along if 
you go watch it. Being in a group just 
makes the experience that much better. 



The 




u rrent 

auo 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 

Adviser 

Ty Johnson 

News Editor 

Alexis Reliford 

Life Editor 

Jimmie Walker 

Sports Editor 

Catherine Beverly 

Opinions Editor 

Kirstie White 

Copy Editor 

Jacob Labutka 

Lifestyle Columnist 

Andrea Nederostova 

Sauce Reporter 

Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

Chris Oegeyter 

Sauce Reporter 

Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 

JC Bryant 

Social Media 

Camille Mosley 

Freshman Scholar 

Taylor Furr 

Delivery Personnel 

Office phone 
318-357-5456 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



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Future in eye of beholder 



£ £ r I 1 hink about your future" seems to be a 
I common phrase for college-aged people 
to hear when their family meets a new 
significant other. 

While thinking about your future is not a negative 
thing, impressing upon your child that they should be 
thinking of settling down at age 20 is ridiculous. 

For one, the person you are with at age 20 will 
change and so will you, so settling down at that age can 
lead to huge differences in the future. 

I have heard this myself a few 
times. While I'm only 20, 1 have 
been with my boyfriend for two 
and a half years and the last time I 
went home, my dad asked if I've 
thought about our future. 

The first thing I thought to say, 
was "Future?! Pah!," because 
at age 20, 1 had barely lived. Catherine Beverly 

I cannot legally buy Opinions Editor 

alcohol, so why should I be 

considering legally binding myself to another person 
for (supposedly) the rest of my life? 

I suppose if this were the early 20 lh century, when 
the median life expectancy for an American was only 
50 years, pushing your children to marry at 20 would 
not have been a big deal. 

That is no longer the case, as the median life 
expectancy for Americans as of 2003 is 77 years, 
(statistics from aging.senate.gov) 

For a 20 year old, getting married so young is a little 
more daunting when you are told you can look forward 
to another 50 years with the same person. 

It seems unfair to try to get a child to bind themself 
to another person for a third of his or her life when their 
brain has not even fully developed. 

While the average age of marriage in the United 
States has risen to approximately 26 years, it seems 
that the number is being held back by states that are 
considered more rural. 

In the northeast, the median age of first marriage 
is 30 years and older. Those same states have a lower 
rate of divorce and those couples who do divorce have 
a median age lower than the state's median age of 
marriage. 

This shows an increase of divorce in those under the 
age of 30. While this does not necessarily mean that 
those under the age of 30 are incapable of maintaining a 
healthy relationship, but it certainly points to that. 

What I suggest would for parents and their children 
to calm down and realize that people in America do not 
need to rely on marriage partners, they need to rely on 
themselves. 

Once you work through your issues and realize 
what you need, then you are prepared to accept another 
person into your life full-time. 





Cfl 
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! 



RJ-.D. 



VJHAT'S GOfNi' 
OM our MERE, 



OuGRXJl(CO& 




by Mike Marfand 




The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
February 6, 2013 



Demon baseball ready to prove polls wrong 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Staff Reporter 

Feb. 15 will be the first home 
game day of the 2013 season 
for the NSU Demon baseball 
team as they will take on Grambling 
at Brown-Stroud field. The NSU 
Demon baseball team went through 
several changes. 

In the off season, the head coach 
J. P. Davis was replaced by coach 
Lane Burroughs who came from a 
Mississippi State University where 
he worked as the assistant of to head 
coach John Cohen. 

"I have known coach Burroughs 
for about 15 years now, so it is al- 
ways an advantage when you have 
an opportunity to hire somebody 
with whom you have some back- 
ground," Greg Burke, Director of 
Athletics said. "The coach that he 
was working for at Mississippi State, 
John Cohen, was the coach that I 
hired here back in 1 998. Now, Coach 
Burroughs since he has been here 
has done an impressive job of mak- 
ing not just me but a lot of people 
feel good about him being our head 
coach. He has taken the ball and run 
with it and he has done that very well 
so far." 

The players feel that having a new 
head coach is a positive change. 

"The whole team feels really con- 
fident about the new head coach," 
said Jake Clouatre, health and ex- 
ercise science major. "1 have never 
seen a whole group of guys putting 
all their trust into a coach." 

Another important change that 
the NSU Demon baseball team un- 
derwent was electing new captains 
among the players. Seniors Matt 
Baca, Nick Purdy and Will Watson 
were the preferred choices for both 
players and coaching staff. All three 
of them are perceived as great lead- 




Submitted photo 

Senior Will Watson runs the bases after hitting a double. Watson was elected to one of three team captain postions for this season. 



ers however, in different ways. Matt 
Baca is the quite leader while Nick 
Purdy is automatically viewed as a 
leader because he is a catcher who 



leads by an example. Will Watson 
has spent the most time at NSU and 
he was named 2013 preseason All- 
Southland Conference first team. 



Usually, the team has only two cap- 
tains. In this case, coaches decided 
to appoint three captains for the 
20 1 3 season. 



Last but not least, the turf at 
Brown-Stroud field is currently be- 
ing replaced which has caused little 
inconvenience with the team prac- 



tices. 

"While the project is going on of 
course I look on that as a short term 
inconvenience that will soon be a 
long term luxury to play on a brand 
new turf that I think they are going 
to really enjoy," Burke said. "The 
turf was declared unplayable at the 
end of last season and it was a pretty 
lengthy process to get things in place 
to replace the turf. First of all we had 
to let the team play their fall practice 
schedule on the turf, and then begin 
a project. At this point we are hoping 
that it should be completed within 
one week of their first game on Feb- 
ruary 1 5 to allow them some time to 
get on the field." 

"We are very excited about the 
new turf at Brown-Stroud Field, said 
Clouatre. "We have had some diffi- 
culties with practicing. We are cur- 
rently practicing on the football field 
and at Natchitoches Central but we 
are not complaining about it, we are 
embracing it, just trying to get better 
day by day." 

In 2012 season, the Demons went 
19:32 overall (14:19 in SLC). What 
are the outlooks on the 2013 season? 

"I think that on one hand the team 
hasn't played a game yet but at the 
same time in the last seven to eight 
months, Coach Burroughs, his staff 
and his players have created a high 
level of interest and a renewed ener- 
gy around the program that I believe 
is going to translate into a really suc- 
cessful 2013 season," Burke said. 

The atmosphere in the team before 
the season seems very positive. "We 
are all excited about the season," 
said Clouatre. "The polls recently 
came out, and we are not where we 
want to be but we are going to play 
with a chip on our shoulder, and we 
are excited to try to prove people 
wrong." 



Davis, Hulbin's off-court friendship helps on-court play 



Chris Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

Teamwork is a big key to the 
Demons' success this season. 
If players on the court don't get 
along and cooperate, the team falls 
apart. That's why it's important for 
teammates to be friends on and off 
the court, to build the bonds of team- 
work. 

For Senior guard Shamir Davis 
and Senior forward James Hulbin, 
they have that part in the bag. 

Davis and Hulbin have known 
each other all their lives and their re- 
lationship has steadily grown as the 
two have entered their final season 
as Demon basketball teammates. 

"I've known James for a long 
time," Davis said. "I think I saw ev- 
ery shot James took. We joke and 
call him 'Big Game James,' but he 
can make some clutch shots." 

They both learned of NSU basket- 
ball from close friends, letting des- 
tiny guide them here as teammates. 

"When I was in high school, one 
of my former teammates came here 
first," Davis said about deciding 
on the Demons. "He would tell me 
about how they played and how they 
moved the ball up and down. They 
really liked to move the ball and take 
shots. That's how I always wanted 
to play. I don't want to have a slow 
paced game. So that's what sparked 
me coming to NSU." 

Hulbin said he didn't hear a lot 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Seniors Shamir Davis and James Hulbin have been Demon bas- 
ketball players for four years, but teammates for much longer. 



about NSU growing up. He says he 
heard about NSU from former team- 
mates as well, though, and was re- 
cruited. Now that he's here, he feels 



he made the right choice and thai 
this is the right place for him to be. |j 
Davis and Hulbin both agreed 
that it's also nice to have a short trip 



home when they need to relax and 
take vacations. 

Both the guard and the forward 
are doing something right. They 
both are in the top 3 minutes played 
for the Demons along with freshman 
guard Jalan West who is also from 
the Shreveport area. They sit at 2 
and 3 respectively in points scored 
for the Demons, and 3 and 1 respec- 
tively for shooting percentage from 
behind the three point line. 

Davis and Hulbin are also excited 
about the Demons' prospects head- 
ing into the remaining half of confer- 
ence play. 

"We've just gotta continue to play 
Demon basketball," Hulbin said. 
"We've gotta do what we do, pay at- 
tention, and hope we come out with 
the wins." 

"We're on a good pace now," Da- 
vis added. "We're finally getting our 
defense together. I think if we can do 
that now, it will set a good pace for 
us come tournament time." 

Davis and Hulbin will next be 
in action again against the Oral Rob- 
erts Golden Eagles. The Golden 
Eagles beat the Demons in Tulsa, 
Okla., earlier this season to give the 
Demons one of their two conference 
losses. However, a win for the De- 
mons this time would propel them 
over the Golden Eagles into second 
place in the Southland conference. 

The game against the Oral Rob- 
erts Golden Eagles will be Thursday, 
Feb. 7 at Prather Coliseum at 7:30 
p.m. 



Battle for the Paddi 




fVlnt uli r* 7th, 2 Ml . v I cp <*tt : > 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Returning junior Polina Konop sends back a serve against an opponent. 

Lady Demon tennis wins home 
opener against Abilene Christian 



Cayla Mendow 

Sauce Reporter 

Northwestern State women's 
tennis team came out on top 
with a well-earned victory 
against the Abilene Christian Wild- 
cats. 

Lady Demons Tatiana Larina 
and Andrea Nedorostova won their 
doubles match 8-4 against Abilene 
Christian's Julia Mongin 
and Brittney Reed. Polina 
Konop, last week"s South- 
land Conference Player of 
the Week, and her part- 
ner Natalya Krutova, also 
bagged a close 8-6 win 
against Hannah Kelley and 
Micah Hermsdorf. 

In the late afternoon the 
Lady Demons succeeded 
in taking down ACU in 
singles. Tatiana Larina 
won her match against 
Julia Mongin 6-2, 7-6 and 
Konop finished with convincing vic- 
tory of 6-2, 4-6 and 6-3. Krutova 
won 6-2, 6-3 against Brittney Reed. 
Andrea Nedorostova defeated 6-2, 
6-2 against Laura Mongin and Amy 



Williams beat Nada Marjanovic 6-3, 
3-6, 6-4. 

The Lady Demons played in the 
Jack Fisher Tennis Complex for the 
first time this season and it turned 
out to be a huge success for both the 
players and the fans. The doubles 
matches drew in a fairly large crowd 
of support, which assisted in creat- 
ing an exciting atmosphere that pro- 
vided great momentum for players. 
"Playing at home is always 
more fun for the whole 
team," Andrea Nedo- 
rostova, senior captain, 
said. "We had way 
more fans coming out 
on Friday than I ex- 
pected. We were a little 
nervous at the begin- 
ning of doubles but we 
overcame it and we de- 
served to win. The team 
we played is ranked 
third in the United 
States (Division II), and 
they played very well. It's a valuable 
victory for our team." 

The Lady Demons will host 
Southern Miss at NSU's Jack Fisher 
Tennis Complex on Saturday, Feb. 9. 





nt 

Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, February 20, 2013 o Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 15 



Annual Research Day set for Thursday 



Courtesy of News Bureau 

Northwestern State Uni- 
versity's 26th annual Re- 
search Day will be held Thurs- 
day, Feb. 21, according to Dr. 
Margaret E. Cochran, chair of 
the Research Day committee. 

Research Day showcases 
a broad range of graduate and 
undergraduate academic and 
creative endeavors with stu- 
dents offering 15-minute oral 
presentations on their topics, 
followed by question and an- 
swer sessions. 

In addition to dozens of 
concurrent paper sessions, the 
day will include musical pre- 
sentations, a poster session 
and an awards presentation. 
Research presentations will 
be in Morrison Hall with the 
poster session in the Suident 
Union ballroom. 

Presentations represent "the 
spectrum of fine arts, humani- 
ties, sciences and social sci- 
ences," Cochran said. 




Research Day showcases graduate and undergraduate academic 

dents. 

Awards presented will in- 
clude the Dr. Mildred Hart 
Bailey Research Award, the 
Dr. Jean D'Amato Thomas 
Award and the Dr. Marietta 
LeBreton Award. The Mildred 
Hart Bailey Research Award 
recognizes outstanding re- 
search and/or distinguished ar- 



Photo by News Bureau 
and creative endeavors with stu- 



tistic performance or creative 
work substantially completed 
within the past three years and 
is open to all full-time North- 
western faculty and adjunct 
faculty carrying a 12-hour 
equated load. Last year's win- 
ner was Dr. Andrew Crank. 
The Jean D'Amato Thomas 



award is designed to honor se- 
nior faculty members whose 
careers have included a signif- 
icant commitment to research 
and service to their discipline. 
Last year's winner of the Jean 
D'Amato Thomas Award was 
Dr. Karen McFerrin. 

The Marietta LeBreton 



Award honors faculty mem- 
bers whose research careers 
have been dedicated to re- 
search regarding Louisiana 
topics. Nominees may have 
conducted research in any 
discipline. Dr. Hiram "Pete" 
Gregory and Mary Linn Wer- 
net were the first recipients of 
this award. Students will be 
recognized with Outstanding 
Graduate and Undergraduate 
Research Awards for outstand- 
ing research, distinguished ar- 
tistic performance or creative 
work completed by a student 
or team of students. 

Nominations are evalu- 
ated on originality, design and 
methodology, impact on or 
contribution to the student's 
academic field and the poten- 
tial larger impact of the nomi- 
nated work. The student artist 
who designed the Research 
Day poster and program cover 
will also be recognized. 
For more information, visit re- 
searchday.nsula.edu. 




Photo Courtesy of News Bureau 
NSU professor Matt DeFord will collaborate to create art on the river 

Professor contributes to 
downtown Natchitoches 

Courtesy of New Bureau 



Natchitoches artists Matt 
DeFord and Danny 
Brockner are in the pro- 
cess of installing a collabora- 
tive piece of public art on the 
city's downtown riverbank 
near the Roque House. Lo- 
cated on the north end of Rue 
Beauport, the piece entitled 
"Riviere a travers la pierre" 
is one of the first that officials 
hope will enhance the rich 
landscape of Natchitoches' 
downtown historic landmark 
district and engage pedestrians 
in public art displays. Long- 
range plans call for sculpture 
and other installations to be 
placed at designated spots 
throughout the Historic Dis- 
trict. 

DeFord is a professor of 



art at Northwestern State 
University. He collaborated 
with Brockner, a Natchi- 
toches businessman and self- 
taught stone sculptor, to create 
"Riviere a travers la pierre," 
which means "River through 
stone." The two answered a 
national request for proposals 
with a concept that highlights 
the curves of the 36-mile-long 
Cane River Lake and encour- 
ages viewers to identify for 
themselves the locations and 
landmarks along the lake that 
are part of their personal his- 
tory. 

The design, Brockner said, 
was very simple. 

"Most people don't know 
what Cane River looks like, 
how it courses down through 



For the rest of tills story, check 
out www.nsula.edu 



BACCHUS to hostannual campaign 

'Everybody knows somebody' 



Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

ACCHUS is hosting its 
first annual "Everybody 
Knows Somebody" campaign 
during the 26th Annual NEDA 
(National Eating Disorders 
Awareness) week in an effort 
to bring public attention to the 
critical need to raise aware- 
ness and funding to battle eat- 
ing disorders in the U.S. and 
on campus. 

On Monday, from 1 1 a.m. 
until 1 p.m. the organization 
will be outside of Vic's Cafe 
with educational materials 
and resources. Wednesday 
will consist of special mes- 
sages located all throughout 
campus with positive mes- 
sages for students and faculty. 

Josh Boudreaux, a sopho- 
more physical education ma- 
jor, is surprised to see an event 
with its focus on this impor- 
tant subject. 

"I am excited to see what 
BACCUS has to offer stu- 
dents and faculty about this 
campaign and also what infor- 



mation they can provide for us 
the signs of it and what causes 
it," Boudreaux said. 

The Great Jean Giveaway is 
set for Thursday also in front 
of Vic's from 1 1 a.m. until 1 
p.m. This is a signature event 
of NEDA Week. Students and 
faculty are encouraged to do- 
nate their jeans that they no 
longer want or have the need 
for. The motto for that day and 
for the week is "Be comfort- 
able in your genes. Wear jeans 
that fit the real you" They are 
promoting students to accept 
themselves for who they are 
not and not try to be someone 
else. 

During NEDA Week, thou- 
sands of people come together 
in communities across the 
country, hosting events to raise 
awareness about body image 
and bring national attention 
to the severity of eating disor- 
ders, which are illnesses with 
devastating, often life-threat- 
ening, consequences. While 
there is hope and recovery is 
possible-particularly with ear- 
ly intervention-many people 



suffer from long-term effects 
of these illnesses. 

Michelle Thomas, freshman 
dance major and past victim of 
an eating disorderis proud that 
the university is hosting this 
week. 

"When I was going through 
my situation no one was there 
for me and I had to search for 
information myself," Thomas 
said. "This week long event 
may help someone who is go- 
ing through the same thing I 
went through and maybe will 
even save a life." 

Some of the many events 
planned for the week include 
presentations and health fairs 
in schools and on college 
campuses, screenings of infor- 
mational films, fashion shows 
featuring men and women of 
all body types, art shows, The 
Great Jeans Giveaway and 
NEDA Walk fundraisers. 

For information on local 
NEDA Week activities, con- 
tact the NSU BACCHUS 
group by emailing Kim John- 
son at johnsonk@nsula.edu or 
call 357-5621. 



Student Messenger Alert 

New policy for official transcripts 
Students will no longer recieve free official academic transcripts. Students 
may order their transcripts by accessing the online transcript ordering sys- 
tem at http://iwantmytranscript.com. Check your student email account for 
more information. 




Photo Courtesy of News Bureau 
The grant will be put towards 
new equipment, renovations 
and a media lab. 

$25,000 awarded to CAPA 

Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 

new grant has been rewarded 
to CAPA thanks to Sean Al- 
drin. This Assistant Professor of Art 
has only been here since last fall but 
upon arrival he immediately got to 
work on getting a grant for NSU. 
The student technology grant worth 
S25,000 will pay for new equipment 
and renovations to CAPA to create a 
new media lab. 

"The more diversity in their skills 
the better their chances out in the 
field." Aldrin said. "The current hap- 
penings in the economy have made 
it a tough market, the better prepped 
they are the better chance they are." 

The grant will bring in equipment 
such as a green screen, high defini- 
tion cameras and top-of-the-line 
video and audio editing equipment. 

A car mount will be available al- 
lowing the HD cameras to be mount- 
ed on vehicles for moving shots up 
to 65 mph. Other video equipment 
will be powerful portable lighting 
rigs and multiple lenses for different 
camera shots. A recording studio for 
audio is also in the works. 

The grant will bring in several 
iPads and iPod touches. These, 
along with the developer kits, will 
allow students to develop apps and 
install them on the apple devices. 

"This new lab will bring us up to 
speed to prep NSU students in the 
frontier of new media and business," 
Aldrin said. 

The equipment will arrive over 
the course of the summer and will be 
available next fall. With this equip- 
ment students will be able to make 
commercials, apps and other Pjroj-/ 
ects to expand their portfolios. 

Aldrin is very disappointed his 
current seniors won't be able to uti- 
lize the equipment but admits this 
upgrade will put NSU on par with 
the very best. 

"I'm in a position to give that 
back to students who don't have 
the capacity to afford the expensive 
degree." Aldrin said. "We have the 
same degree quality as I think other 
more expensive schools." 



For the rest of this story, check 
out www.n.sucurrenisauce.coni 




Scholars' Day set fo - 

Courtesy of New Bureau 
The Louisiana Scholars' College 
at Northwestern State Universitv 
will hold spring Scholars' Day or 
Saturday, Feb. 23. The event wil 
take place in Morrison Hall and i< 
an opportunity for prospective stu- 
dents and their parents to learn more 
about the Scholars' College. There 
is no charge to attend Scholars' Day 
Lunch will be available for S10. 



Index 1 


Wednesday 

51743° 


Thursday 

67743 


Friday 

67740° 


Saturday 

63740° 


Sunday 

69748° 


Monday 

64738° 


Tuesday 

66742° 


2 Life 


3 Opinions 

4 Sports 


















IFE 



Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
February 20, 2013 



Helping Hands hosts annual 
Black History Month program 



Jessica Blow 

Staff Writer 

Helping Hands will host 
their annual Black History 
Program Feb. 28 at 7 p.m. 
in the Magale Recital Hall. This 
year's theme is titled "I Won't Give 
Up My Seat," and was inspired 
by Rosa Parks, who is famous for 
refusing to give up her bus seat for 
a white man. 

The program will consist of 
Helping Hands participants along 
with Lifted Voices. The student-run 
organization began preparing for 
the program last fall and decided 
on the theme in November. 

Clarissa Morgan, Helping 
Hands President and senior biology 
major said the preparations became 
tedious and handful, but she en- 
joyed looking into all the aspects 
and increasing her knowledge of 
influential individuals. Along with 
playing one of the main characters, 
she contributed to writing the script 
and organizing the program. 

"Practices were long, but we got 
a lot accomplished," Morgan said. 




"It gives them an opportunity to 
express themselves and create what 
they think is important to them," 
Jamie Flanagan, Helping Hands 
advisor, said. 

According to Flanagan the 
program is free to everyone, but 
donations are welcomed. 

"Yes, it's a Black History 



Program, but we want everyone to 
come out and learn and support," 
Flanagan said. 

Morgan believes this program is 
important for everyone to see. 

"Everyone needs to be re- 
minded of our history and to know 
where we came from, to better 
ourselves and to make successful 



progress in the future." 

Rosa Parks was born on Feb. 4. 
1913 in Tuskegee, Al. At an early 
age. Parks' mother moved her fam- 
ily to Pine Level, Al to her parents' 
farm because of the split with her 
husband. 

' In the 1 1 th grade. Parks attend- 
ed a laboratory school for second- 



ary education led by Alabama State 
Teachers College for Negroes, but 
she soon had to quit for the illness 
of her grandmother and mother. 
She then got a job at a shirt factory 
in Montgomery. Al. She married 
Raymond Parks at 19. 

After a long day of w< k on 
Dec. 1, 1955, Parks sat in the first 
several seats in the colored section 
of a bus. The bus became full, and 
several white passengers were left 
standing. The driver stopped and 
asked four black passengers to 
give up there seats. Parks refused. 
Refusing to give up her seat, 
Parks was arrested. The arrest was 
the cause of a statewide boycott, 
which helped changed black his- 
tory. 

Beside Parks' seat refusal, the 
program will discuss a variety of 
historical black people and the 
issues they faced in a time of dis- 
crimination and segregation. 

"This is not only a focus on 
African-American history, but 
American history." Morgan said. 
"Everyone gets something out of 
it." 



jParkway Cinema! 

1011 Keyser Avenue 



"Beautiful Creatures' 
Rated PG-13 
4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p. 

"Safe Haven' 
Rated R 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p. 

Identity Theft" 
Rated R 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p. 

-Side Effects" 
Rated R 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p. 

"Warm Bodies' 
Rated PG-13 
4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.i 



The rules and exceptions 
of social possibilites 




Photo submitted by Jacob Labutka 

Jacob Labutka is studying abroad at Cleveland State University and currently resides north of the Mason- 
Dixon line. The Mason-Dixon line is the classic cultural divider between northern and southern states. 




Style Columnist 



Life in the city certainly has 
its perks, but the array of 
shopping opportunities is 
both its greatest strength 
and my greatest weakness. 

Oscar 
Wilde certainly 
once said, "The 
only way to get 
rid of a tempta- 
tion is to yield to 
it." However, Jacob Labutka 
his budget (or 
line of credit) 
was likely 

more extensive then the limit on 
my Visa. 

In life we find ourselves in 
places like cities or faraway 
lands where we must make the 
most of our time given the many 
divergent paths one can take. 
With this array of shopping and 
career options comes a greater 
number and diversity of inhabit- 
ants. 

Given the density of the 
crowd in places like Manhattan 
or Chicago, one might think it 



would statistically be easier to 
meet and grow closer to people. 
Despite what statistics might say, 
is it really easier to be social in 
the city? 

It is certainly easier to do 
social things in the city, but that 
doesn't mean it is easier to be so- 
cial. There are people all around, 
but that doesn't mean they are 
going to stop you on the street 
and say hello. 

Apart from a sideways glance 
indicating lustful motivations 
that one might receive, there 
isn't always an outgoing city 
street culture. The urban hustle 
and bustle is largely comprised 
of people meeting deadlines and 
heading to their next appoint- 
ments. 

There's also something to 
be said for southern hospital- 
ity. There may be problems with 
southern culture, but friendli- 
ness isn't one of them. When one 
walks down the street in a quaint 
southern town or even a bustling 
city, one can expect many other 



pedestrians to wave hello or at 
least acknowledge each other's 
presence. 

Not to say this never happens 
above the Mason-Dixon line, but 
it is my belief that people here 
often prefer to be introduced 
rather than meet spontaneously 
(much like in Jane Austen's 
time). However, with every rule 
there are also many exceptions. 

If we truly want to have it all 
(whatever "all" consists of for 
you), then it's about looking for 
the exceptions wherever you are. 
There are plenty of people in the 
south who won't give you the 
time of day and plenty people 
who identify as Yankees who are 
sweeter than sweet tea. 

I've personally met and 
become friends with wonderful 
people here. Am I the exception 
or the new rule? Regardless, no 
matter where you are, the best 
things and life and the greatest 
experiences you will every have 
will begin by being proactive. 



n.l ftflMD Ita Demon 




ft* U lAii»2*l€ Ai€«4 

U;U(M;UU cm. 





pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
February 20, 2013 



Body acceptance: important value for college students 




The importance of body 
acceptance on a college 
campus could not be 
understated in an age filled 
with such influential 
pressures from peers and 
media. For some, there are 
major issues in the idea of 
body acceptance. 

Some believe body 
acceptance, an originally 
inspiring idea, has 

morphed into an 

c u uu Opinions Editor 

acceptance or unhealthy r 

and harmful lifestyles. 

Others deny that "thin" people 
should be allowed into the body 
acceptance movement. By this, I 
mean that some think those who are 
relatively in shape should not feel 
anxious about their body or physical 



Catherine Beverly 



appearance. That is absurd! 

Personally, I do not think body 
acceptance should be limited to any 
shape or level of fitness. 

The people you think 
are beautiful are likely to 
have problems with their 
appearance. Insecurity 
does not go away with 
a few trips to the gym 
and a good diet (but let's 
be honest, how many 
college students actually 
have a good diet). 
I have to admit, 
for the sake of this article, that 1 
am not very healthy. Despite this, 
I am doing my best to eat right. 
This simple method is my way of 
accepting myself in the shape that 1 
am in. 



The only downfall to the recent 
body acceptance craze is the 
previously mentioned side effect of 
adopting an unhealthy lifestyle and 
using the term "body acceptance" as 
a shield to protect you against what 
may be serious health concerns. 

While I will always support 
body acceptance, 1 believe a person 
should strive to remain healthy, 
Whether healthy for them is a size 
six or a size 16, it does not matter. 

A survey of approximately 4,000 
people by Psychology Today, last 
reviewed in 201 1, revealed that 
89 percent of women wanted to 
lose weight and only eight percent 
wanted to stay the same. While the 
number for men was much lower, it 
still hovered around 50 percent. 

Something astounding the survey 



revealed about Psychology Today's 
readership is that 24 percent of 
women and 1 1 percent of men 
would sacrifice three or more years 
of their life to achieve and maintain 
their goal weight. 

Women between the ages of 1 3 
and 19 most satisfied with their 
appearance, but even with that there 
are still 54 percent surveyed in that 
age group who are dissatisfied. That 
percentage slowly increases with 
each age group. 

While college students may 
not be avid readers of Psychology 
Today, 1 believe the findings of a 
similar survey would show the same 
things if answered by Northwestern 
students, especially since image 
is so important in defining your 
personality. Not to mention the fact 



that many students still live with 
their parents' voices in their heads. 

The important thing to remember 
when following the example of 
those who practice body acceptance 
is to always be your best. It is a 
good to love yourself- which is one 
of the only ways to have enough 
determination to change yourself for 
the better-but remember to keep a 
healthy balance in your life. 

The way I practice acceptance 
towards my body while trying 
to remain healthy is by eating 
in moderation, finding healthy 
alternatives to sweets and snacks 
and reminding myself not to ride 
around parking lots looking for the 
spaces closest to the doors. 

Now, repeat with me: "I try to be 
my best." 



We need 
writers! 

l, J 

Our newspaper 
needs stories written 
by students. Come 
by our office, 227 
Kyser, if you would 
like to join. 

Meetings every 
Monday at 4:00 p.m. 

We hope to hear 
from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



Is technological generation gap already too wide to bridge? 



Ever since the iPod came out, 
technology has been seen 
as "The Devil." However, it 
wasn't really until phones became 
popular with kids that 
adults suddenly came up 
with the common phrase, 
"Technology has ruined 
our kids." 

I remember sitting in 
my high school AP Biology 
II class on the first day 
of class listening to my 
teacher tell us youngins 
how terrible technology 
is and how it has ruined us as a 
generation. 

I did not sit there with a 



dumbfounded or irritated look like 
the rest of the kids in that class. 
I argued with this teacher for 1 
minutes about how technology, 

although can be seen as a 
new vice, is most certainly 
the most wonderful 
innovation to happen to 
the human race. Most 
adults want to look at the 
pessimistic outcomes of 
technology. 

Camille Mosley Technology is defined 
Freshman Scholar by the Google search 

engine as the "application 
of scientific knowledge for practical 
purposes, especially in industry: 
'computer technology.' 




Machinery and equipment 
developed from such scientific 
knowledge." 

Technology is applied science. 
Now doesn't that seem fitting? 
Science has been renowned as devil 
craft since the medieval times, and 
is still seen that way in the sense of 
technology. There is a new witch 
hunt out, but this time it is focused 
on the new wonders of technology. 

I grew up outside as a child. 1 
rode my bike, swam in pools, and I 
hated to be inside. As I grew older, 
and my younger siblings grew older, 
1 realized that their childhood was 
not as adventurous as 1 would have 
liked it to be. They are growing up 



Th 




Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 

Adviser 

Ty Johnson 

News Editor 

Alexis Reliford 

Life Editor 

Jimmie Walker 

Sports Editor 

Catherine Beverly 

Opinions Editor 

Kirstie White 

Copy Editor 

Jacob Labutka 

Lifestyle Columnist 

Andrea Nederostova 

Sauce Reporter 

Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

Chris Degeyter 

Sauce Reporter 

Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 

JC Bryant 

Social Media 

Camille Mosley 

Freshman Scholar 

Taylor Furr 

Delivery Personnel 
Office phone 
318-357-5456 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



King Crossword 



ACROSS 

1 Practice 

boxing 
5 Has 

permission 
8 Suspend 

12 Mah-jongg 
piece 

13 Yoko of 
music 

1 4 By word of 
mouth 

15 Surmoun- 
ting 

16 Kvetch 

1 7 Shrek is 
one 

18 Fancy 
French 
cake 

20 Offer as an 
example 

22 $ dispenser 

23 Comic 
DeLuise 

24 Light bulb 
measure 

27 Lengthwise 
and 

contiguous 

32 Hearty quaff 

33 "The Matrix'' 
role 

"There's 
— in team" 
Huge 
Norms 
(Abbr.) 

39 GIs' 
entertainers 

40 Work with 
42 "The - of 

the Shrew" 



1 


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34 

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45 Finicky cat in 
TV ads 

49 Eye layer 

50 Gorilla 

52 Facility 

53 German city 

54 PC linking 
system 

55 Cleo's river 

56 Picnic 
invaders 
"Guinness 
Book" suffix 
Paradise 



57 



58 



DOWN 

1 Unescorted 

2 Pocket 
bread 

3 Greatly 

4 Echo 



Memorial 
building 
Literary 
collection 
Quiet 
exercise 
Jinx 
Fight 

DEA worker 
Jane Lynch's 
show 
19 What @ 
means 
21 Banned 

pesticide 
24 Humorist 
- Baba 
Enveloping 
membrane 
28 Verdi's "- 
giardin del 



25 

26 



bello" 
Paper 

30 Affirmative 
action? 

31 Insult (SI.) 

36 Easterners 

37 "Smoking or 
— ?" 

38 Tranquil 

41 Therefore 

42 Big brass 

43 Shakes- 
peare's river 

44 Strong wind 

46 Incursion 

47 Wight or 
Man 

48 Witnessed 
51 — de deux 



29 



2013 King Features Synd.. Inc. 





with Wiis, iPads, iPods, computers 
and all of that indoor stuff. 

I have recently accepted, though, 
that this is the generation they live 
in. My siblings and I are eight years 
apart. They will graduate high 
school in the year 2020 while I am 
already off into the working w orld. 
The generational gap has caused an 
insurmountable difference in the 
way that we are raised. 

They sit in their rooms playing 
Xbox and watching their recorded 
shows. 

There isn't a real problem with 
this because that is what they were 
born into — it is what they know. 
Despite all of this, my stepdad 



refuses to accept this reality for his 
children. 

What my dad and many adults 
don't understand is that not every 
child is a baseball star, a dancer, 
a football player or a popular kid. 
With the lack of athletic skills, 
many children turn to video 
games or television as a coping 
mechanism. 

So what? There are now people 
who have become famous through 
the Internet. 

Teenagers nowadays are more 
likely to know about Jenna Marbles 
than whoever is on the latest 
Fathead commercials. 

This is the world that we live in. 



Technology comes easily to us, and 
adults need to accept this. 

In fact, engineers are one of 
the most sought-after candidates 
for a variety of growing fields 
— computer engineers, Disney 
Imagineers, biomedical and 
biochemical engineers, petroleum 
engineers and mechanical 
engineers. 

So, to those who raise the 
complaints I previously stated, all 
I have to say is this: Technology is 
not a devil. It is not here to destroy 
us. It does not make us stupid. It 
is merely the product of a new 
generation. 



eekly SUD0KU 



by Linda Thistle 





5 






1 




6 






3 










8 






7 






2 


3 








9 








9 


6 








7 




2 










7 


5 








4 






2 








1 






3 






1 






2 


5 








6 




8 








2 




9 








3 





Place a number n the empty boxes in such a way 
tnat eac* row ac«jse. each column down and 
oach small & fcax square contains all of the 

nurnt»fs from one to nine 



DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★ * * 



* Moderate * * Challenging 
www HOO BOY! 

© ?0*4 w«*f ?m*m St*d . tot 




ranSe 

BUT TRUE 

By Samantha Weaver 



* It was noted American 
poet Ogden Nash, best 
known as a composer of 
droll vase, who made the 
following sage observation: 

"Some wrtnres are physi- 
cal And some are mmtal, 

But the one that is both Is 
dental* 

• According to the US. 
Department of Agriculture, 
if you're him the average 
American, you rnmiif 
132 pounds of sugar every 
year. Compare that to folks 
in the year 1700, who con- 
sumed only about 4 pounds 
of sugar per year. 

* If you cook a single 
ostrich egg, you can feed 24 
people. 

• When you studied his- 
tory in school, yon prob- 
ably dadn't lesm about 
Edward Hyde. He was a 
cousin to Queen Anne and 
was appointed to the post 
of colonial governor of 
New York, in which posi- 
oon he served ton 1702 to 
1708. Though he's not well 
known now, he was quite 
die talc of the colonies in 
his day. It seems that when 
a delegation of cokansls 



went to his mansion to wel- 
come the new jjuv r no 1 . 
they found him sirring an 
the front porch, crocheting 
a dotty and wearing one of 
fats wife's dresses. At his 
first formal ball as gover- 
nor, he wore a gown. His 
eccentricities^ " continued 
until he was caught embez- 
zling public money and was 
»3umed to Fnglanri 

- He next time you see a 
d aiy i n commercial and 
note how creamy and frothy 
the lamer seems to be. keep 
this in mind: The model m 
the advertisement probably 
has either laundry detergent 
or frothed egg whites oxther 



- Those who study such 
things say that 10 years after 
a hot dog has been dumped 
in a landfill the wiener 
could still be intact 

MM 

Thaagbr far the Day: 

""When yon stop doing 
thm^ K mr fun you tnffi 
as well be dead " — Emor 
Bomngwqy 



Out on a Limb 




] 



by Gary Kupervas 




2om&IE 
Twister 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
February 20, 2013 



NSU rack up wins at weekend tournament 



Brittany Russ 

Sauce Reporter 

The Northwestern State Lady 
Demon softball team was 
crowned champion of the Bull- 
dog Battle hosted by Mississippi 
State this past weekend. 

"We had a great weekend against 
some really good competition," said 
head coach Donald Pickett. "I'm 
glad to see all of the hard work these 
ladies have been doing to be recog- 
nized." 

The Lady Demons (6-2) went 4-1 
in tournament play as they defeated 
Western Kentucky 5-3, Lipscomb 
2-1, host Mississippi State 10-5 and 
Murray State 3-2. Their only loss 
came against Murray State Saturday 
evening as NSU fell 5-4 in the bot- 
tom of the seventh. 

In the final game of the tourna- 
ment, the Lady Demons got its re- 
venge on Murray State. 

The Northwestern State Lady De- 
mon softball team defeated Murray 
State 3-2 Sunday morning, in the fi- 
nal day of the Bulldog Battle hosted 
by Mississippi State 

"It felt good to come in and get 
the win this morning, especially af- 
ter falling to Murray last night," said 
Pickett. "I was really proud of the 
way the team performed at such a 
competitive tournament this week- 
end." 

The Lady Demons improve to 
6-2 as Murray State falls to 1-2 on 
the season. The Racers got off to an 
early start, putting two on the board 
in the top of the first off of a RBI 
single. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Brittany Virgoe makes solid contact with the ball to get on base. Virgoe was named to Primetime Performer of the Week Honor Roll. 



NSU answered back shortly after 
and sealed the victory in the bottom 
of the second as sophomore Brit- 
tany Virgoe stepped up to bat with 
the bases loaded. Virgoe notched 
a single and advanced to third on a 
throwing error, putting the Lady De- 
mons up 3-2. 



Senior Kylie Roos pitched seven 
complete innings to earn the win. 
Roos struck out nine and allowed 
only five hits while facing 29 batters. 

Virgoe led the Lady Demons from 
the plate with two hits and two RBI. 

Perhaps the most impressive win 
of the weekend was NSU's convinc- 



ing win of Mississippi State. 

Roos' first inning grand slam ig- 
nited the Northwestern State Lady 
Demon softball team to defeat host 
Mississippi State, 10-5. 

Virgoe, Tara McKenney and Cali 
Burke loaded up the bases in the top 
of the first to allow Roos to notch her 



first grand slam of the season, put- 
ting the Lady Demons up 4-0 over 
the host Bulldogs. 

The Bulldogs held NSU score- 
less in the second and inched closer 
as Julia Echols notched a RBI single 
to bring Mississippi State within one 
of the Lady Demons. 



In the fourth, NSU crossed the 
plate five times starting with Cassan- 
dra Barefield ripping a RBI single 
to left field, allowing Roos to score 
from third. 

Cheyenne DelaGarza singled 
through the right side to later score, 
and put the Lady Demons up 6-4. 

Virgoe notched a double to left 
field to send Barefield and Jordan 
Palmer home. McKenney added an- 
other tally as she crossed the plate 
on a passed ball, putting the Lady 
Demons up 9-4. The fifth and sixth 
innings were rendered scoreless. 

Virgoe and three other Lady De- 
mons were named to the All-Tour- 
nament team including McKenney, 
Burke and DelaGarza. 

Virgoe had a great weekend at 
the plate hitting .47 1 as she notched 
eight hits, three runs, four RBI and 
one double. Virgoe was able to get 
on base alongside McKenney and 
Burke in the top of the first against 
Mississippi State to allow Roos to 
crank out her first grand slam of the 
season, putting the Lady Demons up 
4-0 en route to a 10-5 victory. 

McKenney put the ball into play 
three times to garner a .3 1 3 average, 
five runs, one RBI and one stolen 
base. Burke collected two hits for a 
.333 average as she crossed the plate 
four times. Burke ripped one double 
and earned one RBI as well. 

DelaGarza also hit .333 on three 
hits for two RBI, two runs, one dou- 
ble and one home run against Mur- 
ray State. 

NSU travels to Alcorn State on 
Wednesday for a double header slat- 
ed to begin at 1 p.m. 





Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Todd Wallace beats the pitch and slides home. Demons beat Grambling in the 16th inning, Sunday. 

Demons open season with 
sweep over Grambling State 



Christopher Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

A walk-off single by senior 
catcher and first baseman 
Todd Wallace drove home 
red-shirt freshman Jake Clouatre to 
earn an 8-7 Demon victory in extra 
innings. 

The victory came after two previ- 
ous victories against the Grambling 
State Tigers (0-3), 1 1-6 and 6-0. The 
sweep puts the Demons starting the 
season at 3-0. 

The Demons were without a run 
for 1 1 innings before Wallace's RBI 
in the 16th. The run also ended a six- 
inning drought of runs from either 
team, as the game progressed deeper 
into extra innings. 

The RBI was Wallace's second 
of the game. He also scored twice 
himself, including a home run in the 
second inning. 

Wallace's home run came after 
another home run by senior desig- 
nated hitter Matt Baca. Both runs 
came in the second while the De- 




mons were down 2-0 to tie the game. 

The game stayed tied at 2-2 until 
the fourth inning, when the Demons 
rallied 5 runs to extend the lead to 
7-2. However, that lead was short 
-lived. The Tigers scored four runs 
of their own the next inning to leave 
the game at 7-6. 

No runs were scored until the final 
inning, when the Tigers managed a 
last effort run to tie the game, then 
kept the Demons from scoring to 
force the extra innings at 7-7. 

No runs were scored in the extra 
innings at all until Wallace's RBI in 
the 1 6th to seal the Demons' 8-7 win. 



"It was a long game," first-year 
head coach Lane Burroughs jokingly 
said. "I can't even remember the first 
half of it. We talk about this every 
single day. Sundays in college base- 
ball is about toughness, especially 
when they're trying to keep from 
getting swept." 

Burroughs added there were 
plenty of times his team could have 
thrown in the flag and give up but 
didn't. 

"We may not be the best team 
in the world, but we've got tough 
kids," Burroughs said. "I think we 
showed a lot of toughness today get- 
ting this win out." 

The Demons proceed into a mid- 
week away game against the UL 
Lafayette Ragin' Cajuns. The game 
will be the Demons' first road test of 
the season. 

The Ragin' Cajuns are coming 
off of a tough 1 0-2 loss in their own 
series this weekend. They finished 
that series 3-1. The Demons meet 
the Ragin' Cajuns tonight at 6 p.m. 
at Moore Field in Lafayette, La. 



Giddens, Tillery earn SLC honors 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

The Northwestern State men's 
and women's track and field 
teams pulled out 12 top three 
finishes at the LSU Twilight Meet 
on Friday evening. 

Seniors Karensa Ellis and Ali 
Fontenot and sophomore Jerrica 
Tillery notched first place finishes 
for the Lady Demons. Ellis won the 
1 mile run with a time of 5:09.84 
and Fontenot registered the top 
finish in the 3000m at 11:01.46. 

Tillery recorded finished first in 
the triple jump with a personal-best 
leap of 39- 10.50. 

The Lady Demons also had three 
second-place performers. Junior 
Keona Jackson placed second in the 
shot put with a throw of 45-06.50 
and Sarah Emory finished just two 
seconds behind Fontenot in the 
3000m with a time of 1 1 :03.42. 

The 4x400 relay team of Quiana 
Griffin, Constance Seibles, Ellis 
and Consuela Lindsay also placed 
second in a season-best time of 
3:53.36. 

Rechelle Bessard threw for 




Gary Hardamon 

Jessica Tillery flies through the air on one of her jumps that 
landed her in first place. Tillery earned SLC honors. 



45-0 1.75 in the shot put and Janae 
Allen registered a personal-best 
mark of 56- 1 in the weight throw 
as both Lady Demons placed third 
in their respective events. 

On the men's side, Brent 
Giddens came in second in the 60m 
hurdles with a time of 8.3 1 . 

Mitch Landry also had a top- 
three performance, placing third in 



the 3000m in 9:09.67. 

The 4x400 relay team of Jarrod 
Charles, Dezrick Williams, Austin 
McCauslin and Gabriel White ran 
a season-best time of 3:25.09, also 
placing third. 

Both NSU teams travel to 
Norman, Oklahoma next weekend 
to compete in the Southland 
Conference Championships. 



Student Media Leaders Needed 

Annual positions open starting summer 2013 

• Argus Editor in Chief 

• Current Sauce Editor in Chief 

• Potpourri Editor in Chief 

• KNWD General Manager 



Applications available for Potpourri and 
Current Sauce in Kyser Hall, RM 225 
Argus 31 6G or 31 6N 
KNWD 31 6D 



Deadline to submit: March 25 
Scholarships Available 

For more information, contact: 
Argus: Dr. Julie Kane, kanej@nsula.edu 
Current Sauce: Dr. Paula Furr, furrp@nsula.edu 
Potpourri: Stephanie Masson, massons@nsula.edu 
KNWD: Arther Dew, dewa@nsula.edu 



* 



u r rent 




Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, February 27, 2013 * Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦Volume 98: Issue 16 



Maggio, Conine named to new positions 



Courtesy of News Bureau 



Dr. Chris Maggio has been 
named Assistant Vice-Pres- 
ident of External Affairs for 
University Advancement in a re- 
alignment of personnel at Northwest- 
ern State University that includes the 
appointment of Mrs. Frances Conine 
as Dean of Students. 

Northwestern president Dr. Randall 
Webb said the reorganization "is de- 
signed to focus increased emphasis 
and attention on the acquisition of 
private funds, recruitment of new 
students and student retention and 
services." 

He said, "As state funding for 
higher education continues to de- 
cline, it is imperative to expand self- 
generated revenues through private 
funds and increased tuition revenues. 
Dr. Maggio has extensive expertise 
and experience in both student re- 
cruitment and fund development." 

Webb added, "Retention of 
current students through outstanding 
services and programs that enhance 
student life is also essential in main- 
taining and increasing enrollment, 
and this reorganization plan reflects 
the importance of student services." 
The NSU president said, "Mrs. 



Conine has been at the forefront for 
years of initiatives to provide effec- 
tive, meaningful services to students, 
and this plan sharpens and magnifies 
the focus on those efforts." 

Under the realignment that is 
pending approval of the Board of Su- 
pervisors of the University of Loui- 
siana System, Maggio will assume 
the responsibilities of the Director of 
University Advancement and main- 
tain the duties of directing student 
recruitment that he held in his previ- 
ous position as Assistant Provost and 
Dean of Students. 

Brad Laird, who has served as 
Director of Advancement over alum- 
ni and development activities, re- 
signed recently to become head foot- 
ball coach at Ruston High School, his 
alma mater. 

Responsibilities for student ser- 
vices arid activities that Maggio held 
as Assistant Provost and Dean of Stu- 
dents will be assumed by Mrs. Co- 
nine and others in the student affairs 
area of the university. 

Webb said, "This new align- 
ment that consolidates, combines 
and reassigns responsibilities of Dr. 
Maggio, Mrs. Conine and others in 
External Affairs and Student Affairs 
will result in overall personnel sav- 
ings for the university while refining 




Photo Courtesy of New Bureau 
Newly named Assistant Vice President of External Affairs, Chris Maggio and newly appointed 
Frances Conine have worked at Northwestern State for a collective total of 50 years since 1981. 



services and relationships with cur- 
rent and prospective students, alumni 
and prospective donors." 
Maggio has been a staff member at 
Northwestern State since 1988. He 
was named Dean of Students and 
Assistant Provost for Student Suc- 
cess in 2007. Maggio was selected as 
Director of Alumni Affairs in 1999, 



Director of Alumni and Development 
in 2003 and Executive Director of the 
NSU Foundation in 2005. 

Under Maggio 's leadership, the 
NSU Foundation completed its first 
capital campaign in Northwestern 's 
history, exceeding a campaign goal 
of $18.84 million and raising $31 
million to support the university. He 



has also been a faculty member in the 
Department of Health and Human 
Performance for 1 1 years. 

During his career at NSU, Mag- 
gio also served as Director of Admis- 
sions and Recruiting and Director of 
Enrollment Services. He joined the 
staff at Northwestern State as wom- 
en's track and field coach. 



Maggio, a 1985 graduate of North- 
western, earned his master's of edu- 
cation at NSU. He received a doctor- 
ate in developmental education from 
Grambling State University. 

Conine has been at Northwestern 
State since 1981, serving as Coor- 
dinator of the College Success Pro- 
gram and Educational Coordinator of 
NSU's Central Louisiana programs 
from 1986 to 1989. 

She was Director of Counseling 
and Career Services from 1989 to 
1998, Director of Student Services 
and Judicial Affairs from 1998 to 
2011. 

Two years ago, Conine was 
named Executive Director of Student 
Development and Student Conduct. 
She has been a faculty member in 
the College of Education and Human 
Development since 1996. 

In 2004-05, Conine was selected 
as President of the Louisiana Associ- 
ation of College and University Stu- 
dent Personnel Administrators. She 
received the Air National Guard Cen- 
ter of Influence Award in 20 1 for her 
influence on a member of the guard 
or their family during a deployment. 

Conine received a bachelor's de- 
gree in sociology at Auburn Univer- 
sity and a master's of education from 
Delta State University. 



( A university should 
not be allowed to 
accept a kid for 
classes knowing that 
kid is depending on 
university-provided 
housing unless the 
housing is up to par 
and available. " 

-Veronica Dohmann 
Parent 




Submitted Photo 

Students complain about of the lack of housing available on campus. 



Housing issues fluster students 



Camille Mosley 

Sauce Reporter 



(4 



■y remember when they told 
me I had to move out of 
Vamado," Spencer Dohm- 
ann, freshman CIS major 
said. "I was sitting in my room when 
I got a knock at the door. It was 3 
p.m. and they said that I had to move 
everything into Columns by 5 p.m. 
that day." 

Dohmann said the room was 
not ready to be moved into. Spencer 
also had to find transportion to move 
his things because he had no car. 

He found the experience to be 
stressful. Veronica Dohmann, Spen- 
cer's mother, was not happy with 
the news. 

"As as angry as I was, it all 
did work out," Veronica Dohmann 
said. "Luckily, he had a brother and 
grandparents who could for over six 
hours on a Monday." 

Although she is thankful Spencer 



was able to get help for the move, 
she said not all students have the re- 
sources to do the same. 

"He is happy where is now, but 
still, no students should have prob- 
lems with having a place to sleep," 
Dohnmann said. "A university 
should not be allowed to accept a 
kid for classes knowing that kid is 
depending on university-provided 
housing unless the housing is up to 
par and available." 

Moving and unfinished rooms 
aren't the only problems students 
experience when it comes to on- 
campus living. One student suggests 
there should be more help available 
for on-campus students. 

Demarcus Mollette, junior nurs- 
ing major said, "I personally think 
that we need more housing and we 
need more RAs because we just need 
more than what we have." 

Mollette said he hasn't had a good 
experience with housing mainte- 
nance. 

"I understand that it is a large cam- 



pus, but I have to fill out two or three 
work order requests to get things 
fixed," Mollette added. 

Tremayne Freeman, junior elec- 
trical engineering major shares frus- 
tration with university housing. 
"The prices are way too high consid- 
ering what we get," Freeman said. 
"They overcharge you for things 
and if you don't check, they'll keep 
charging you." 

Finding a room on campus hasn't 
been a nightmare for everyone. A 
few enjoy the on-campus living ex- 
perience, including sophomore psy- 
chology major Brad Billeaudeau. 
who is satisfied with his room, and 
the perks on-campus living provides. 

"I like living on campus because 
there are no bills," Billeaudeau said. 
"You don't have to pay electricity 
bills and you don't have to worry 
about Internet. The cafeteria on 
campus makes it to where you don't 
have to go off campus to get food." 



Registrar's office issues new transcript policy 



Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

I he registrar's office recently 
changed its policy on request- ■ 
ing a transcript online. Students will 
now be subjected to only a paper 
copy for the price of $3.25. All free 
paper and digital copies have been 
discontinued. 

Previously students could receive 
a free transcript digitally and only 
had to pay a small fee to receive a 
paper copy. The charges included 
with the fee will include printing 
and mailing the transcripts to the 
students. 

Samantha Bourgeois, freshman 
biology major, has mixed feelings 
about the changes that have oc- 
curred through the registrar's office. 

"I personally don't know what to 
think about the new changes to the 
transcript request,"Bourgeois said. 
"I honestly feel that this new system 
may be a step to a better future, but 
I am also alarmed by the price of a 



piece of paper with our grades on it. 
They need to review this more be- 
fore putting a price of something so 
simple." 

There is still no charge for un- 
official transcripts that are available 
on NSUConnect. If a student has a 
financial obligation to the university, 
the balance must be paid in full be- 
fore the printing of an official or un- 
official transcript is done. 

Tyler Smith, sophomore account- 
ing major, feels that the new policy 
will only benefit the university not 
the student. 

"As coming from a student who 
isn't financially inclined, this new 
plan will not help the students but 
only give them one more thing to 
worry about," Smith said. "Having 
students pay $3.25 for one transcript 
is ridiculous and unheard of. If the 
university wants to charge for tran- 
scripts, a student should be allowed 
to get a certain amount of transcripts 
not just one," Smith said. 

Processing transcript requests at 
the end of a semester may take lon- 



ger. Students who only attended 
Northwestern State University prior 
to summer 1985 may obtain their 
official academic hard copy tran- 
script by submitting a written, dated 
and signed request. 

Students must complete an on- 
line transcript request located on the 
registrars office website. They then 
must print it out must be mailed or 
faxed the office. Cash, check or a 
money order will be accepted in 
the University Registrar's Office in 
Suite 308, Student Services Center 
for written transcript requests in ex- 
cess of two per semester. 

Charges must be paid in advance 
by faxing the MasterCard, Visa or 
American Express credit card in- 
formation to (318) 357-4257, or 
by mailing a check or money order 
to Northwestern State University, 
Student Accounts, P.O. Box 2419, 
Natchitoches, LA 71457-2419. 
Upon confirmation of your pay- 
ment, the transcript request will be 
processed. 



Wail Street journalist offers guidance to students 




Alumni Gary Fields spoke to 
communication students via 
Skype about the importance of 
volunteering for student media 
and internships. Fields empha- 
sized how his NSU education 
and experience played a criti- 
cal part in landing jobs at well- 
known publications such as 
USA Today, The Washington 
Post and presently, The Wall 
Street Journal. 



Photo by Gary Hardoman 
Fields encourages students to take advantage of resources. 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

64734° 



Thursday 

58734° 



Friday 

54730° 



Saturday 

49729° 



Sunday 

57735° 



Monday 

69749° 



Tuesday 

68742° 





Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
February 27, 2013 



KNWD finalizes DemonFest line-up 



Tara Luck 

KNWD Station Manager 



Have you been dying to 
find out which of your 
favorite local bands will 
perform at KNWD's De- 
monFest? 

Wait no longer! The line-up 
is finalized for Saturday, March 
23 event at the NSU Tailgating 
Field and includes excellent lo- 
cal talent. 

Matthew Dean, KNWD Mu- 
sic Director, has been working 
for months narrowing down the 
bands and feels confident in the 
bands selected for the festival. 

"'The bands chosen represent 
all the flavors of music local to 
Louisiana and they do it well," 
Dean said. 

True to Louisiana's wide va- 
riety of music, the genres of the 
bands range from jazz-fusion to 
alternative rock and metal. De- 
monFest starts with a pre-show 
at 11:30 a.m. featuring top hits 
from KNWD's popular radio 
show "Gamer Tracks." Bands 
begin at noon and end after the 
headliner, which starts at 7:30 
p.m. 

Headlining DemonFest is 
Shreveport band Super Water 
Sympathy (SWS). The majority 
of band members are NSU alums 
and cannot wait to come back to 
perform for their alma mater. 
"I have quite a soft spot for 




Photo submitted by Tara Luck 

KNWO's DemonFest takes place March 23 at the NSU Tailgating 
Field. Pictured above is DemonFest's headlining band, Super Water 
Sympathy, performing at 7:30 p.m. 



Natchitoches," Lead SWS sing- 
er and NSU theater department 
alumni. Ansley Hughes, said. "I 
love that place and I always will. 
As much as the city has given to 
me, I see the band as a way to 



give back to Natchitoches. It's 
not often that new things happen 
there so we'd like to be one of 
those 'new things.'" 

DemonFest was last held in 
Natchitoches on Front Streets in 



2006. James Mariano, News Di- 
rector for KNWD. emphasized 
the importance of celebrat- 
ing the history of live music in 
Natchitoches through Demon- 
Fest. 

"You hear of universities 
holding concerts and clearly [in 
the past] we did too because of 
the time Jim Croce came to play 
in Natchitoches back in 1973," 
Mariano said. "It's cool that we 
are bringing DemonFest back 
and bringing live music to this 
campus. Let's just hope this one 
goes better than Jim Croce's! 
Maybe one of the bands can play 
'Bad, Bad, Leroy Brown' in his 
memory.'" 

The KNWD staff.hopes that 
this event will become an an- 
nual occurrence and will grow 
to be a Louisiana version of the 
"Bonnaroo Music Festival" held 
every summer outside of Nash- 
ville, Tenn. The staff feels that 
DemonFest is a fun way to give 
back to Northwestern students 
and the Natchitoches commu- 
nity. 

DemonFest is free and open 
to the public. Northwestern stu- 
dent organizations will be on- 
site selling food and providing 
other activities such as picture 
opportunities and games. Atten- 
dants should feel free to bring 
a lawn chair or picnic blanket 
to come enjoy this spring after- 
noon event. 



The official line-up: 

11:30 a.m.- Gamer Tracks with DJ Taylor Furr 
[Natchitoches] (Video Game Music) 



Noon - Tajh Derosier and the Hybrid Groove 
[Natchitoches] (Jazz Fusion/Jazz) 

1 p.m.- Dufflebag Gang [Natchitoches] (Blues- 
based Alt. Rock) 

1 :30 p.m.- Terror at the Tea party [Olla] (Post- 
Hardcore/Metal-Core/ 
Electro-Core) 

2:30 p.m.- Chris Hamlett [Pineville] (Indie/Folk 
Rock, Experimental) 

3 p.m.- Engine [Shreveport] (Space Western / 
Caddo-American Folk Rock) 

4 p.m. - Carley5K Productions with Beauski 
[Alexandria] (Electronic/Hip-Hop/Rap) 

4:30 p.m. - Bears and Wolves [Shreveport] (Indie 
Rock/Ambient) 

5:30 p.m. - Chamber Tryouts [Shreveport] (Indie 
Experimental) 

6 p.m. - Dixie Tradition [Shreveport] (Rocking 
"Chrome and Skoal" Country) 

7 p.m. - Indian Giver [Shreveport] (Psychedelic 
Punk-Groove) 

7:30 p.m. - Super Water Sympathy [Shreveport] 
(Water Pop [synthesis of classic symphonic 
ambience with modern rock'n'roll anthems]) 



What lies to the side of your future home? 



- 1**V 



II 





is i fi in i tf us p 





The downtown area of the Disney-created town, Celebration, Fla., is a popular example of New Urbanism. 




When it 
comes to 
thinking 
about the future, 
everyone has 
certain things j acob La5utka 
that ^omm- StyleColumnist 
cally come 

to mind. For some it's living in a 
suburb with a spouse and chil- 
dren, while others dream of life 
on the farm and an adventurous 
few dare the subways and density 
of the big city. 

We all know (or think we 
know) what we want out of our 
futures, but do we ever stop to 
think about the implications of 
what we will need? You may 
want the pleasures of suburban 
life, but that doesn't mean you'll 
care to live in a stereotypical 
"sitcom suburb." 

The city is full of hustle and 
bustle, but it is not always so 
wonderful. I may want to go 
shopping and ask about breast 



augmentations in Beverly Hills, 
but that doesn't mean I want to 
spend two hours in Los Angeles 
traffic to get there. I also may 
want to drive downtown some- 
where, but I'd like to see serene 
and colorful roadway views 
instead of brown fields and bland 
industrial buildings on the way 
there. 

This leads me to my first 
point of contemplation: how will 
you get to where you want to go 
in your future? For example, if 
life in the suburbs seems attrac- 
tive, yet you like close ameni- 
ties and rapid public transit, you 
might want to reconsider your 
options. 

Transit networks are indeed 
extending into suburban areas, 
but the most convenient points of 
access will always be towards the 
heart of the city. 

With transit (whether by car. 
bus or train) comes the need to 
access necessities and amenities. 



When you come home from work 
every day and possibly want to 
buy fresh food from the market, 
an ideal environmentalist will 
not want to have to make several 
stops to do so. 

The solution, which can be 
found in most downtowns and 
some suburbs and small towns, is 
mixed-used development. Front 
Street in downtown Natchitoches 
is a local example of mixed-used 
development (unfortunately lack- 
ing a locally-owned market). A 
variety of businesses are placed 
along street level and most of the 
space above is residential (albeit 
quite expensive). 

A popular model of mixed- 
used development is known as 
New Urbanism. It plans for walk- 
able neighborhoods, maintains 
transit-oriented development, 
sustains an aesthetic natural 
environment and encourages a 
mixture of building uses. 

In an ideal New Urbanism 



Photo submitted by Jacob Labutka 

model, residents should not have 
to walk more than 1/4 of a mile 
away from their homes for basic 
daily necessities. In many cities 
with this model, fresh markets, 
bakeries and other amenities are 
located within reasonable walk- 
ing distance. 

The aesthetic component of 
New Urbanism brings to mind 
the kind of neighborhood you 
will want. There is something ex- 
citing about walking out onto to 
a vibrant street, but there is also 
something serene about garden 
views, small town architecture 
and chaotic city life far off in a 
skyscraper scene. It comes down 
to asking yourself what you want 
to wake up to in the morning. 

In truth, we hardly know 
where our lives might take us and 
where we will end up years from 
now. However. I merely seek to 
suggest that there are numerous 
factors that lie beneath one's 
future idyllic home. 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 



"Beautiful Creatures" 
Rated PG- 1 3 
4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

'Warm Bodies" 
Rated PG-1 3 
4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

"Warm Bodies" 
b Rated PG-1 3 

-£frg^.i. : --4;30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 




Student Media Leaders Needed 

Annual positions open starting summer 2013 

Argus Editor in Chief 

• Current Sauce Editor in Chief 

• Potpourri Editor in Chief 
KNWD General Manager 



Applications available for Potpourri and 
Current Sauce in Kyser Hall, RM 225 
Argus 316G or 316N 
KNWD 31 6D 



Deadline to submit: March 25 



Scholarships Available 



For more information, contact: 
Argus: Dr. Julie Kane, kanej@nsula.edu 
Current Sauce: Dr. Paula Furr, furrp@nsula.edu 
Potpourri: Stephanie Masson, massons@nsula.edu 
KNWD: Arther Dew, dewa@nsula.edu 



Ra 





pinions 



Catherine Beverly 

■ 

Opinions Editor 
c at . beve rly @yahoo. com 
February 27, 2013 



2013 Oscars controversy: MacFarlane goes too far? 



There seem to be a lot of 
differing opinions about 
Seth MacFarlane's brand 
of humor, as seen Sunday night at 
the 20 1 3 Oscars. There 
was a huge outcry as the 
Oscars went on; most of 
the clamoring was focused 
on the stereotypical insults 
MacFarlane directed 
towards some of the 
Academy's finest. 




write the jokes himself, he did have 
to approve them. 

The country is currently divided 
on issues of political correctness, 

something that could easily 
be seen in comments about 
MacFarlane's performance 
the day after. 

There were those who 
disapproved of his sexist 
and racist rambling; those 
who didn't mind the 



1 don't believe I am Cather,ne Beverly jokes bu{ the 
being overly sensitive Opinions Editor humor fell flat; and, 

finally, those who loved 
the boob songs and flu anecdotes. 

Personally, I have enjoyed 
comedy that calls on stereotypes, 
but only when those jokes are 
utilized to show how stupid those 



in my criticism of 
MacFarlane. 1 understand that some 
people enjoy his humor, but 1 don't 
think it was Oscar material 

Although many supporters 
comment on the fact that he didn't 



stereotypes can be. In Macfarlane's 
case, I have seen some of that in 
Family Guy. 

Although I'm not an avid 
watcher of the animated show, I 
have seen a few episodes and it is 
true that MacFarlane can use his 
sharp humor to reveal the stupidity 
behind some beliefs and social 
norms, but that didn't seem to 
transfer well to the format of the 
Oscars. 

Instead, we got a seemingly 
adolescent boy singing to some 
of the most talented people in the 
world about boobs. Boobs. Watch a 
clip of the song and you'll see that 
everyone is very removed from the 
performance. If the audience isn't 
laughing, you have a problem. 



Some commentators went so 
far as to say the reactions of the 
actresses were staged to make the 
joke funnier, but how far can you 
carry a theory before you a grasping 
at straws? 

It didn't stop there, next were 
the jokes about George Clooney 
dating younger women that went 
as far as to offer up Louisiana- 
native and 9 year old Quvenzhane 
Wallis, nominated Best Actress, as a 
potential mate. 

(On an off note. The Onion also 
tweeted this about the young starlet: 
"Everyone else seems afraid to say 
it, but that Quvenzhane Wallis is 
kind of a cunt, right? #Oscars2013" 
It seems like no one is safe for the 
sake of a flat joke.) 



The night went on, some people 
interested in the snarky comedy of 
MacFarlane. some people streaming 
posts about his disrespectful humor, 
but a word hasn't been spoken by 
those responsible for putting on the 
Oscars. 

I'm not sure we'll ever get a 
response on the matter from the 
Oscars, as they have to stand by 
their man to a point, but eventually 
the fans might come to an 
agreement. 

While many media outlets 
crucified MacFarlane for his 
degrading jokes, one of them 
involving women throwing up to 
look more beautiful in their dresses, 
commentators seemed to disagree 
with the writers. 



I agree that MacFarlane had a 
very smooth style of presenting. His 
lack of nervousness in performing 
and his interesting tone of voice 
definitely contributed a unique flair, 
but he seemed perpetually planted 
on the fine line between humor and 
degradation. 

It seems we've gotten to the 
point as a country that saying 
these is a kind of liberating for us. 
Look at it like saying a particularly 
inappropriate curse word. Saying 
these things is frowned upon to the 
point that reveling in the humor 
brings a strange thrill of pleasure 
at the ability to demean and mock 
people in the name of a joke. 




'Romeo and Juliet' rises again 
Rating: < 



• ooo 

Annie Desoto-Buras 

Guest columnist 

What would the aftermath of 
the zombie apocalypse be 
like? Well, according to 
Warm Bodies, it would be slightly 
less terrifying than previously 
believed. 

Apparently the rise of the 
undead would be surprisingly like 



Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet 
except with, you know, a little more 
brain eating. 

R (Nicholas Hoult) is a zombie 
with a problem. That problem is 
that, unlike so many of his undead 
brethren, R is still sentient and is 
torn about his need to eat the living. 

After eating the brain of Perry 
(Dave Franco), R falls in love with 
Perry's girlfriend Julie (Teresa 
Palmer) and rescues her from the 



rest of his undead comrades. 

Over the course of a few days 
inside his home in an abandoned 
airplane, the two grow closer and 
Julie learns that not all corpses are 
thoughtless killers. 

The two confront the rest of the 
zombies in the course of returning 
Julie to her home inside the 
human compound, and the unity 
between a corpse and the daughter 
of the human commander sparks 
something in R's friend M. 

This change becomes something 
of an epidemic among the undead 
community, leading the newly- 
conscious corpses to go seeking a 
peace with the humans while being 
pursued by the Bonies, skeletal 
undead who have given up the hope 
that now drives the others. 

With a Bony horde approaching 
the compound and a corpse army 
willing to fight on the side of the 



living, it is up to R and Julie, along 
with Julie's friend Nora, to convince 
Julie's anti-zombie father that not 
all undead are created equal. 

Despite the fact that it uses two 
familiar concepts, Warm Bodies 
combines them into something that 
is pretty entertaining and fresh. 

It obviously doesn't follow the 
exact story arc of Romeo and Juliet, 
though there are some obvious 
allusions to that work (check out the 
balcony scene), and despite the fact 
that there is some juicy brain eating 
on offer, it shows a different side to 
the undead than that to which we 
have become accustomed. 

While not Oscar-material, Warm 
Bodies is an entertaining way to 
spend a couple of hours. For added 
enjoyment, go see it with some 
friends; not only can you all laugh 
and flinch together, but as R himself 
attests, it's safer to travel in packs. 




Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 


Andrea Nederostova 

Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 

Adviser 


Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 

News Editor 


Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 


Alexis Reliford 

Life Editor 


Chris Degeyter 

Sauce Reporter 


Jimmie Walker 

Sports Editor 


Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 


Catherine Beverly 

Opinions Editor 


JC Bryant 

Social Media 


Kirstie White 

Copy Editor 


Camille Mosley 

Freshman Scholar 


Jacob Labutka 

Lifestyle Columnist 


Taylor Furr 

Delivery Personnel 



Office phone 
318-357-5456 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



ACROSS 

1 Pickle 
holder 

4 React in 
horror 

8 Anything 
but that 

t2 Past 

t3 Concept 

XA StroB 

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sized dog 

17 Without 
acting 

18 To-do list 

19 Every las? 
crumb 

2t Stimpy's 

cartoon pal 
22 Lassie, e.g 
26 Pavarorto's 
range 

29 A mere 
handful 

30 Toss in 

31 Nerve cell 
process 

32 Carte lead-in 

33 Turned blue? 

34 Gas slat 

35 Wall climber 

36 Deep-vcHceO 
anger 

37 'French* dog 

39 Srrtner's 
cnapeau 

40 *- the fields 
we go ..." 

41 AntK-ekJeriy 
prejudice 

45 Satchmo's 

genre 
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for one 
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wither 
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thai went 
under in 
2001 

□efjressed 
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competitor 
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33 


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35 


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36 


Sires 


38 


Doughnut 




srsop 




purchase 


39 


Capacitance 




measure 


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Poetic loot 


43 


Insult 


44 


Note to self 


45 


Van Ey<* or 




Vermeer 


46 


Milwaukee 




product 


47 




49 


Hostel 





Our newspaper 
needs stories written 
by students. Come 
by our office, 227 
Kyser, if you would 
like to join. 

Meetings every 
Monday at 4:00 p.m. 

We hope to hear 
from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



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If we s*e a light at 
the end of the tunnel, 
it is the light o< an 
oncoming tram. 
• Robert Lowell 



BUT TRUE 

By Samantbs Weaver 

■ h was screenwriter playwright, 
novelist, director and producer Ben 
Hecht who made the following sage 
observation; "Trying to determine 
what is going on m the world by read- 
ing newspapers is like eying to tell 



of a dock" 

• Those who study such things say 
thai the Earth spins faster on its axis 
in September than it does m March. 

• When the TV show T^ewrtchedT 
first started filming, the star, EUza- 
beth \tcffligomery. was just a month 
away from giving birth to her first 
child so the first five episodes were 
shot ahnost in their entirety without 
her. It wasn't until the baby was a few 
weeks old thai she was able to go est 
the set to film her scenes. 

■ If you 1 re a fan of the Beatles, you 
probably won't be surprised to learn 
that during the decade of the 1960s, 
they had more top 10 hits and more 
No. 1 records than any other record- 
ing arast 

• Before the June 1944 invasion of 
Normandy, a crossword puzzle dot 
was pruned in the London Daily Tele- 
graph contained the words "mulber- 
ry, 1 ' "Neptune," "OmahaC » 'overtoctf" 
and ^Utah." That may not seem to be 
a feet of much interest bttHtnms out 
that those were all secret code words 
used by the Allied military in plan- 
ning the lapcornmg offensive. The 
puzzle's aether, a schoolteacher, was 
tracked down and BKerrogated. but 
the puzzle s content was utamateh- 
chalked op to coincidence. 

• The country's first pay phone was 
installed ina bank m Hartford, Conn. 
in 18®. It costs cents to place a call, 
the eojnvalent of 51 -25 today 

pit 

Thought for the Day: '-'Whoever ss 
careless with the truth in small mat- 
ters cannot be trusted with important 
— J&mEinsirin 

©2615 \LwfTt*U*a3f*A, fee 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 

The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 

Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 

All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
February 27, 2013 




Submitted photo 

Basketball head coach Mike McConathy has 571 career wins. This season, his Demon team co-leads the Southland Conference. 

The McConathy Magic 

McConathy earns spot on Southland's All-Decade Team for the 1970s 

Courtsey of Sports Info: 



Northwestern State's Mike 
McConathy is on the verge 
of becoming the winningest 
men's basketball coach in state his- 
tory, but Monday he was honored for 
his incredible playing career at Loui- 
siana Tech when he was included on 
the 20-man Southland Conference 
All-Decade Team for the 1970s. 

McConathy has 571 career vic- 
tories in 30 seasons as a head coach 
heading into the Demons' contest 
Saturday night at 6 at Stephen F. 
Austin in a matchup of the co-lead- 
ers in the conference standings. The 
winner will have a one-game lead 
with two home games remaining 
March 7 and 9. 

Grambling's Fred Hobdy had 572 
career wins in 30 seasons as the Ti- 
gers' coach and is in the Louisiana 
Sports Hall of Fame. McConathy 
won 352 games in 16 seasons after 



starting the program at Bossier Par- 
ish Community College, and has 2 1 9 
wins in 14 years at Northwestern. 

The Southland, as part of its year- 
long 50th anniversary commemora- 
tion, is announcing all-decade teams 
in basketball over the last two weeks 
of the regular season. The 1970s 
team includes McConathy and three 
Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame mem- 
bers: Dwight "Bo" Lamar and An- 
drew Toney of Louisiana-Lafayette, 
and Louisiana Tech's Mike Green. 

McConathy was a three-year All- 
Southland guard who averaged 20.7 
points per game in his career, scor- 
ing 2,033 points in 98 games. He 
was the 1975-76 Southland Player 
of the Year while averaging 24.7 per 
game (13th nationally) and leading 
Louisiana Tech, coached by NSU 
alumnus Emmett Hendricks, to the 
conference championship in his ju- 
nior season. 



As a senior, he had a 27.5 scor- 
ing average, seventh-best in the na- 
tion, was chosen to play in the Big 
Apple All-Star Classic and became a 
fourth-round draft pick of the NBA's 
Chicago Bulls. He was released on 
the final round of cuts, briefly played 
professionally in Europe, and re- 
turned home to marry his wife Con- 
nie and begin his coaching career. 

A four-year starter, McConathy 
still holds Louisiana Tech school re- 
cords for free throws made in a game 
(19), season (200) and career (465) 
and ranks 10th in Southland history 
in career scoring. 

His career scoring high was 47 
at Lamar in his junior year, one of 
six games in which he scored 40 or 
more. Two came against Northwest- 
ern, where his father and two uncles 
starred in the 1950s. 

Basketball greats such as Lamar. 
Green, Toney, Robert Parish, Joe 
Dumars, Karl Malone and Calvin 



Natt have visited Prather Coliseum, 
which opened in 1964. But despite 
the stars who have come calling, 
McConathy holds the Prather single- 
game scoring record with 45 as on 
Dec. 11, 1976, when he shot 16 of 
26 from the field and sank 13 of 15 
free throws. 

Two of McConathy's college 
teammates made the team. Lanky 
Wells was, like McConathy, a three- 
time All-Southland selection from 
1973-77. 

Wells joined McConathy's staff at 
NSU for two seasons before gradu- 
ating from NSU in 2010 and re- 
mains an avid supporter of the NSU 
program as an unofficial chaplain. 
Victor King ( 1 975-79) also made the 
Southland's All- 1970s team. 

The Southland will announce the 
1980s teams for women's and men's 
basketball this week, and the men's 
and women's teams for the 1990s 
and the 2000s next week. 



Lady Demon softball improves with facilities 

Bailee Cartwright 

Sauce Reporter 



The Lady Demon softball team 
no longer travels in station 
wagons to games or plays on 
city complexes. But they do contin- 
ue to share the same traditions with 
the first NSU softball team of 1979. 

Today, the NSU softball team 
travels in charter buses with a full- 
paid coaching staff and the opportu- 
nity to earn full athletic scholarships. 
The softball department is continu- 
ing to improve for this 15-member 
team. 

Senior pitcher Brooke Boen- 
ing, fourth-year team member, has 
battled injuries this past year, but is 
now healthy and ready to make this 
season her best. Much advancement 
was made since her freshmen year, 
and she believes that this will pave 
the way for the team's success. 

"I think the upgrades to the soft- 
ball department have brought more 
enthusiasm and a better atmosphere 



to our team," Boening said. 
Some of the advancements include 
a renovated locker room, more ap- 
parel and tutoring services available 
in Student Academic Center. 

A current renovation is the "Vision 
of the Future" softball complex proj- 
ect. It is entirely funded by private 
support and NSU student facility im- 
provement fees. The advancements 
will include chair-backed seating, a 
partially covered grandstand and a 
new press box. 

Lynne Roberts, who played on 
the first NSU softball team in 1979, 
is excited about the new upgrades. 
She was one of the team's biggest 
fans when her daughter, alumni Sa- 
mantha Roberts, also played for the 
softball team for the past four years. 

"The game has changed since 
I played," Roberts said. "There is 
more talent and softball is a faster- 
paced game." 

However, some traditions still 
remain the same on the NSU soft- 
ball team such as the apparel and the 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Cassandra Barefield prepares to drill a pitch . She lead the 
team with eight home runs as a freshman last season. 



color scheme. 

"Our uniforms then were still the 
traditional school colors," Roberts 
said. "We wore pants and accented 
orange just like the NSU softball 
team currently does." 

The softball team has also main- 
tained special game traditions 
throughout the years. 

"Traditions that have always been 



a part of the softball program is the 
'Fork Em' sign after the pledge of 
allegiance and team dinners before 
and after games," Boening said. 

"My goal to make season this dif- 
ferent form the rest is to win confer- 
ence, establish a name for ourselves 
and gain respect throughout the ath- 
letic community," senior player Jor- 
dan Palmer said. 




Lady Demons 
take down UNO 




Andrea Nedorostova 

Staff Reporter 

The Lady Demon Basketball 
team won a non-conference 
home game against the Uni- 
versity of New Orleans. Lady De- 
mons overcame Lady Privateers 63- 
50 in Prather Coliseum. 

The best shooter of the game was 
Keri Thomas from University of 
New Orleans who scored 26 points. 
Her teammate Mirjam Sipos added 
16 points but it was not enough to 
defeat Lady Demons. 

Keisha Lee and Janelle Perez 
from Northwestern State had the 
highest success from NSU team as 
they both scored 14 points while a 
senior Jasmine Upchurch did not 
stay behind and scored 12 points to 
help the Demons beat New Orleans 
by the difference of 13 points. Jas- 
mine Bradley also performed very 
well for Demons as she ended with 
12 boards. 

The Lady Demons started the 
match with a 5-0 lead. Lady Priva- 
teers answered to that by taking their 
largest lead of the game (3) 12-17. 
That was also the last time that UNO 
was up. NSU dominated for the rest 
of the half (37-27) and for the rest of 



the game. 

"I think we shot the ball great 
but did not play good defense like 
we wanted to," Jasmine Upchurch. 
senior radiology major, said. 

Upchurch is one of the three se- 
niors on the team. 

"I try not to think about my 
season ending and try to keep con- 
tinue leading the team like a senior 
should," Upchurch said. 

NSU's current conference record 
is 6-9 (11-15 overall). The Lady De- 
mons need to win one more confer- 
ence match in order to participate in 
the Southland Conference Tourna- 
ment that will be held in Katy, Texas 
by the end of the season. 

NSU will play the last three 
conference matches in the next two 
weeks. Their opponents will be Ste- 
phen F. Austin, Corpus Christi and 
Sam Houston State. The last two 
matches will be played in Prather 
Coliseum. 

"1 know that we are going to 
make the tournament, and hopefully 
we will get that win Saturday against 
Stephen F. Austin," Upchurch said. 

The next conference match against 
SFA will be played in Saturday at 4 
p.m. in Nacogdoches, Texas at the 
William R. Johnson Coliseum. 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Freshman guard Janelle Perez drives past the UNO defender. 

Demons grab rubber match 
against UTPS on two big innings 



Courtsey of Sports Info: 

Down 3-0 early, the Northwest- 
ern State offense outscored 
Texas-Pan American 10-1 
Sunday afternoon to give the De- 
mons a 10-3 victory in Sunday after- 
noon's rubber match. 

NSU (5-2) scored three runs in 
the fourth inning to tie the game, and 
then added seven in the sixth frame 
to put the game out of reach for the 
Broncs (2-5). 

"You set out to win every series 
you play, and our guys did that af- 
ter a rough one Friday night," said 
first-year head baseball coach Lane 
Burroughs. "Our guys showed some 
toughness winning yesterday and to- 
day." 

UTPA scored three runs in the first 
two innings, but a three-run surge 
that started with Nick Purdy's single 
to left field got the Demons going. 

After Purdy's single to left field, 
Matt Baca lined one to right field 
and Edwin Gomez walked. Todd 
Wallace knocked in all of them on a 
double down the left field line. 

Northwestern State continued 
the surge in the sixth that opened up 
with Cort Brinson's single down the 
middle and a wild pitch that sent him 
to second. Nathan Lyons reached 
on a fielder's choice when Broncs' 
shortstop Shane Klemcke's throw to 
third base went awry. 

Matt Farmer had crucial pinch-hit 
down the left field line that scored 



both base runners, and then was sub- 
stituted for Matt Burns who came 
in to pinch-run. Garrett Killgore 
walked and Will Watson laid down a 
sacrifice bunt to move both Killgore 
and Burns into scoring position. 

"Matt Farmer had a big pinch-hit 
two-run double. That's what you ask 
for when you ask a guy to come off 
the bench," said Burroughs. "Left- 
handers were hitting good off their 
pitcher and we felt like that was a 
good matchup, and Farmer deliv- 
ered." 

Purdy was intentionally walked 
to load the bases when Baca hit a 
dribbler to Alberto Morales who 
attempted to throw out Burns at 
home, but the throw was high and 
Burns and Killgore both scored. 
Gomez lined a double to left field to 
score Purdy and Baca. Brinson later 
knocked Gomez in on a sacrifice fly. 

"We did capitalize on their errors, 
but that's what good teams do," said 
Burroughs. "Good teams find a way 
to push runs across the board any 
way possible." 

Andrew Adams started on the 
mound for the Demons, but gave 
up three runs in one-plus innings 
pitched. A.J. Funk came in and 
worked four shutout innings and 
allowed only one hit and one walk 
with four strikeouts. 



For complete story, 
visit nsudemons.com 




The 




u rrent 



Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, March 6, 2013 « Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦Volume 98: Issue 17 



Long time band director retires 



Camille Mosley 

Sauce Reporter 

Northwestern is renowned 
for its award winning music 
and theater program. Many 
musicians and performers 
have walked through the Creative 
and Performing Arts (CAPA) build- 
ings and come out as legends in 
the industry. Bill Brent, Director of 
Bands, has marched many to suc- 
cess. 

Brent started working at North- 
western in 1 984, where he took a 
meager 48-person band and made 
it into a prestigious, nationally- 
acclaimed 300-person band. In the 
time span of his career here. Brent 
has won dozens of awards, includ- 
ing being recently inducted into 
the Louisiana Hall of Fame and the 
American Bandmasters Association. 

In 2007, he was inducted into 
the Louisiana Music Educators 
Association Hall of Fame. Brent re- 
ceived the President's Distinguished 
Service Award in recognition of his 
work at Northwestern in 2002. 



Northwestern's band was named one 
of the top eight in the country by the 
Web site collegeotr.com in 2008. In 
2008, Brent received the Outstand- 
ing Bandmaster Award for the state 
of Louisiana from the Epsilon Chap- 
ter of Phi Beta Mu, International 
Bandmasters Fraternity. 

The band was a finalist for the 
201 1 Sudler Trophy, an award to 
identify and recognize collegiate 
marching bands of particular excel- 
lence that have made outstanding 
contributions to the American way 
of life. 

NSU's band started 201 1 by 
participating in the New Year's Day 
Parade and Festival in London. 

With all of his achievements and 
29 years of service. Brent has decid- 
ed to step down as director of NSU's 
marching band and pass the torch on 
to Jeffrey C. Matthews, director of 
summer music classes and conduc- 
tor of the NSU Wind Ensemble and 
Symphony Band. 

"I want to sincerely thank Dr. 
Randall Webb and his administra- 
tion for their support for the past 1 7 



years and Dr. Robert Alost who was 
my boss prior to Dr. Webb, for his 
support as well,"Brent said. "It has 
been a w onderful time for me and I 
feel that the program will continue 
to thrive under the leadership of Dr. 
Mathews." 

David Cantera, freshman music 
major, was in the marching band this 
year. 

He played the French horn for the 
Spirit of Northwestern . 

"He's a great person who really 
cares about his students," Cantera 
said. "Despite his busy schedule, he 
takes his time to really get to know 
his students." 

"I know he really loves us, and 
I'm really going to miss him," 
Cantera said. "Most band students 
see Mr. Brent as more of a fatherly 
figure because he looks out for his 
students and helps them in any way 
he possibly can!" 

Brent was nominated for the 
Louisiana Music Hall of Fame. 
Brent will recieve his plaque, Sat- 
urday, March 31, at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Natchitoches Jazz R & B Festival. 





Photo by Gary Hardoman 
Above: Brent has been at NSU for 29 years. In his time at NSU, 
he increased the number of bandmembers from 48 to over 300. 
The band was a finalist for the 2011 Sudler Trophy, an award to 
acknowledge collegiate marching bands. The band was named 
one of the top eight in the country by the web site collegeotr. 
com . 

Pictured left: Brent was awarded with two major honors recog- 
nizing his achievements at Northwestern State. Brent was nomi- 
nated for the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame by Natchitoches attor- 
ney Rodney Harrington. Brent will recieve his plaque, Saturday, 
March 31, at 7:30 p.m. at the Natchitoches Jazz R & B Festival. 



Upcoming Events 

Softball vs. Louisiana 
Tech 

NSU Softball Complex 
12:30 p.m 
March 3 

NSU Wind Symphony 
Magale Recital Hail 
7:30 p.m. 
March 4 

Stand for Freedom 
Kyser Hall 
11 a.m. 
March 5 

NSU Chamber Choir 
Magale Recital Hall 
7:30 p.m. 
March 5 

Women's basketball 
vs. Texas A&M - Cor- 
pus Christi 
Prather Coliseum 
5:30 p.m. 
March 7 

Brainy Acts Poetry So- 
ciety Poetry Slam 
Friedman Student 
Union Ballroom 
7 p.m. 
March 7 

Men's basketball vs. 

Texas 
A&M - Corpus Christi, 
Prather Coliseum 
7:30 p.m. 
March 7 




Submitted Photo 

KNWD will begin online streaming by the end of the month. 

KNWD hits the web 



Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 

KNWD the Demon is no lon- 
ger restricted to the radio. 
Northwestern's radio station 
should be streaming online by the 
end of the month on SHOUTcast 
radio. 

Live streaming will allow 
everything to be heard in real time 
and Luck intends for streaming at all 
hours. 

SHOUTcast is the internet radio 



site that will be hosting KNWD and 
can be streamed from computers and 
also has an iPhone and Android app 
for streaming on the go. With this ad- 
dition KNWD will be heard farther 
than ever before. Online streaming 
has been planned since Tara Luck 
became general manager last year. 
Streaming could have started sooner 
but Luck admitted that this project 
has been more difficult than antici- 
pated. 

Daniel Thiels, news reporter for 
KNWD, has been hard at work try- 



ing to set up the stream. 

"We just got new comput- 
ers which we needed for a while," 
Thiels said. "We needed a computer 
strictly for streaming the audio. We 
also got software which encodes the 
audio into digital for to stream." 

The final step of the process in- 
volves obtaining a server in order 
to stream online. SHOUTcast won't 
be the station's first time online. 
KNWD has recordings on Sound- 
cloud. com. Links to this site can be 
found at KNWD's Facebook and 
Orgsync pages. Soundcloud can be 
accessed via mobile device. 

Future plans for the station in- 
clude a small recording studio that 
would allow local bands to record 
songs. The recording studio would 
allow radio artists to prerecord their 
shows to be put on air or online at 
a later time. Thiels said with new 
equipment, KNWD is moving to- 
wards becoming a media outlet that 
fits modern day radio standards. 

As news reporter Thiels intends 
to increase his online presence by 
posting news, he will also have any 
special segments available online for 
students to hear at any time. 

Even though KNWD is finding a 
home on the internet, Luck still has 
faith in radio. 

"We believe it is still a thriv- 
ing media, but it is a media that is 
branching out to other playing de- 
vices," Luck said. 



SGA to hold representative meet and greet 

'Meet Your Representative Day!' 



Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 

Students will be able to speak 
with their senators at "Meet 
Your Representative Day." The 
event will take place at the Student 
Union Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 
1 p.m. 

Twenty-two senators will be cy- 
cling in and out during those hours 
listening and engaging the student 
body as students voice their ques- 
tions and concerns. 

The event is being organized by 
Student Affairs Committee co- 
chairs Kyla Winey and Lamario 
Fortson. There will also be pizza 
and prizes. 

Giveaways will include t-shirts, 
scantrons and more. 

"Meet Your Representative Day" 
has been harder to put together 
than the SGA would have thought. 
Winey admitted that the event was 
intended for last semester but had to 
be pushed back. 

"We came back this semester 
full force" Winey said. The union 
has been reserved and the t-shirts 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

58733° 



Thursday 

64734° 



Friday 

71750° 



Saturday 

69759° 



ordered. The hardest task is getting 
all 

22 senators to show up, especially 
w ith school going on." 

The goal is for students to come 
out and become involved with their 
student government. 

"We really want a lot of students 
to come, we are not going to bite 
we are just here for them. For the 
students," Fortson, committe co- 
chair said. 

Winey said that if 150 students 
drop by then it w ill have been a suc- 
cess in her eyes. This isn't the first 
this event has taken place but it has 
been a while. 

During SGA week, there was 
a similar event but Fortson said it 
didn't go well and there was not 
much publicity for it. 

To increase awareness, SGA has 
a few more events planned after this 
one. 

There will be a poetry slam in 
April and there is talks of a possible 
fashion show. Fortson would like 
for senators to visit residence halls 
to encourage other students to get 
involved with SGA. 

"People need to know what's 



going on with SGA," Fortson said. 
"They need to know what's going 
on, who we are and what we do." 

Winey said student affairs meet- 
ings are open to the public. They 
discuss anything that directly affects 
the students. The meetings are 
Wednesdays at 2. p.m. 

Meet Your Representatives 
Day is Wednesday at the Student 
Union from 10 a.m.-l p.m. Students 
can stop by to see what SGA is all 
about. 




Sunday 

67749° 



Monday 

60741° 



Tuesday 

68744° 





Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 

March 6, 2013 



NSU TV returns with 'Demon Life' shows 



Jessica Blow 

Staff Writer 



6 ^f~\ "Oh, I love it," NSU 
V-/ TV executive producer 
and director David 
Antilley said. Antilley has been 
working as executive producer 
and director since 1991. 

"Everyday I come to work, 
it's something new." Antilley 
said. "My job is not boring. I 
might be at Prather Coliseum 
setting up for a basketball game. 
A. A. Fredericks for Lady of the 
Bracelet, here in the studio or 
teaching students how to edit 
footage. I don't have a set 
schedule." 

Since the journalism depart- 
ment no longer exists, students 
are now required to take commu- 
nications courses in its place. 

According to Antilley this is 
the only difficulty he has encoun- 
tered so far. Fewer classes are 
offered that are geared towards 
working with television. Before, 
there were classes that allowed 
students to work more with NSU 
TV. 

The television and directing 
class gives students a chance to 
work behind the scenes with 
studio cameras, audio equipment 
and other technologies. Antilley 
teaches both classes with finished 
products shown on NSU TV. 



"Demon Life," a NSU TV 
show is hosted by the students of 
a television news-writing course 
taught by Arthur Dew. For "De- 
mon Life" students create their 
own news packages and discuss 
various topics. 

Angelica Kotun, senior mass 
communications major, is cur- 
rently enrolled in this class. She 
is now in the process of editing 
her first news package for the 
class, but it's not her first time 
editing. This will be the first time 
Kotun's news package airs on 
NSU TV. 

"I plan to start out in radio 
and gradually work my way up to 
sports broadcasting television," 
Kotun said. "And these skills will 
help me gain experience and 
knowledge." 

Kyla Winey also takes the 
course, and she is one of new 
NSU TV news anchors. She audi- 
tioned and received this position 
earlier this spring. 

"I am really excited to be 
working with the television 
crew," Winey said. "Everyone is 
very encouraging. Even when we 
make mistakes David Antilley is 
very kind and easy to talk to." 

Winey previously worked 
with a weekly radio show in La- 
fayette called "Holla Back" when 
she was 16-years-old. 

"I've never worked on televi- 




Photo by Jessica Blow 

Instructor David Antilley, NSU TV's executive producer and director, helps junior Victoria Hippler prepare for 
an upcoming NSU TV show. 



sion before but working on the 
radiowill help me as an anchor, 
Winey said. 

Winey added that working 



with radio allowed her to broaden 
her speaking skills and project 
her voice. She prepared for her 
anchor position by attending the 



practices and keeping up with 
local and global news. 

"I really want to make a ca- 
reer of being a news anchor then 



ultimately having my own talk 
show." Winey said. "This experi- 
ence will help." 

Both Kotun and Winey will 
host a "Demon Life" segment. 

Along with news and De- 
mon Life, NSU TV airs athletic 
games. Lady of the Bracelet. 
SGA round-ups and other shows. 
In the past, news was just a 10 
minute segment with readers or 
a student reading information 
behind a desk. The news has now 
advanced to a full 30-minute 
show with sports, weather and 
news packages. 

Ora G. Williams is acknowl- 
edged as the pioneer for NSU 
TV. She was an English profes- 
sor who broadcasted lectures 
over television to the classrooms 
and dorm areas. The television 
studio is named after her. and her 
picture can be seen on the walls 
of the television studio. 

Students that are interested in 
getting involved with NSU TV 
can stop by Antilley's office in 
room 104A in Kyser Hall or 
audition for the news cast each 
semester. 

Catch "Demon Life" Tues- 
days and the news cast Thurs- 
days at 3:30 p.m. on channel 22 
for Sudden Link, 55 for CP Tel 
and Channel 8 in dorm areas. 
NSU TV can also be viewed on 
YouTube. 



Phi Mu hosts raffle for Children's Miracle Network 



Emily Frame 

Sauce Reporter 

For just $2 you can help 
support Children's Miracle 
Network Hospitals. 
Phi Mu Fraternity will raffle 
three spirit baskets on Tuesday, 
March 19 in the Friedman Stu- 
dent Union. All raffle proceeds 
will benefit CMN hospital, the 
fraternity's national philanthropy. 

Phi Mu members will sell 
tickets on the Kyser Hall Brick- 
way Thurday from 9 a.m. -2 p.m. 
They will also sell tickets in 
the Friedman Student Union on 
March 19 from 10 a.m. to noon. 
The tickets cost $2 each, and 
raffle winners will be announced 
on March 19 at 12:15 p.m. 

Winners will receive one of 
three themed baskets filled with 
beach, NSU or tailgating-themed 
items. Items include towels, 
gift cards, food and candy. 

Jessica Viator, philanthropy 
committee head for Phi Mu, 
organized 



the event. 

"I think that this will be a big 
success and help us reach our 
$5,000 goal for CMNH this se- 
mester," Viator said. "The alumni 
have contributed by giving dona- 
tions and buying tickets." 

Each member of Phi Mu is 
responsible for selling at least 15 
raffle tickets. 

Ryan Owens, senior, 
supports Phi Mu and 
their philanthropy. 

"The philanthro- 
is so close to my 
heart because I love 
children and I love 
what Children's Miracle 
Network does for them," 
Owens said. 

"I feel that the raffle is not 
only a very simple way to raise 
money for CMNH, but most 
importantly it is an event that 
extends beyond Natchitoches as 
girls can go to their hometowns 
and spread the word about how 
important CMNH is to many 
communities throughout the 




state," Sarah Durham, senior and 
Phi Mu alumna, said. 

Besides hosting events to 
raise money for their national 
philanthropy, Phi Mu also makes 
biannual visits to St. Francis 
Cabrini Hospital in Alexandria, 
the closest CMN hospital to the 
Kappa Iota Chapter. 

"I love going to the hospital 
visits at St. Francis Cabrini 
because I get to see the 
children that we raise all this 
money for," 

Morgan Dailey, sophomore, 
said. "It's great that we can 
raise so much for such a great 
cause, and then to see the impact 
we've made is such a blessing." 

The Kappa Iota chapter of 
Phi Mu raises more than $10,000 
each 

year for CMNH. Their other 
philanthropy events include 
sandwich 

sales. "Mudbugs for Miracles" 
crawfish sales and their annual 
"Vera Bradley Bingo." 




Photo by Emily Frame 

From left, Freshman Lauren Zachmann and sophomore Jessica Viator paint the rock in preparation for Phi 
Mu Fraternity's raffle for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals. 



The college student's quest for balance between work and play 

T 



Jacob Labutka 



I here 
certainly 
is merit 
in taking some 
time out of our 
hectic lives 
to enjoy time 
with friends St >' le Columnist 
or with our 
selves. 

On the flip side, there is also 
merit in designating time for 
intense academic study, unless 
you're majoring in party rockin' 
or pimping (I fear for the odors 
and sights on such a non-existent 
campus). 



It may seem obvious, but it 
can never be stressed enough that 
the most satisfying way to live 
one's life is through maintain- 
ing balance. Some times that's 
impossible when the work and 
drama of college life catches up 
to us. 

However, if your collegiate 
life is spent solely at a desk 
or dealing with overdramatic 
personal problems, then I for one 
would re-asses my course load or 
my peeps, respectively. 

There's nothing wrong with 
wanting a busy schedule. In fact, 
most are of the opinion that it 



is better to be busy than bored 
(which I wholeheartedly agree 
with). However, it's not necessar- 
ily healthy or personally con- 
ducive to be busy with just one 
thing. 

This brings a question to 
mind: Where do you draw the 
lines between being solely aca- 
demic, a partier and balanced 
between the two? 

Truth be told it's not the same 
for everyone. No one is going to 
spend the same amount of time 
doing calculus or writing a paper 
just like no one is going to do the 
same social activities. Schools 



like NSU often have tips for the 
college student who wants to 
succeed. One that is common in 
many schools is that for every 
one credit hour a student should 
spend two hours outside of class 
studying and doing homework. 

There may be a few students 
who adhere to that timeline, but 
most seem to laugh at the notion 
and dismiss it (I am no excep- 
tion). 

There may be some weeks 
where this amount of time is es- 
sential (i.e. writing term papers, 
conducting extensive research, 
studying for finals). However, 



if you take 18 credit hours, for 
example, by this logic you're 
supposed to spend 54 hours per 
week reviewing and preparing 
class materials. 

Personally, I think this is 
ludicrous. Yet. maybe there are 
people who need this much time 
(although I can't see how it's es- 
sential every week). 

However, with the necessity 
of sleep such a time frame does 
not allow for much of a social 
life. It seems that with so much 
time devoted only to school work 
students' brains might become 
fried like a KFC Chicken sand- 



wich (a sandwich comprised of 
two fried chickens patties instead 
of bread). 

It may sound like I'm coming 
from a monastery in Tibet, but 
balance is the essence of tran- 
quility. 

Some may spend more time 
being social, and others may 
stick more to the books. Some- 
times you can even be social and 
academic at the same time (i.e. 
productive but fun study groups). 

At the end of the day do what 
feels right, be the best kind of 
productive, and always remember 
make the most of college. 





pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
March 6, 2013 



Graduate school, financial aid: Now can I panic? 



A problem that I have stumbled 
upon in my search for post- 
graduation employ is the ris- 
ing cost of the master's degree. 

I say this generally, as 
I know some people are 
able to receive 
various fellowships and 
grants that lower the per- 
sonal cost. 

The thing that gets my 
goat is that a master's de- 

doe's not seem to have Catherine Beverly 

the same consider- Opinions Editor 
ations for its students. 

I hav elooked at a variety of con- 
siderably high-priced schools (rang- 




and I am beginning to panic about 
my options. 

As much as I would love to attend 
graduate school. I do not think 

there is anything I could do 
that would lower this cost. 
Obviously. I would work 
while studying for my mas- 
ter's, but even that is not set 
in stone. 

Schools seem to make 
little to no guarantees about 
job placement once you 
are accepted. 

These financial con- 
cerns are important for me, 
but normally they 

could be offset by the increased pay 



ing from S 1 7.000 to $60,000 a year), one would receive as a result of at- 



taining a master's 

degree. Sadly, in the liberal arts or 
social sciences, the 
difference between a having a bach- 
elor's and having a master's seems 
inconsequential. 

I could always apply my studies 
to teaching at a university, but at that 
point I would want to consider ob- 
taining a doctorate in lieu of a 
master's. 

Despite the huge commitment it 
is to apply for a doctorate's program 
as an undergraduate, it is one of the 
only ways to be given grants 
by the school. 

In some programs a student may 
earn a master's along with their doc- 
torate degree. 



Even if this was not very helpful 
to everyone, I am hoping there is 
another student out there that feels 
my anxiety about the future. 

I know some people are set on 
working and others are focused on 
continuing their education, but what- 
ever path you choose, the last few 
semesters at college seem to be fran- 
tic. 

I just hope for our sake that gradu- 
ate education in the 
humanities becomes more welcom- 
ing to us poor folks. 

Hey, maybe one day the U.S. will 
have free public higher education! 

Can you imagine getting a bill for 
just a few hundred dollars a 
semester? 



A girl's worst nightmare 



II recently got a haircut from a lo- 
cal place on South Drive. 

I live three and half hours 
away from my hometown where my 
usual hairstylist is located. I can't 
exactly drop everything and go get a 
haircut. I had to compromise. 

I had gone to this salon 
before the Christmas Festival 
here in town. My hair came 
out rather nicely, and as a 
satisfied customer would do 
in a foreign land, I decided 
that this was the new place 
for me. Before this haircut. 



lowed to really cut my hair, but 
trim it for maintenance every now 
and then. I remember going on 
vacation last year and freaking out 
because my hair was everywhere in 
the water and on my shoulders and I 
just had no clue what was 
happening. 

Well, if one couldn't 
guess, one of my biggest 
fears is a bad haircut. 
My hair is my pride and 
joy and definitely a key 
symbol of identifica- 
tion, so when I walked 




I hadn't gotten a haircut in Camille Mosley out the sa | on mis time 
at least a year. Freshman Scholar \ j ust about cried. The 



You see, one summer 
about two years ago, I participated in 
a wedding as a bridesmaid and was 
not allowed to cut my hair. The next 
day after the wedding I made an ap- 
pointment to get a summer haircut. 
I wouldn't say that it was a disaster, 
but it was definitely 
something. 

Prior to my haircut, jpiy hair's 
length grew -to'the tdpr a#rny chest 
area. I cut my hair to about an inch 
underneath my ears. It was pretty 
short. After that, I was not allowed 
to cut my hair the way I wanted to 
because I like to get creative. 

To my credit, though, 1 was tired 
of my heavy, thick and untamable 
mane. 

Anyway, after that, I was not al- 



hairdresser had cut my 
hair too short, in a weird jagged 
mess.while cutting my bangs way to 
short. They come to above my eye- 
brows. 

It's a horror. My hair itself doesn't 
look too bad, but now I look like an 
eighties mad scientist gone wrong. 

The only thing that can be done 
in this situation is to let my hair and 
bangs- grow out and pray that no one 
notices, which has been 
pretty successful so far seeing as 
how only three people have actually 
noticed without me telling them. 

The moral of this story is to stick 
with what you know, and don't 
mess up the status quo. 




MAGIC MAZE 


• 






II.VIM/ 1 

OPEN 





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Brazil nut 
Coconut 
Green banana 
Jamjar 


Letters 
Monthly bills 
Nail polish 
No 10 can 


Paint can Snack packs 
Pickle jar Walnut 
Pills Wine bottle 
Safe 


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All 'tqh!s reserved 





The 




u rrent 

auce 



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Life Editor 


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holder 
4 React in 
horror 
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but that 
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13 Concept 
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18 To-do list 

19 Every las? 
crumb 

21 Stmpy's 
cartoon pa* 

22 Lassie, e.g. 
26 Pavarattj's 

range 

29 A mere 
handful 

30 Toes in 

31 Nerve cell 
process 

32 Carte lead-in 

33 Turned blue? 

34 Gas slat 

35 Wall climber 

36 Deep-voiced 
singer 

3? 'French* dog 

39 Shfiner's 
cnapaau 

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we go ..." 

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• We need writers* 



Our newspaper needs stories written by stu- 
dents. Come by our office, 227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join. 

Meetings every Monday at 4:00 p.m. We 
hope to hear from you! 



Current Sauce staff 




'Jack the Giant Slayer': An Enjoyable Time Killer 

Rating: 



• ooo 

Annie Desoto-Buras 

Guest columnist 

Fairytales are making a 
comeback recently, specifically 
in the form of movies. 
"Jack and the Beanstalk" is a 
children's tale that has been 
but the newly-released and 
modernized "Jack the Giant 
Slayer" is by no means only for 
kids. 

With a new spin on the familiar 
story, good visual effects andy 
an entertaining cast, this is a film 
that anyone can enjoy. 

Jack (Nicholas Hoult) is a 
peasant lad w ith dreams of being 
one of the illustrious King's 
Guardians despite his lack of noble 
blood. Isabelle (Eleanor Tomlinson) 
is a princess who can trace her 
ancestryback to the legendary King 
Erik the Great, but is dissatisfied 
with her sheltered palace life. 

Both grow up with a taste for 
adventure cultivated by the bedtime 
story their parents read to them 
about monstrous giants and the 
brave warriors who banished them 
to a kingdom 
in the sky. 

As young adults adventure seems 
out of reach for both of 
them. Jack lives in poverty with an 
uncle who begrudges his dreamer's 
nature, while Isabelle's father 
King Brahmwell (Ian McShane) is 
forcing her into a marriage with his 
right-hand man Roderick (Stanley 
Tucci). With a turn of events 



excitement and adventure have 
never seemed quite so far away 
from either of them. Isabelle 
decides to run away from the castle 
to live her own life while Jack 
fails to sell a horse, which prompts 
Jack's uncle to storm off with the 
intention of pawning some of Jack's 
late parents' belongings. When _ — 
some beans (that were given to Jack 
from a monk) sprout unexpectedly 
and carry both Jack's cottage and 
the runaway princess, however, 
adventure seems to have found the 
two at last. 

Along with the King's 
Guardians, led by ElmcrnV(Ewan 
McGregor) Roderick and his toady, 
Jack reaches the land of the giants, 
where everyone except Jack is 
captured. While Elmont and Isabelle 
are slated to be eaten, Roderick 
becomes ruler of the giants and sets 
plans in place for an invasion of the 
land of men. 

When Roderick is killed by 
Elmont, the giants decide to 
continue in their quest to invade and 
destroy the humans' world, and it 
becomes even more urgent that Jack 
and Isabelle warn King Brahmwell 
of the impending attack. 

With giants on Jack's heels, a 
princess in his heart and adventure 
on his mind, will Jack be able to 
save the kingdom and find glory at 
last? 

Well, it's a family movie so 
yeah, he will. How will it come 
about? You'll have to go see "Jack 
and the Beanstalk" to find out. 




The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 



r .^Uj: ; ■ . ...... • 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 

March 6,2013 



NSU softball off to best start in history 



Brittany Russ 

Sauce Reporter 

The Northwestern State softball 
team made history Sunday, 
blanking Louisiana Tech 6-0 
and improving to a 17-3 overall re- 
cord, the best mark after 20 games in 
program history. The Lady Demons 
snapped the 21 -year record that was 
set in 1990 when NSU went 16-4 
under the direction of head coach 
Rickey McCallister. 

"We came out really strong today, 
and getting the win was the icing on 
the cake." said head coach Donald 
Pickett. "Breaking the record with 
17 wins in 20 games is something 
to be proud of, both from a coaching 
aspect and for the players." 

Senior Kylie Roos (5-0) threw a 
complete game striking out five and 
allowing just four hits as she faced 
25 batters on the day. 

The Lady Demons notched six 
RBI for six runs, including a solo 
home run by sophomore Brittany 
Virgoe, her third of the weekend and 
fourth of the season. 

NSU put up four runs in the fourth 
to put the Lady Techsters at an arm's 
length as Brianna Rodriguez led off 
the inning with a double to left field. 
Freshman Natalie Landry followed 
suit and switched places with Rodri- 
guez on a double to right center. 

Cheyenne DelaGarza kept the 
RBIs going with a single to center 
field, sending Landry home. 

Jordan Palmer walked and loaded 
up the bases for Shenequia Abby 
who reached first on a hard grounder 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Senior Kylie Roos pitches a strike against a Lady Techster batter. She threw a complete game and stuck out five batters in NSU's win over La Tech. 



up the third base line, causing third 
baseman Hailey Winter to commit 
an error and allowing two runs to 
score. 

The Lady Demons got on the 
board in the second as Cassandra 
Barefield doubled to center field and 
sent Landry home. 



DelaGarza led NSU as she went 
one-for-two and notched two RBI, 
followed by Landry going two-for- 
three with one RBI. 

The win was a rematch of the 
previous day's game, which resulted 
in a 4-3 loss handed to the Lady De- 
mons by Louisiana Tech. It was the 



team's first loss after a 10 game win 
streak. 

NSU defeated Alcorn State 10-3 
earlier in the day to earn the 10th 
win. 

"We had a really good day of- 
fensively, but overall we have some 
work to do," said head coach Donald 



Pickett. 

The Lady Demons notched 13 
RBI on 22 hits throughout the day 
as Brianna Rodriguez homered 
twice while Brittany Virgoe, Natalie 
Landry, and Cassandra Barefield had 
one homer each. 

NSU consistently picked up 



single runs throughout the contest 
with La Tech, but a big fifth inning 
by the Lady Techsters left the Lady 
Demons down by one and unable to 
score in the seventh. 

Kaylee Guidry (4- 1 ) came in for 
Brooke Boening (5-2) in the second 
inning, allowing one hit and striking 
out one. 

Against the Lady Tigers, NSU 
picked up runs in almost every in- 
ning, including homers by Virgoe 
and Landry in the sixth. 

The Lady Demons put three on 
the board in the first with Rodri- 
guez's first homer of the day as she 
picked up three RBI on the hit. 

NSU picked up three more scores 
in the second and cooled down in the 
third for a scoreless inning. 

Alcorn grabbed two runs in the 
fourth and another in the sixth, but 
the Lady Demons would not allow 
any more. 

Bay lee Gray (2-0) earned her sec- 
ond career victory as she threw six 
complete innings striking out seven 
and allowing six hits. 

Paige Cavallin (1-0) threw the 
seventh and final inning, striking out 
one batter. 

Rodriguez lead the Lady Demons 
from the plate with four hits and five 
RBI, followed by Virgoe with three 
hits and three RBI and Landry with 
four hits and two RBI. 

The Lady Demons open South- 
land Conference play on the road 
before coming home to host a series 
with Nicholls State on March 16th 
and 1 7th. 




Submitted photo 

Jan Frederick Courillion explains the table manners throughout the etiquette dinner. 

NSU athletes take etiquette lessons 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Staff Reporter 

TThe Northwestern State Ath- 
letic department goes beyond 
and above in its dedication for 
NSU athletes. 

Its focus is not merely on athletic 
results but also on academics, and 
most importantly, the athletic depart- 
ment cares for NSU athlete's future. 

The athletic department takes 
steps that may help many NSU 
student-athlete graduates to succeed 
in their career paths by offering them 
internships and networking opportu- 
nities. The closest opportunity for 
student-athletes is the etiquette din- 
ner that will be on Thursday, March 
21 in Prather Coliseum. Athletes are 
expected to follow the business ca- 
sual dress code. 

The etiquette dinner is an annual 



event offered to NSU student-ath- 
letes for the fourth consecutive year. 

"The etiquette dinner offers a 
unique networking opportunity that 
many of our athletes normally would 
not have because most of them are 
not from the area," Carrie Crowell, 
the Head Academic Coordinator for 
student-athletes said. "When they 
need to start meeting people in the 
industry that they want to get into, 
or look for internships, they really 
do not know who to find and where 
to find them other than on Google. 
At the etiquette dinner, our athletes 
learn how to interact with a business 
person over a meal because that is 
something they may have to do in 
the future, so we want to make sure 
they know how to properly do it." 

The athletic department asks stu- 
dent-athletes in advance what kind 
of professional they would like to 



Change creates postive vibe for baseball 

Bailee Cartwright 

Sauce Reporter 

Out with the old and in with 
the new is this year's baseball 
team strategy. The Demons' 
season with feature a new field, 
uniforms, and coaching staff. But 
the team's traditions and rituals that 
set them apart from the rest of the 
Southland Conference will remain. 

The new NSU head baseball 
coach is Lane Burroughs, former 
Mississippi State assistant coach. 
Senior player Will Watson, a three- 
year starter, loves the new coaching 
staff and thinks the players are now 
coming together as a team. 

"Our new coaches have really in- 
stilled a family atmosphere within us 
so we want to play as hard as we can 
for the person next to us," Watson 
said. "We are excited and ready to 
bring a championship back to NSU." 

The recently renovated baseball 
complex now has turf replacing 
the dirt and grass in the infield of 
the previous field. The team of 20 
newcomers and 10 returners also re- 
ceived new uniforms and apparel for 
this upcoming season. 



meet at the etiquette dinner. Based 
on responses, they try to invite peo- 
ple who work in these fields that ath- 
letes requested and they invite them. 

Approximately 45 student-ath- 
letes can participate at the etiquette 
dinner because it depends on how 
many professionals accept the in- 
vitation. Invited are local business 
professionals typically from Natchi- 
toches, Shreveport and Alexan- 
dria. Jan Frederick Courillion from 
Natchitoches community facilitates 
the etiquette dinner. 

Athletes are required to sign up 
for the etiquette dinner in advance 
because spots are limited. 

The etiquette dinner allows stu- 
dent-athletes to learn or refresh their 
table manners at a business lunch or 
dinner and they get a chance to net- 
work with people from the field of 
their career interest. 



91,7 FM 



The Demo 



of KNWD 





Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Toby Cornejo tags the runner and throws for another out on the play. 



Coach Burroughs, also Dugout 
Club coordinator, expressed his ex- 
citement about these improvements. 
A support group, the Dugout Club at 
NSU financially contributes to team 
facility advancements. 

Even though this team and de- 
partment have changed dramatically, 
some players still keep their same 
routines. 

"I always like to get on the field 
early after getting a good stretch 
from one of the trainers and hit 



fungo to my infielders to get a good 
sweat going before the pregame 
routines," red shirt junior Cameron 
Brewer said. 

Senior player Todd Wallace said 
each team member has his own way 
mentally and physically to prepare 
for the game. 

"I personally drink a monster 



For complete story 
visit nsucurrentsauce.com 



NSU finds referee problems at SFA 



Jalan West caught the ball and 
took a shot with less than four 
seconds left on the game 
clock. The game was lost 
before West even caught the ball, 
before the game clock ticked under 
four seconds. 

The game was lost the mo- 
ment the Demons 
stepped onto the 
court to face the 
Stephen F. Austin 
Lumberjacks. 

Supposedly, 
West missed the 
game w inning shot 
at the buzzer. West 
had no chance of 
winning the game 
with that shot. 

That fact was decided well be- 
fore he even tried. 

In the first half of the game, a 
technical foul was called on 
coach Mike McConathy. McCona- 
thy took no sort of action warrant- 
ing this call. In fact, coaches rarely 
take action warranting fouls called 
against them. A good indicator of a 
game's outcome takes place when 
a technical foul called on a coach. 
Technical fouls on coaches are 




Chris Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 



probably the most subjective calls 
a referee can make. If the coach ran 
onto the court and blocked a shot 
himself, a technical foul maybe 
called on the coach. But yelling at 
players is not a technical foul. Yell- 
ing is something every coach does 
for the entire duration of the game. 
Without a raised voice, coaches 
cannot communicate. 

Calling a technical foul on a 
coach for yelling is simply say- 
ing, "Your team is not supposed 
to win, so stop trying. Now we 
will let the other team take free 
shots to even things out." 
In the NBA playoff series 
between the Boston Celtics and the 
Miami Heat, in Miami, the referees 
called a technical foul on Celtics 
coach Doc Rivers. The rest of the 
game was entirely in Miami's favor. 

Several calls were made against 
the Demons in their game w ith 
Stephen F. Austin. Perhaps it's just 
chance. The chance factor goes 
away with the other human bias also 
fighting against the Demons. 

The Southland workers operating 
Stephen F. Austin's scoreboard 
also seemed to try getting away with 
several slights against the 



Demons by awarding three-point 
shots to the Lumberjacks instead 
of the Demons and forgetting to 
include at least two completed free 
throw shots. These problems were 
not fixed for minutes. 

None of the workers seemed in 
any rush to fix the problems until 
being informed by people on the 
Northwestern side. What if those 
errors hadn't been caught? The 
accident would never have been 
corrected. 

Human non-competitors will 
always drag sports into subjectivity. 
When that subjectivity becomes bla- 
tant bias, things need to be changed. 

People argue about controversial 
referee decisions. People cite 
conspiracies to keep a certain team 
from winning or to keep a certain 
team winning. Most of these people 
have little evidence. 

They talk from sheer emotion. 
And some people will say this falls 
in the same category. 

But the evidence shows that the 
supposedly unbiased workers of 
the Southland Conference in Nacog- 
doches, Texas that night were a 
little less than reputable. Touch- 
down Seahawks. 






like us on facebook @thecurrentsauce 



Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, March 20, 2013 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www. nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 18 



New aerobics 
class to get 
students fit 

"Honestly, whether or 
not my physical appear- 
ance has changed, I feel 
better about myself than 
I did before, " 

-Bailey Boles 

Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

fn the spirit of promoting 
healthy habits, the university is 
offering a new class this semester 
that's listed as HP 1660. It's also 
known as aerobics. 

The instructor is currently Paula 
Furr. It will be held every Monday 
and Wednesday from 2 p.m.-3:15 
pm. 

The class is geared towards exer- 
cising major muscle groups such as 
deltoids, pectorals, biceps, triceps, 
gluteals, quadriceps and obliques, 
but in an interesting way. 

It features low paced exercise 
that range from walking to dancing 
to up tempo songs that get the heart 
pumping and boody moving. 

Junior physical education major 
Jackson Arcneaux is happy that this 
course is offered and plans on tak- 
ing it next semester. 

"With the summer coming up 
and everyone wanting to get to their 
dream bod, this is a perfect oppur- 
tunity to work on getting toned and 
built up for the beach," Arceneaux 
said. 

HP 1660 is a two credit hour 
course that allows students to get fit 
while earning college credits that 
could be put towards their field of 
study. 

Eighty percent of the class work- 
ing out but does involve online as- 
signments and also in class quizzes 
that are based on body groups that 
the class is working on at that par- 
ticular time. 

Freshmen elementary education 
major. Bailey Boles, feels the dif- 
ference in her body and confidence 
level since she has joined the course. 

"It's given me more motivation 
to w ork out in and outside of class," 
Boles said. 

"Honestly, whether or not my 
physical appearance has changed, I 
feel better about myself than I did 
before," Boles said. 

Furr built her class on encour- 
aging students to become active. 
She plans on instructing follow up 
summer sessions and hopes for a 
bigger enrollement in the course for 
the fall. 

Sophomore secondary English 
major Danielle Koster feels that the 
class has given her a positive out- 
look on her health. 

"I have found a better way to 
stay fit and it's fun," Koster said. 

"It's not boring like just walk- 
ing around or cycling. I joined the 
class because I have tried many di- 
ets and they put me in the hospital 
my freshman year. Since I really 
wanted to lose weight the healthy 
way this I found out was the best 
way to do it," Koster said. 

For more information on health 
classes with credit options contact 
the Registrar's Office at 357-6171. 




Photo by Jimmie Walker 

According to whitehouse.gov, Louisiana is predicted to lose approximately $15.8 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting many jobs at risk. 




u ester to snip away at budgets 

Sequester may hit students where it hurts 



Chas Willson 

Sauce Reporter 

T 

| he sequester has been this 
ominous budget cut that 
will make a major impact on 
the nation, particularly students. 

The $86 billion sequester is the 
result of the federal government ap- 
proving a series of spending cuts to 
further balance the nations's bud- 
get. It was originally passed in the 
capital as part of the Budget Control 
Act in 20 ll as way to motivate the 
Joint Select Committee on Deficit 
Reduction, a committee comprised 
of both parties to cut SI. 5 trillion 



dollars from government spending. 

The committee did not accom- 
plish this goal so the sequester took 
effect as of March I, 20 13. The 
budget cut was split roughly around 
50-50 between military defense 
spending and domestic spending. 

On the domestic side, certain things 
stayed off the table and would not be 
affected by the sequester including: 
Medicaid, Social Security, welfare, 
and food stamps. Many other low in- 
come programs have been affected . 

Government programs will be 
terminated but the budget cut has 
taken roughly 2.14 million gov- 
ernment jobs nationwide and may 
make the job market very dif- 
ficult to navigate for soon-to-be 
graduates. Higher education will 



of be facing additional cuts also. 

For the 2013-2014 academic 
year, originating loan fees will rise 
in slight amounts. Work-study pro- 
grams are in danger of disappearing. 

Military branches have stopped 
accepting applications for tuition as- 
sistance to its active members for 
the month of March and are review- 
ing the budget for it. Pell grants are 
safe for this academic year but may 
be up for reductions for next year. 

One of the largely notable 
cuts is to the Teacher Educa- 
tion Assistance Grants and the 
Higher Education Grant in which 
both will see a 12.6 percent cut. 

Senior mass communication 
major Daniel Thiels said if there 
was less government interfer- 



ence, America may not be facing 
budgets cuts such as Sequester. 

"I feel that the whole sequester or- 
deal currently taking place is a great 
example of the dangers of relying on 
the federal government to fund such a 
vast array of operations," Thiels said. 

"Now that something has gone 
wrong in Washington, the entire 
country is facing across the board 
cuts. If we lessen the federal govern- 
ment's reach and give more control 
to the states, maybe we won't have to 
face these crises in the future. May- 
be this is just a lesson that we as a 
country have to learn the hard way." 

"Administration has been closely 
monitoring the situation in the Capi- 
tol," Greg Ross, NSU finanacial aid 
consultant, said. "Because they're 



going back and changing everything, 
we're not sure how students will be 
affected. They are not telling us not 
to change anything in procedures. 
They're just telling us they are in- 
creasing the the loan processing fee." 

Since March 1, there have been 
over 100 amendments proposed by 
the Senate to help lessen the sting of 
the cut. Because of those admend- 
ments, it makes it very difficult to 
keep track of significant changes. 

The sequester may not be 
the mega-apocalypse that waws 
expected back in February. 
President Obama has suggest- 
ed the the 2013 sequester to be 
replaced with a package of tax 
increases and spending cuts. 



Allergy season leaps into the new year 



Janell Parfait 

Sauce Reporter 

While the calendar may say 
that it is still wintertime, 
spring has made an early 
arrival in Natchitoches. As flowers 
begin to blossom and life re-emerges 
around campus, a wave of allergens 
is not far from the horizon. 

Allergy season occurs during 
the spring and fall when the weather 
shifts and new plants began bloom- 
ing. The cooler, drier air in the fall 
means that pollen and other particles 
can be more easily dispersed without 



any obstructions. According to pol- 
len. com, the pollen during the fall 
allergy season usually comes from 
plants that bloomed in the late sum- 
mer such as ragweed and golden rod. 
The spring allergy season, however, 
not only includes pollen, but also 
mold. 

"Spring showers and warmer air 
usually increase the humidity level, 
which produces the perfect environ- 
ment for mold," Stephanie Camp- 
bell, NSU Director of Health ser- 
vices, said. 

Campbell said allergic reactions 
are caused when the immune system 
overreacts to a foreign body such as 



pollen or dust. Histamine, an inflam- 
matory chemical, is then released. 
Histamine causes the typical allergic 
reactions such as itchy, watery eyes 
and a runny nose as a response to the 
allergens. 

Allergies do not discriminate and 
almost anyone is susceptible to hav- 
ing them. The Center for Disease 
Control reports that over 50 million 
Americans have some form of respi- 
ratory allergies and allergies are the 
sixth leading cause of chronic illness 
in the United States. 

"From a large number of people 
who visit the clinic, the biggest com- 
plaint is upper-respiratory related," 



Campbell said. "These complaints 
usually include colds, sinusitis, hay 
fever, and bronchitis." 

Campbell said allergies can be 
treated with an oral anti-histamine or 
an allergy shot if the case is severe. 
The strength and frequency of aller- 
gy shots, or immunotherapy, vary for 
each individual case since the serum 
can be customized. 

She encourages students with al- 
lergies to avoid anything that may 
trigger a reaction. This may mean 
commuting instead of walking 
through a wooded area or wearing 
a mask outdoors. The indoor envi- 
ronment should be as dust-free as 



possible and air-conditioner filters 
should be changed regularly. Mold 
can elimiinated with a 10 percent 
chlorine-bleach solution. 

The services at NSU's health clinic 
are free for all students with student 
insurance. 



NSU's Health Clinic 
Monday- Thursday 

7:30 a.m. -4 p.m. 
Friday 

7:30 a.m. - noon 

315 Caspari Street 

next to NSU Police Station 

318.357.5351 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

71741° 



Thursday 

69756° 



Friday 

77761° 



Saturday 

75760° 



Sunday 

68742° 



Monday 

65750° 



Tuesday 

66739° 





Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 
March 20, 2013 



Dorothy makes 
her way to 
Natchitoches 



Alexis Reliford 

Life Editor 

Dorothy is no longer in Kansas as she and Toto 
make their way to Northwestern State next 

week. 

With March 26 quickly approaching, NSU gears 
up for the annual letter-writing event, "Up 'til Dawn" 
><>sted by the Student Activities Board. 

Up 'til Dawn is a St. Jude collegiate fund raising 
; ogram on more than 1 80 campuses across the coun- 
try. The student-led and student-run program hosts 
.mailer events through out the school year leading up 
to the annual Up 'til Dawn event when the campus 
unites to write letters to friends and family asking 
hem to donate to St. Jude on their behalf. The Up 'til 
IJawn program educates students, faculty and commu- 
nity on St. Jude while raising money. 

According to executive director, senior Michael 
Stephenson more than 800 Northwestern State Univer- 
sity students will join together to fight cancer and help 
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital from 7 p.m. 
until 10 p.m. in Prather Coliseum. 

"By far, we have surpassed numbers from years 
past," Stephenson said. "I'm beyond excited to wel- 
ome so many people." From the event Stephenson 
hopes to raise $100,000 for St. Jude. 

Northwestern State has raised $88,000 for St. Jude 
hildren's Research Hospital since it came to the 
campus in 2009 and ranks as one of the top programs 
it) the region. 

The theme for this year's event is "There's No 
Place Like St. Jude." Those attending can receive free 
'bod, win door prizes, take part in a grand prize draw- 
ing, participate in contests and enjoy live entertain- 
ment. 

"I'm looking forward to helping raise money for 
a great cause and having fun with my teammates," 

sophomore Jocelyn Beaudion said. 

Several fund raising events were held throughout 
the year including a bake sale and a brick sale. 
Students were able to purchase yellow bricks with 
their names on them to be displayed on the yellow 
brick road at Up 'til Dawn. 

Keeping in touch with technology, the program 
committee also created a free smartphone app avail- 
able to students featuring a schedule for the night, as 
well as event updates. 

"It's bittersweet that I'm planning my last event," 
Stephenson said. "I'm so proud of my school and the 
dedicated students that unite for one night to help fight 
childhood cancer in a hope to find a cure." 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

t "The Call" 

4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

"21 and Over" 

4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

"The Incredible Burl Wonderstone" 

4:20 p.m. 7.00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

"Oz The Great and Powerful" 

4:10 p.m. 6:45 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"Jack the Giant Slayer" 

4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"Dark Skies' 

4:30 p.m. 7:10 [ 




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when it 5 
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Submitted Photo 



Cast members, from left, David Brumfield, Beau Wilson and Kwame Lilly rehearse for "West Side Story," premiering in A.A. Fredericks on March 20. 

Theater and dance department presents 

WGST SID£ STOBH 



Jessica Blow 

Staff Writer 

"When you're a Jet, 
you're a Jet all the way! 
from you first cigarette 
your last dyin' days!" 

That line comes from 
the well known musical 
"West Side Story," 
making its debut at NSU 
on Wednesday March 
20, at 7:30 p.m. in A.A. 
Fredericks Auditorium. 

"West Side Story," 
a musical written in the 
1950s retells the story of 
Shakespeare's "Romeo 
and Juliet." Instead of a 
story about a war between 
families, it's a war 
between two gangs-The 
white Jets and The Puerto 
Rican Sharks. Tony and 
Maria are the star-crossed 
lovers in the musical 
belonging to opposite 
gangs. 

Arthur Laurents 
originally wrote the 
musical, along with music 
by Leonard Bernstein 



and lyrics by Stephen 
Sondheim. 

NSU's Department 
of Theatre and Dance 
collaborated to create 
a musical that casts 
32 characters and a 
26-member orchestra. 
Douglas Bakenhus 
will conduct the 
the Natchitoches- 
Northwestern Symphony. 

Even though Laurents 
wrote "West Side Story," 
director Scott Burrell 
added his own twist. 

"I'm not going to tell 
you what the twist is," 
Burrell sasid. "You have 
to come see the play." 

Christian Dantes, a 
freshman theatre major, 
plays Action, who is 
one of the Jet gang's top 
members w ith Riff (the 
leader) and Diesel. Action 
is a ferret-like guy with 
limitless energy always 
eager for a fight. He is 
rash, quick to argue and 
ready to start trouble or 
jump in at the first sign. 
He is one of the oldest 



members of the gang and 
next in line after Riff. 

Although the NSU 
Theatre Department has 
performed "West Side 
Story" before, Burrell 
said this is his first time 
directing the play. 

"It's a challenging 
show because it allows 
so many artist to come 
together," Burrell said. 
"That's the biggest 
reward working with so 
many great artists, both 
student and faculty." 

Rehearsals began on 
January 20, were six 
days a week and lasted 
from 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. 
Dantes said rehearsals 
were sometimes long and 
required great amounts of 
work, especially in dance. 

Dantes said he is 
not a dancer but thanks 
choreographer Pia Wyatt. 

"She can make the 
worst of us look great, 
[laughs] and she does not 
let us leave until we get 
it," Dantes said. 

According to Burrell 



the rehearsals required 
times where some 
students would work on 
their acting while other 
would work on their 
singing or dancing. 

"Many times we redid 
scenes over and over 
for hours until we found 
the right feeling for that 
scene," Dantes said. 

After long nights of 
rehearsals, Burrell would 
leave singing a song from 
the musical. 

"It requires stamina 
from our actors," Burrell 
said."You have to be in 
shape physically and 
mentally." According to 
Burrell, time managament 
is also a big part of the 
being in the musical. 

Burrell wanted to draw- 
in not only the students, 
but also the community. 

"Everyone knows 
'West Side Story'," he 
said. "It's an iconic piece 
of American music and 
theatre." 

The musical allows 
students to show off their 



dancing skills, something 
Burrell wanted his senior 
students to have a chance 
to do. 

Although a freshman, 
Dantes is very thankful 
for this opportunity and 
the patience of each of 
the directors. He said he 
knows the musical will be 
great for all the hard work 
and time they have put 
into it. He hopes many 
people will come and 
bring friends. 

"It is the perfect show 
for our age group with 
fighting and action plus 
love with a great lesson to 
be learned," Dantes said. 

"All of their unique 
creativity they bring to 
their work and putting 
it all together is the 
best part," Burrell said. 
"We can't do work by 
ourselves. Like they 
saying goes, 'The whole 
is greater than the some 
of its parts'. It's greater 
together." 



1 



March 21, 2013 
7:30pm 

March 22, 2013 
7:30pm 

March 23, 2013 
7:30pm 

March 24, 2013 
2:00pm 



Free to all students with 
current Id and semester 
sticker. 

General admission is $15 



%U U%m Tta Demon 




J>emenf«ti 

U;UO-w;UU f.m. 



Student Media Leaders Needed 

Annual positions open starting summer 2013 

• Argus Editor in Chief 

• Current Sauce Editor in Chief 

• Potpourri Editor in Chief 

• KNWD General Manager 



Applications available for Potpourri and 
Current Sauce in Kyser Hall, RM 225 
Argus 316G or316N 
KNWD 31 6D 

Deadline to submit: March 25 
Scholarships Available 

For more information, contact: 
Argus: Dr. Julie Kane, kanej@nsula.edu 
Current Sauce: Dr. Paula Furr, furrp@nsula.edu 
Potpourri: Stephanie Masson, massons@nsula.edu 
KNWD: Arther Dew, dewa@nsula.edu 




v 





pinions 



Catherine Beverly 

J 

Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
March 20, 2013 



Hope springs eternal but the season is brief 



So begins the brief period 
when stepping outside is a 
pleasurable experience. The 
first day of spring marks the time 
when it should no longer be cold 
and dreary. 

However, a cold and dreary 
winter in the south means a few 
cold days and many other mild, 
warm days. Despite that, spring 
is not only a time of a delightful 
seasonal shift 
but it is also 
synonymous 
with sparking a 
personal sense 
of vitality. How 

Jacob Labutka else could 
Style Columnist Disney 
happily 

portray Julie Andrews running 
through the beautiful grassy fields 
of the Alps? 

The most important part of 
spring is the opportunity it gives for 
outdoor exploration. What better 
way to celebrate a new, delightful 





Spring will soon help the grass to grown greener and the trees to 



season than with an outdoor picnic? 
There is plenty of green space along 
the Cane River Lake right across 
from campus or along Front Street 
to have a traditional picnic basket 
gathering. 

Speaking of outdoor exploration, 



there really is no better way to get 
exercise than walking through a 
nature trail. Kisatchie National 
Forest has plenty of trails and is 
only a 30-60 minute drive from 
campus (depending on how deep 
into the forest you wish to go). 



make leaves at parks like Belle Isle in 

There are also plenty of 
campgrounds in Kisatchie for 
groups of friends to bond over 
roasted marshmallows and tent 
setup. Spring would be the best 
time to engage in such a feat (before 
mosquitoes revel in the summer 



Photo by Jacob Labutka 
Detroit, Michigan. 

humidity and take turns drinking 
from campers). 

I must confess that I do not see 
myself going camping. However, 
some of us take advantage of spring 
by sleeping in the outdoors and 
others sleep in a Marriot Hotel and 



enjoy the outdoors by day. Despite 
you preference, the outdoors can 
be quite lovely in spring with 
blooming magnolias and flourishing 
trees that should not be taken for 
granted. 

Spring is also the perfect time 
of year for paler individuals like 
myself to lay out in the sun w ithout 
being burned to a 1 00-degree crisp. 
If you do get a little crispy, even in 
spring, then there will still be aloe 
vera for those unrelenting burns that 
many hope will turn into a tan. 

The moral of this seasonal 
rant is an attempt to express 
the importance of the outdoors, 
especially in smaller areas like 
Natchitoches. Many of us hope to 
move on to bigger and more urban 
places, but for now we should 
appreciate the beauty around us. 
New York may have Central Park, 
but smaller towns are comprised of 
citywide gardens and green space 
that do not need to be planned and 
set apart. 



Ih 




Jimmie Walker 


Andrea Nederostova 


Editor-in-Chief 


Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 


Contessa Wills 


Adviser 


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Ty Johnson 


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Alexis Reliford 


Chris Degeyter 


Life Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Jimmie WatKer 


Jessica Blow 


Sports Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Catherine Beverly 


Linda Ahlskog 


Opinions Editor 


Social Media 


Kirstie White 


Camille Mosley 


Copy Editor 


Freshman Scholar 


Jacob Labutka 


Taylor Furr 


Lifestyle Columnist 


Delivery Personnel 



Office phone 
318-357-5456 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



LAFF-A-DAY 




ACROSS 

1 Foul 

4 Supporters 
8 Easter 
entrees 

12 Actress 
Gardner 

13 Somewhat 

14 Shrek, e.g. 

15 Trawler 
need 

16 Jail 
18 18th 

president 

20 Obtained 

21 Verdi opera 
24 Intrinsically 
28 Arab's 

hooded 
clo&fc 

32 Clarinet 
insert 

33 Anger 

34 - Dame 

36 Mr. Hammar- 
skjold 
Culture 
medium 
Rikki-Tikki- 
Tavi is one 
Old photo- 
graph hue 
Rules, for 
short 
Have 
46 Cowboy's 
greeting 
1984 movie 
remade in 
2011 

Fish eggs 

56 Inlet 

57 Met melody 



King Crossword 



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Doubtfire" 42 

© 2013 King Features 



Catch a 
glimpse of 
Jazz style 
A Bobbsey 
twin 
Dire 

prophecy 
Titanic VIP 
Start over 
Red and 
Black 
Lip 

Diagonal 
Press on 
Harvest 
Coastal flier 
Highbrow 
Hooligan 
Bear, in 
Barcelona 
Piercing tool 

Synd.. Inc. 



45 Biblical 
boat- 
wright 

47 Finish a film 
shoot 

48 Clinton's 

1 996 oppo- 
nent 

49 Shrill bark 

50 Media 
watchdog 
org. 

Reaction to 
fireworks 

52 Eggs in a lab 

53 Raw rock 

54 Round Table 
address 



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that each row across, each column down and 
each small 9-box square contains all of the 
numbers from one to nine. 



DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★ ★ ★ 



* Moderate ** Challenging 
★ ★ ★ HOO BOY! 

© 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. 



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-sew vaceesrr £. Lee. 




: We .need writers] \ 

Our newspaper needs more sto- 
ries written by students! If you are 
interested, come by our office, 227 
Kyser. 

Staff positions are available at the 
start of each semester and volun- 
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Meetings are every Monday at 
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you! 

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All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



{few - * ■ .• • » » * .-}.* -i ■ -- 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
March 20, 2013 





Gary Hardamon 
Senior Shamir Davis cuts a 
piece of the net after the 
Demons' win over SFA. 

Dynomite: 
Let's dance, 
Demons 

Still high on the Southland 
Conference tournament win 
and hearing their team's 
named the 14 ,h seed in the NCAA 
basketball tournament, the Demons 
will have to refocus to get job done 
Friday night against fourth-seeded 
Florida in Austin, Texas. 

The 
"experts" 
have already 
counted the 
Demons 
out of this 
one, but like 
many who 

live outside of Jimmie Walker 

Cajun Country, Editor-in-Chief 
they all seem 

to have forgotten that Cinderella 
wears purple. 

Of course the game will be 
extremely tough for the Demons, 
and their chances of winning are 
significantly lower than the Gators. 
But people have to remember that a 
chance is all a team needs in March. 
To increase that chance of w inning, 
NSU must do a few things. 

The team needs to settle down. 
Winning a conference tournament 
was great and being on the national 
stage is better, but not stopping to 
appreciate the things that helped 
them get their will be an easy ticket 
back to Natchitoches. So keeping 
their emotions under control from 
this point on is the first thing they 
need to do. 

Florida is going to come and 
make a statement, so expect them 
to make a mistake by looking past 
NSU. The Gators lost its conference 
championship game against Ole 
Miss, so assume Florida is coming 
to prove a point. 

With that in mind, the Demons 
must play transition defense, or 
just play defense in general. Easy 
buckets will knock them out fast. 

Defense hasn't been their best 
asset this year. Sure.D they force 
turnov ers, but that because teams 
play too frantic against the Demons. 
They lack mental composure when 
pressure is in their face, and they 
have a hard time getting up court 
when NSU runs a press. That 
won't happen against the Gators. 
NSU will still try to press because 
they want to make Florida's 
guards uncomfortable, but don't 
expect them to be rattled because 
someone's in their face. 

What NSU needs to do is make 
the Gators take shots they wouldn't 
normally take. Play the ball and the 
man so players won't backdoor you. 
Florida knows the Demons can 
score. In fact, the entire country '■ 
knows it, as NSU leads the nation 
in scoring with 8 1 .0 ppg. An off- 
shooting night is never out of the 
question in basketball, but there is 
more than one way to skin a cat. 

NSU will have to fine other ways 
to score besides shooting jump 
shots. Taking advantage of easy 
scoring opportunities will be the last 
key to victory for the Demons. 



Walker gets his 
groove back 



Tiandra Williams 

Sauce Reporter 

He broke records. He turned 
heads. 
He became a legend at 
Northwestern State University. And 
he did it all in 10.13 seconds. 
Who is he? 

Justin "Scooter" Walker is NSU's 
2010 freshman track phenomenon. 
Now, he is trying to break his own 
record. 

A California native and now Slideli 
resident, Walker chose NSU while a 
senior at Slideli High School. De- 
spite breaking his foot that year, he 
still received many scholarships of- 
fers. But, for him, NSU was the best 
option. 

Walker holds the NSU record for 
sprints: the 100m (10.13) and the 
200m (20.49) won during his fresh- 
man year. His other awards earned 
were the 2010 Louisiana and 2010 
Southland Conference Male Ath- 
lete of the Year. He wants to go out 
and beat these times not only for a 
new school record, but he has other 
dreams for track away from NSU. 

"I would love to be a member of 
the 2016 Olympic Track and Field 
Team," Walker said. 
Surprisingly, his first love and ide- 
al career choice as a child was not 
track, but football. However, af- 
ter being told he was too small, he 
chose track. 

As a natural athlete. Walker ran 
track and played football and bas- 
ketball in high school. He received 
multiple honors: three years as track 
MVP, state champion in the 100 and 
200m, All-State in special teams' 
football and member on the Louisi- 
ana All-Star football team. 

His sports role model was NBA 
superstar Michael Jordan. 
"He was the best at what he did and 
worked hard to get there, Walker 



said. 

He also credits his mother, Mar- 
quette Defillo, for his successes. 

"She is one of the few people 
to support me in everything I did," 
Walker said. "She gives great insight 
and support when times are tough 
for me.". 

Despite breaking NSU track re- 
cords his freshmen year, he failed to 
beat his personal best his sophomore 
year. Nonetheless, he continued to 
be a top performer in the Southland 
Conference (SLC), placing second 
in the 100m and 200m during the 

2011 SLC championships. 

A knee surgery prevented Walker 
from competing during the 2011- 

2012 track season, so he replaced 
track with art as a hobby while con- 
tinuing to prepare himself physically 
for his next season. 

"It was hard to watch everyone 
else practice and compete," Walker 
said. "This season I am expecting to 
just get back into the flow of compe- 
tition. Mentally, I am focused and 
trying to tune out outside opinion. 
Physically, I am trying to work and 
on the weak aspects of my craft, so 
I can become a faster and more con- 
sistent runner." 

Walker placed second in the 60m 
and sixth in the 200m during this 
year's SLC Indoor Championship. 
Walker said he is excited to start the 
outdoor season, which is his favorite 
part of track. 

As outdoor the season begins, 
he quotes singer Bob Marley: "You 
never know how strong you are, un- 
til being strong is your only choice." 
This quote inspires him, but he en- 
courages everyone to seek inner 
strength. 

"Push through hard times and 
set obtainable goals for yourself," 
Walker said. "Trust in your abilities 
and release yourself of unnecessary 
pressure. " 







photo by Gary Hardamon/NSU photo 
Justin Walker sprints to the finish line in a 100m race during a home track meet. 



Cornerstones of NSU athletics motivate student-athletes 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Staff Reporter 



"A! 



cademic Achievement, 
Personal Responsibility, 
Competitive Success... 
Every Minute, Every Hour, Every 
Day!" 

These are the three cornerstones for 
NSU student-athletes created by the 
director of athletics, Greg Burke. 
Many people could think that win- 
ning games and matches is the most 
important factor for the athletic fac- 
ulty; however, academic results are 
what matter the most. 

The NSU Athletic Department 
takes many steps to ensure that its 
athletes make good grades. There 
are roughly 400 student-athletes at 
NSU, and the overall athletics GPA 
is 2.85. NSU graduates approxi- 
mately three out of every four ath- 
letes. 

The athletic department orga- 
nizes the annual NSU Athletic Ban- 
quet to reward the most successful 
student-athletes in their academics. 
Only those athletes who make the 
honor roll are allowed to attend the 
banquet of the following year. This 
fact motivates many students who 
want to attend the banquet. At the 
banquet, student-athletes from each 
classification male and female with 
the best GPA receive awards called: 
Freshman of the Year, Sophomore of 
the Year and Junior of the Year. 

"Many times when students 



MAMA'S &OYZ 




Softball player Bailee Cartwright receives the Female Freshman of the Year Award. 



submitted photo 



make 4.0 and win the award they are 
surprised because they forget that 
we giv e these awards," Carrie Crow- 
ell. Head Academic Coordinator for 
student-athletes said. "However, stu- 
dents usually keep in mind the aca- 
demic banquet, and for some of them 
it is a goal to attend it, so it motivates 
them to make good grades. We of- 
fer the academic banquet every fall 
typically around September and we 



do that at the Landing Restaurant 
in downtown Natchitoches, and the 
dinner is very graciously donated by 
the Landing." 

The athletic department does 
not only reward male and female 
student-athletes with the highest 
GPA from each classification, but 
the "Trailblazer Award" is given to 
a student who has changed their life 
academically. 



"We like to honor them because 
a lot of the times, they don't get the 
recognition they deserve for their 
hard work they put in because their 
hard work does not equal someone 
else's hard work as far as grades are 
concerned," Crowell said. 

Another great motivation for 
student-athletes is a "Demon Cup," 
which is a year-long competition 
among all the athletic teams at NSU 



that includes more than just good 
GPA. The "Demon Cup" is a good 
team spirit builder because the only 
way to be successful in it is to work 
as a team. 

"'Demon Cup' is something that we 
have started this year." Crowell said. 
"In previous years we had a compe- 
tition called the 'Demon Academic 
Challenge' that only looked at the 
things academic-related like GPA, 
and turning in advising sheets on 
time. We decided to branch out and 
change the rules a little bit because 
we had a certain team that continued 
to win. We also wanted to make sure 
that we are incorporating some of 
the other things that are important 
about being student-athlete such as 
getting involved in the community 
and teams cheering for each other." 

NSU's Athletic Department has 
also developed an academic program 
run by Kelee Grimes, Assistant Aca- 
demic Coordinator for NSU athlet- 
ics. The program closely monitors 
academic results of certain student- 
athletes who struggle. These stu- 
dents meet with Kelee every week to 
go over their classes and make sure 
that they are on track to be success- 
ful. 

"This is just a small percent- 
age of our student-athletes though," 



For complete story, 
visit nsudemons.com 



WWW.MAMASBOYZ.COM JBRKY CRAFT 






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Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, April 10, 2013 o Natchitoches, Louisiana 



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Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 19 




Alumna on MTV program 

Courtesy of News Bureau 

Northwestern State Univer- 
sity alumna Deven Mac- 
Nair is appearing on MTV's 
"Made". MacNair, a 1996 graduate 
in theatre, serv ed as coach for an epi- 
sode "MADE: Stunt Woman," which 
is on air now. 

MADE is a self-improvement re- 
ality television series. The series has 
followed teens who have a goal and 
want to be "made" into things like 
singers, athletes, dancers and skate- 
boarders. The show is expanding to 
give opportunities to people in their 
early 20s who are looking for a ca- 
reer. 

"The taping took over eight 
weeks," said MacNair, a native of 
Ventura, Calif, who came to North- 
western State on a Softball scholar- 
ship. "I worked with a woman who 
recently graduated from college. She 
went from someone with no stunt ex- 
perience or relative skills to someone 
who could go on a stunt audition in a 
matter of weeks. I was glad I did it. 
I enjoyed getting to pass along some 
of the knowledge 1 have gained." 

MacNair has more than a dozen 
credits over the past five years. She 
has been a stunt performer for films 
including 12 Rounds, The Green 
Lantern and Jonah Hex along with 
the TV series Treme and Common 
Law. 

MacNair has been a professional 
wrestler under the name Fire and 
has worked with the USO enter- 
taining military personnel. Her next 
stunt role is in the upcoming Woody 
Harelson film Now You See Me. 

At Northwestern State, MacNair 
was a four-year letter winner on the 
Softball team and was looking for a 
way to continue using her skills as an 
athlete. 

"As my graduation present, my 
parents paid for me to go to a sword 
workshop in Las Vegas," said Mac- 
Nair. "I then went to Los Angeles 
and after many dead ends bought a 
ticket to Universal Studios since I 
knew they had stunt shows there. 

After the show, I went to talk to the 
stunt performers and asked them how 
to get started. I met the director who 
said he was casting for a Universal 
Studios show in Japan and they were 
looking for six-foot blondes. 

I auditioned and got the part of 
Brunhilda the Viking Queen. I spent 
two years in Japan honing my craft 
and then came back to the U.S." 

MacNair says the chance to work 
on MADE should help her as she 
moves to the next stage in her career. 

"I've been able to work steadily, 
but I hope to be able to move to the 
next level as a stunt coordinator," 
said MacNair. "That is where the 
longevity is." 

The episode of MADE should be 
available online at mtv.com soon af- 
ter its initial airdate. 



SGA Online Election 

Online elections 
end today at 4 pm. 

sgaelections@nsula.edu 




The recipient of the one-year award must maintain a 3.0 grade point average. The award was created in the honor of the late mentor Dorothy 
Prestridge. 

Scholarship benefits nursing students 

'A donor reaches out to nursing students in honor of late wife' 



Courtesy of News Bureau 

A scholarship to benefit a fresh- 
man nursing student has been 
established at Northwestern 
State University to honor the memo- 
ry of Dorothy Prestridge Turner, who 
was a mentor to many young nurs- 
ing students during her long career. 

Robert Leonard Turner Jr. of 
Shreveport established the nurs- 
ing scholarship in memory of his 
late wife with preference given 
to a student from Buckeye High 
School, then open to any student 
from central Louisiana. The re- 
cipient of the one-year award must 
maintain a 3.0 grade point average. 

Mrs. Turner, 72, passed away Feb. 
21 at Overton Brooks VA. Medi- 
cal Center after a lengthy illness. 



She was a native of Libuse and resi- 
dent of Shreveport since 1 97 1 . She 
was retired from the U.S. Air Force 
Reserves with the rank of major. 

Turner was a member of the 
Critical Care Nurses Association 
and served on several professional 
boards. She was passionate about 
the field of nursing and main- 
tained a positive attitude during 
her final illness, her husband said. 

From 1961-64, Turner attend- 
ed the Mather School of Nurs- 
ing in New Orleans where she 
earned a baccalaureate degree be- 
fore she joined the Air Force and 
was stationed in San Antonio. 

Turner served on active duty with 
the Air Force for two years before 
becoming a reservist and working 
as a flight nurse out of Barksdale 
Air Force Base. During that time, 



she earned her bachelor's (1969) 
and master's (1975) degrees in nurs- 
ing at Northwestern State's Shreve- 
port nursing campus. Later, during 
the 26 years she served as Overton 
Brooks VA. Medical Center, she 
also completed nurse practitio- 
ner requirements through the VA. 

Robert Turner said offering the 
scholarship to a first year stu- 
dent was important to his late 
wife because the first year "can 
be a make or break year." Turn- 
er's sister, Inez Brown, agreed. 

"During her first year of school, she 
had a hard time, being away from 
home," Brown said. "She believed 
the first year was a critical year for a 
students and if they got a good start 
they would stay with it." Brown de- 
scribed her sister as a dedicated nurse 
and a strong-willed person, which 



helped her overcome obstacles. 

"Many of those who worked with 
her in ICU at the VA. and those 
she helped train came to us dur- 
ing her illness and said how much 
she helped them, in her teaching, in 
her deportment and in the compas- 
sion she had for patients," Brown 
said. "She had taken many of those 
young ones under her wing. We 
heard so many things about her. 
She helped a lot of people along the 
way. She was a very giving person." 

For more information on con- 
tributing to the Dorothy Prestridge 
Turner Scholarship, contact the 
Northwestern State University 
Foundation at (318) 357-4414. 

For information on NSU's 
College of Nursing and Allied 
Health visit nursing.nsula.edu. 



Students set to register 
classes for next semester 



Courtesy of News Bureau 

|""^ arly registration for the sum- 
mer and fall 2013 semesters 
has begun at Northwestern State 
University. 

Students can sign up for the 
12-week summer session through 
May 19. Registration for the first 
eight-week summer session and the 
first four-week session is available 
until June 2 and through June 30 for 
the second four- week session. 

Fall registration is available 
through Sept. 4. Students can begin 
registering based on their classifica- 
tion through Friday, April 12. Open 
registration for the summer and fall 
semesters begins Saturday, April 13. 



Northwestern State students 
enter their courses and select the 
times for them on their own through 
NSUConnect, which is available 
through the university's homepage 
at nsula.edu. NSUConnect is avail- 
able daily from 5 a.m. to 11:55 p.m. 
CDT. 

"Early registration is essential 
for students — especially for those 
who need upper level courses," said 
Dr. Lisa Abney, provost and vice 
president for academic and student 
affairs. "If students wait to register 
for a class, it may be cancelled for 
low enrollment during the summer, 
so it's important that students get 
enrolled before they leave for the 
summer." 

Students who register between 




Students can begin registering based on their classication 
through Friday., April 12. 

April 8 and May 19 will be eligible 
to win a weekly drawing for a S25 
gift card. Seven winners will be 
selected from among those students 
who have registered for the summer 
or fall semester. 

For more information on summer 
and fall registration at Northwest- 
ern State, go to registrar.nsula.edu/ 



Student Messenger 
Update 

Please check student 
e-mails for updates on reg 
istration and overrides 



NSU Health 
director urges 
students to get 
tested 

Janell Parfait 

Sauce Reporter 

Over 79 million Americans, es- 
pecially teenagers and young 
adults, are carrying a strain of 
the human papilloma virus, or HPV. 
With nearly invisible symptoms, 
many will either live out the rest of 
their lives unaware that they are car- 
rying a potentially lethal virus or pos- 
sibly die from related complications. 

"We have to realize the reality 
and educate ourselves," Stephanie 
Campbell, director of NSU's health 
services said. Campbell believes that 
because HPV is a recently discovered 
virus, not many people are aware of 
its potential, let alone its existence. 

According to the Center for Dis- 
ease Control, there are over 1 00 types 
of HPV. Some strains can infect the 
mouth or throat, while others can 
infect the genital area. Unlike HIV, 
which is passed through blood and 
other bodily fluids, HPV is spread 
through close skin contact. 
While HPV in women may develop 
into cervical, uterine or other vaginal 
cancers, men are not exempt from 
any potential health risks. Men with 
HPV could still get genital warts 
much the same as women, Campbell 
said. Cancers related to the genitals 
also exist in HPV carriers of both 
sexes. 

Since 2006, there has been a vac- 
cine to prevent contracting HPV, ac- 
cording to the CDC. Gardasil is a se- 
ries of three shots available for both 
men and women between the ages of 
nine and 26. The CDC recommends 
that Gardasil be administered before 
a teenager or young adult becomes 
sexually active. Campbell believes 
that because the vaccine can be given 
to children as young as 9, education 
should start from the pediatricians. 

According to the National Con- 
ference of State Legislatures, Texas 
became the first state to mandate the 
Gardasil vaccine for all girls enter- 
ing sixth grade on Feb. 2007. Since 
then, 41 states and Washington D.C 
have introduced bills to mandate the 
vaccine. As for Louisiana, a bill pro- 
posing that insurance companies pro- 
vide coverage for HPV vaccinations 
is currently in committee. 

For the uninsured, taking an HPV 
shot at a gynecologist could cost up 
to S300, Campbell said. However, 
NSU's health clinic provides the vac- 
cine free for students covered under 
student insurance. "We will certainly 
work with students on Gardasil vac- 
cines," Campbell said. 

Other preventative methods, 
such as wearing a condom, limiting 
the number of sexual partners and 
getting regular Pap tests for women 
can help decrease the chances of 
contracting HPV, but taking the vac- 
cine before becoming sexually active 
is the most effective way to prevent 
HPV infections. 

Services at NSU's health clinic are 
free to students with student insurance. 
It is open Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.- 4 
p.m. and Fridays,7:30 a.m.-noon. It 
is located at 3 1 5 Caspari St., next to 
university police. The number for the 
front desk is 318-357-5351. 



Index 



2 DemonFest 

3 'Oz' review 

4 Baseball 



Wednesday 

81746° 



Thursday 

66741° 



Friday 

74745° 



Saturday 

78751° 



Sunday 

80766° 



Monday 

83766° 



Tuesday 

83765° 





Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 

April 10, 2013 



Director, producers of "Beasts of the 
Southern Wild" to speak at Northwestern 



News Bureau 

The director and producers 
of the Academy Award - 
nominated film "Beasts of 
the Southern Wild" will present a 
screening at Northwestern State 
University Wednesday. April 17 at 
6:30 p.m. in the Friedman Student 
Union Ballroom. Admission is free 
and open to the public, but seating 
in '.he ballroom is limited. 

Dii ctor Benh Zeitlin and pro- 
ducer: losh Penn and Dan Janvey - 
ill present the film and answer I 
stions after the screening. 
"Beasts of the Southern Wild" 
■t in a forgotten but defiant 
bayou community cut off from the 
rest of the world by a sprawling 
levee. In the film, a six-year-old 
girl (Quvenzhane Wallis) exists on 
the brink of becoming an orphan. 
Buoyed by her childish optimism 
and extraordinary imagination, she 
believes that the natural world is 
in balance with the universe until 
a tierce storm changes her reality. 
Desperate to repair the structure 
of her world in order to save her 
ailing father and sinking home, 
this tiny hero must learn to survive 



unstoppable catastrophes of epic 
proportions. 

The film was nominated for 
four Academy Awards including 
Best Picture and Best Adapted 
Screenplay. Zeitlin was nominated 
for Best Director and Wallis re- 
ceived a Best Actress nomination. 

A native of New York City, 
Zeitlin Was raised in Sunnyside, 
Queens and then Westchester 
County. Zeitlin began his career 
as a filmmaker at 6 when he and 
a friend made a Batman movie. 
He continued making films as a 
child before attending Wesleyan 
University where he majored in 
film. After graduation, Zeitlin 
spent a summer in Prague working 
with a prominent animation artist. 
Returning to the U.S., he worked 
in a private school in Manhattan 
helping elementary students create 
short films. Zeitlin won the 2012 
Smithsonian American Ingenuity 
Award for the Visual Arts. 

"Beasts of the Southern Wild" 
was the first feature film produced 
by Penn and Janvey. 

In 2009, Penn was selected to 
take part in Sundance's Creative 
Producing Initiative and in 201 1 



he was selected to take part in the 
Cannes Producers Workshop. Penn 
produced the short film "Glory at 
Sea" which won 15 film festival 
awards including SXSW and the 
Woodstock Film Festival. In addi- 
tion to films, Penn has produced a 
number of music videos including 
MGMT's "Time to Pretend" and 
"Electric Feel." He is currently 
producing two documentaries in 
post: the Ross Brothers' "Tchoupi- 
toulas" and Sara Dosa's "Roots 
and Webs," as well as develop- 
ing two fiction films: Mark Elijah 
Rosenberg's "Ad Inexplorata" and 
Ray Tintori's "Untitled Adventure 
Serial." 

Janvey has produced numerous 
award winning short films, includ- 
ing Ray Tintori's "Death to the 
Tinman" and "Glory at Sea." Both 
movies were made with the film- 
making collective Court 13. Janvey 
participated in the Sundance Insti- 
tute Creative Producing Initiative 
as a Mark Silverman Fellow. 

The screening is sponsored by 
the Northwestern State Department 
of Language and Communication 
and is funded through a grant from 
the Louisiana Board of Regents. 















x: 


















tte 


I 




ubmi 


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cans 



"Beasts of the Southern Wild" will present a screening at NSU Wednesday, April 17 at 6: 
p.m. Shown above is a promotional photo for the Academy Award- nominated film. 



30 




Terror at the Tea party 
performs one of their hits for 
the crowd at KNWD's Demon 
Fest. Demon Fest was a 
free event held on March 
23 at the NSU Tailgating 
Field. True to Louisiana's 
wide variety of music, 
the genres of the bands 
range from jazz-fusion to 
alternative rock and metal. 
Demon Fest began with 
a pre-show at 11:30 a.m. 
featuring top hits from 
KNWD's popular radio 
show "Gamer Tracks." 
Bands began at noon and 
ended after the headliner, 
Shreveport's own Super 
Water Sympathy performed 
at 7:30 p.m. Northwestern 
student organizations also 
participated by selling 
food and providing other 
activities such as picture 
opportunities and games. 



Demon Fest rocks the crowd 




A guitarist from the band Terror at the Tea Party strums his guitar as festival goers sway to the 

music and take pictures. 



Tajh Derosier and the Hybrid Groove serenades the crowd with smooth jazz sounds during 
KNWD's Demon Fest. 





pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
April 10,2013 



Walking, lifting and tree posing: thoughts on exercise 



It's 8'o clock in the morning and 
you awake to find that you are 
entirely twisted amongst your 
blankets in comfortable ecstasy. 

Unfortunately, you have 
been pressing snooze for 
the last half hour and if 
you delay any more you 
will miss your exam and 
won't get that paper turned 
in. 

This is a predicament |., C(| 
that college students know 
of far too well. If we don't 
want to get up for class, then why 
we would we arise for anything 




else. However. I do suggest 
something for your consideration: 
going to the gym. 

To be sure, many people frequent 
the WRAC as soon 
as it opens at 5 in the 
morning every weekday. 
Others like their sleep 
and choose to build their 
muscles when the sun has 
been up for at least a few 
hours. 

And others either find 
other mediums of exercise 
like walking briskly to class or find 
themselves too busy to head to the 



gym (or are constantly browsing 
around the internet). 

To that I say, I understand. I 
have no judgments nor any ulterior 
motives to market protein powder 
that sells at eighty dollars a canister. 
Sometimes we are too busy or 
distracted to think about starting a 
regular exercise routine. 

Yet, sometimes we feel as if our 
arm muscles should be more firm or 
wish for a sea of endorphins to flow 
through our insides. 

These things can happen with 
regular gym visits. Not to say it 
works the same for everyone, but at 



the end of the day you do feel better 
after a good workout (sometimes 
after the first half hour of wishing 
your pain away of course). 

Another reason to go to the 
WRAC: you're technically paying 
for it. It operates from student fees 
and is open so you can either go at 5 
in the morning or 7 at night. 

The exception to this is odd 
weekend times that I've never 
quite understood, but weekends are 
typically more flexible for students 
(unless your life happens to be a 
constant busy mess). 

If you absolutely cannot make 



it to the gym, then take a stroll 
through town. Walks are typically 
only effective if you engage in them 
for a lengthy period of time, but 
with a group of friends and scenic 
pathways they definitely become 
more enjoyable. 

Also, I've never tried yoga (with 
the exception of the tree pose), but 
that may also prove to be a viable 
exercise option for you. 

Overall, the ability to engage in 
regular patterns of physical fitness 
is a matter of one's schedule and 
priorities. 

If all else fails, summer proves to 



be an excellent time to start a new 
routine (workout or otherwise). 

Summer is also a great time to 
see ridiculously chiseled abs on 
the torsos of beach going men, 
which is often the result of hours 
of exercise most days of the week 
and strict dieting. If that is you, 
then congratulations because you 
deserve those sculpted abs. 

For the rest of us who seek a 
similar yet not as stringent path, 
in the words of one of YouTube's 
greatest sensations, "Ain't nobody 
got time for that." 



A bad case of puppy love: 
unconditional and suffocating 




Last year, around Christmas 
time, my family received 
one of the greatest presents a 
family could get. No, not the lottery, 
but rather a puppy. 

His name is Grip and he is a 
miniature rat terrier. He is feisty 
as all get out 
and incredibly 
intelligent. 

Grip has the 
learning capacity 
of a two-year-old 
child, which may 

Camille Mosley not secm as 

T7 , Oil SUCn a t?° 0cl 

treshman Scholar ,. 

thing, but he 

knows words and phrases and can 

tell the difference between every 

member of our household. Grip is 

considered merle, which means he 

comes in all the colors — brown, 

white, and black. 

We got Grip when he was four 
weeks old and the normal time to 
get a pupp'y^i'sTietween'six'arid eij»ht' 
weeks. Grip was already small, but 
he was also the runt of the litter. 

Grip has definitely changed our 
household with his giant ears and 
witty looks, but he does have his 
devious moments. Grip used to 
"rage poop," as I call it, when he 
was still little. We would pick him 
up, he would fall asleep, then we 
would put him in his box to sleep. 

He slept in the room with my 
sister and me, so we would wake up 
to the sound of crying and the smell 
of poop. As we would peep into his 
little box, we saw that he not only 
pooped everywhere, but he had 
walked in it. Needless to say, at one 
year and five months, he does not 
like to take baths. 

Grip is now over a year old and 



completely trained. I forgot what it 
was like to be around a puppy until 
I visited my dad who lives in Texas 
this spring break. I knew that he had 
two cats and two dogs who were 
smaller, but older, but I was not 
prepared for Jack. 

Jack is a Jack Russell terrier who 
is 15 weeks old. He is white and 
weighs 1 1 pounds. The only way to 
describe him is an adorable turd. As 
soon as I walked into the house, this 
little guy immediately jumps up to 
me and bites my hair. 

The next thing I knows, I am on 
my knees being smothered by dogs. 
My dad's two other dogs (a female 
Shi-Tzu and a male toy poodle) 
are all on me, biting at my hair, 
pulling at my necklace, barking, 
and snapping at my face. I could not 
deal. 

As the days wore on, the animals 
just got stranger. The toy poodle 
Bo-Bo, or Bandit, is addicted to 
being touched. He wants to be 
petted, rubbed, even putting a hand 
on him would suffice. He is the 
sweetest, most peculiar dog I've 
come across. 

Chi-Chi, or China Doll, is the 
only female and the alpha out 
of everyone. She is a shitzu, as 
before mentioned, and a total jerk. 
She has this tendency of getting 
extremely jealous and then biting at 
everyone's faces. 

All of these little creatures 
were a little hard to handle, but I 
enjoyed every single moment with 
them. I have decided, though, that 
after dealing with puppies and 
almost being smothered by them 
on multiple occasions, I will get 
a rescue dog and not have to deal 
with rage-pooping pups! 



The 




u rrent 

auce 



Jimmie Walker 


Andrea Nederostova 


Editor-in-Chief 


Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 


Contessa Wills 


Adviser 


Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 


Damian Glover 


News Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Alexis Reliford 


Chris Degeyter 


Life Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Jimmie Walker 


Jessica Blow 


Sports Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Catherine Beverly 


Linda Ahlskog 


Opinions Editor 


Social Media 


Kirstie White 


Camille Mosley 


Copy Editor 


Freshman Scholar 


Jacob Labutka 


Taylor Furr 


Lifestyle Columnist 


Delivery Personnel 



Office phone 
318-357-5456 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Our newspaper needs more stories written by 
students! If you are interested, come by our 
office, 227 Kyser. 

Staff positions are available at the start of each 
semester and volunteer positions are year- 
round! 

Meetings are every Monday at 4:00 p.m. We 

hope to hear from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



The Great and Powerful Oz' 

Oz' was not as great as the hype let on 
Rating: toooo 



Annie Desoto-Buras 

Guest columnist 

If there is any unqualified praise 
that one could give Oz the Great 
and Powerful it would be that it 
is quite pretty. 

This film is very aesthetically 
pleasing, even if it has little else 
going for it. The opening credit 
sequence is very good and fun to 
watch, composed as it is of optical 
trickery and fascinating movement 
with a lovely puppet-show 
appearance. 

The Kansas setting of the film 
is nothing much to look at since 
it's shot in black and white, though 
it is appealing enough. Oz's world 
of lush colors and rich textures, 
however, at times has the same 
appearance of Tim Burton's Alice in 
Wonderland (2010). 

Watching in 3D makes the 
viewing even better visually, 
but as far as enhancing the total 
experience of the film you might 
not really want to spring for the 
special glasses. 

The characters of this film do 
generally leave something to be 
desired, unfortunately, especially 
the main characters. 

Oz himself (played by James 
Franco) starts out the film as a 
shifty con man who is pretty 
untrustworthy, and frankly he 
doesn't develop much throughout 
the rest of the film. 

He never really connects on an 
emotional level, and it's only at the 
very end that one starts to believe 
he might actually be a good person 



who isn't acting out of purely self- 
serving motivations. 

Glinda (Michelle Williams) has 
the untouchable quality that most 
essentially flawless characters do, 
which means that she doesn't really 
elicit any strong emotions in the 
viewer either. 

Theodora (Mila Kunis) does 
have a relatable and understandable 
development, so she does invoke 
pity and emotion in watchers. Her 
delivery, however, is unfortunately 
lacking. 

There is not much depth in the 
portrayal, and it sometimes seems 
that the actress is stuck in her That 
70s Show mindset when trying 
to navigate dramatic scenes, at 
times alternatively cardboard or 
overblown. 

It's the supporting characters 
that really make this movie worth it. 
Evanora (Rachel Weisz)is fittingly 
alluring and frightening as a wicked 
witch. 

Finley (Zach Braff) is an 
adorable flying monkey who serves 
as Oz's sidekick throughout his 
adventures in Oz and is one of the 
favorite characters of the film. 

Knuck (Tony Cox) and the 
Master Tinker (Bill Cobbs) are a 
couple of Oz's conspirators whose 
respective attitude and wisdom 
make them joys to watch. 

Even the China Girl (voiced 
by Joey King) is endearing and 
lovable. 

All-in-all the film is worth a 
watch, but you might want to wait 
to buy it until it hits the $10 or $5 
racks at Wal-mart. 





The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



* 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 

April 10, 2013 



NSU Softball 
wins rubber 
match over UCA 

Courtesy of Sports Info: 

Kylie Roos and Brooke Boen- 
ing combined on a four-hit 
shutout while Shenequia 
Abby singled to lead off the sixth 
and scored the game-winning run 
on the second base hit of the day by 
Brianna Rodriguez, giving North- 
western State a 1-0 victory Sunday 
and the series triumph over Central 
Arkansas in Southland Conference 
softball. 

The Lady Demons (28-9 over- 
all, 9-5 in the Southland) won Sat- 
urday's opening game 1-0 in nine 
innings, and recovered from an 8-4 
loss in the second game to UCA (24- 
14, 7-6). 

The outcome moved NSU into 
sole possession of second in the 
league standings, trailing only Mc- 
Neese (10-3) and just ahead of Sam 
Houston State and Lamar (both 9-6). 

"This is a big series win," said 
Lady Demon coach Donald Pick- 
ett. "We competed really well once 
again in a tight, well-pitched game 
and executed when Shenequia's 
leadoff single gave us the opportu- 
nity. Brooke battled hard and Kylie 
picked up where she left off Satur- 
day." 

Abby lashed a one-hopper into 
left-centerfield on the first pitch in 
the bottom of the sixth. Tara McK- 
enney perfectly executed a sacrifice 
bunt to move Abby into scoring po- 
sition, and one out later, Rodriguez 
cracked a 1-2 pitch sharply into cen- 
terfield to chase Abby home. 

Boening was touched up by 
doubles in the first two innings, but 
avoided damage each time. In the 
second inning, Tiffany Roby led 
off with a two-bagger and moved 
to third on a fly ball for the second 
out, but Boening notched her second 
strikeout of the inning to escape the 
threat. 

Roos came on with one out in 
the fourth and a runner on first. Al- 
though UCA had at least one run- 
ner on in the final four frames, the 
Sugar Bears never touched third 
base again. Roos (10-2) and Boening 
each fanned three, walked one and 
allowed two hits while combining to 
strand eight Sugar Bears. 

Roos allowed just three hits in the 
complete-game win Saturday, with 
only one getting out of the infield. 

Her performace earned her another 
honor. 

For the second time this season, 
Kylie Roos of the Northwestern 
State softball team has been named 
Pitcher of the Week, as announced 
by the Southland Conference office 
Monday afternoon. 

UCA's Kelsie Armstrong (17- 
9) went the distance for the third 
straight game and held NSU to one 
hit. a Rodriguez single with one out 
in the fourth, until the decisive sixth. 
After striking out 20 in 16 innings 
Saturday, she notched only two Sun- 
day. 






"4MB 




A Demon baseball player slides to reach base. The Demons have struggled to hit the ball lately, batting only .239 this season. The team hit just .1 92 against UCA. 

'Struggleville,USA' 

Demons slide to 1 3-straight losses before win over UCA 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

Chris Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 

Poor hitting has plagued the 
Demons so far this season. 
NSU (10-23, 1-8 in confer- 
ence) entered the weekend with 
13-consecutive losses haunting 
them and a batting average of . 1 87 
in the last six conference games 
as the team prepared to face the 
University of Central Arkansas 
Bears (22-8, 3-5 in conference) in 
a three-game series. 

Friday's game seemed to help 
the Demons erase the early memo- 
ries of the season. 

Zack Costa's late-game bunt 
was enough to bring home Nick 
Purdy and squeezed a 1-0 win 
over UCA. Purdy landed on base 
after he led off the seventh in- 
ning with a single to right field. 
He advanced after Edwin Gomez 
sac-bunted and Matt Farmer hit an 
infield-single to first base. 

Demon pitcher Robert Baker 
earned the win. 

"Baker was the story of the 
game. I know his pitch count was 




Steven Spann warms up for the Demons. He was one of six pitchers used in Sunday's game. 



high, but I thought this was his game 
and he deserved it," Demon baseball 
head coach Lane Burroughs said. 
"He pitched his tail off. He said he 
felt great, and nobody knows the 
body like that guy. He had condi- 
tioned himself to go that far." 

Baker (3-3) struck out nine UCA 
batters. 

"He shut down a very good team. 
They (UCA) are playing as well as 
anybody in the country," Burroughs 
said. 

NSU batted .216 for the game, 
which is well below their season av- 



erage of .239, but still managed to 
defeat UCA, a team with wins over 
three nationally-rank opponents. 

"We're not a power hitting team," 
said Burroughs. "We're a team that 
has to get bunts down and hit-and- 
run. We pressured them (UCA) to- 
day and they didn't like it. They're 
going to come out tomorrow with 
their hair on fire and come after us." 

With a little more confidence than 
before, NSU tried to build a win- 
streak in Saturday's game. Despite 
the team's effort, UCA's extra-in- 
ning burst was enough for the Bears 



to tie the series at 1-1. 

UCA struck first when Michael 
Marietta advanced home in the sec- 
ond inning thanks to wild pitches by 
Ashton Sivigliano. 

Will Watson kept the Demons alive 
with a game-tying single that scored 
Edwin Gomez. In extra innings. 
Marietta would score again thanks to 
a single by Brent Marchal and sacri- 
fice bunt by Chris Townsend. 

Sunday's rubber match showed 
a more offensive performance be- 
tween the two teams. UCA managed 
to edge out NSU, 7-4. 



"I thought our energy in the 
dugout and our approach today 
at the plate was as good as it has 
been in a long time. I'm proud of 
our guys and can live with this 
loss because everyone was in the 
game and trying to win it," Bur- 
roughs said. "We put ourselves in 
position to win it at the end, and 
we battled, scratched, and clawed. 
Nick Purdy was at the plate, and 
we like him as much as anybody 
in the country but the other guy 
won. It happens; you have to be 
able to deal with it." 

The Demons scored first this 
time when Farmer advanced 
home after a single by Regan 
Kaufman, but UCA exploded in 
shortly after, scoring five runs in 
the third inning. 

"That has been the story of our 
season. LSU, Oklahoma, and sev- 
eral other teams we have faced 
went to one run games. If we could 
ever get over the hump, we could 
get things going," Burroughs said. 
"But, that does tell me our guys 
are competing and that's the first 
thing you have to do to change the 
culture of a program." 

The Demons' next game will 
be tomorrow at 6:30 p.m. when 
the team plays host to Louisiana- 
Lafayette. 



Demon sprinters post nationally-ranked times at SFA meet 



Courtsey of Sports Info: 

orth western State's sprint 

N corps shined Saturday at the 
Skechers-SFA Alumni Invi- 
tational hosted by Stephen F. 
Austin, with Justin Walker and Ha- 
noj Carter posting nationally-ranked 
times to win individual events and 
teaming on the first-place men's 
4x100 meter relay team. 

Walker (10.36) and Carter (10.39) 
went 1-2 in the 100 meter dash, 
with the Southland's top times this 
season, despite mistaking the finish 
line and slowing up about 1 meters 
early. Walker's time ranks 20th na- 
tionally, with Carter's mark 23rd. 

Carter blazed to the nation's fifth- 
fastest wind-legal 200 meter dash 
time, a 20.67 clocking, 0.05 back 
of his league-best mark last month 
that was over the allowable wind for 
an NCAA qualifying time. Gabriel 
White, Walker, Carter and Kendal 
Taylor gave NSU the men's 4x100 
crown with a 40.6 1 time. 

Lady Demon standout Quiana 




Justin Walker sprints to the finsh at an outdoor meet. Walker posted a nationally ranked team of 10.36 at the Skechers- SFA Alumni 
Invitational track meet. He is currently ranked 20th in the nation. Aaron Williams took fourth in the triple jump with a 48-4 3/4 mark. 



triple jump for the Demons with his 
48-4 3/4 best mark. Angelica Kotun. 
Ebony Vaughn, Constance Seibles 
and Griffin were fourth in the 4x 1 00 
women's race (46.70). The Lady 
Demons got fourth in the long jump 
from Porsha Thomas (18-7 1/4) with 
teammate Kenya Thomas sixth ( 1 8- 
4 1/4). 

Seibles ran fifth for NSU in the 
women's 400 (57.24), with Jessica 
Tillery fifth in the triple jump at 38- 
11. and Delaney Nock fifth in the 
javelin (118-3). 

Griffin (24.75 in the 200) and 
Kotun (12.10 in the 100) took sixth 
for the Lady Demons, with team- 
mate Rechelle Bessard sixth in the 
hammer (140-6). The Demons got 
sixth in the 1500 by Albert Gladney 
(4:02.45) and in the high jump from 
Lionel Ellison (6-4 3/4). 



Griffin took the women's 400 meter 
run in 54.95, the conference's third- 
best mark this season. NSU's Em- 
manuel Williams was the top colle- 



giate finisher and second overall in 
the men's triple jump with a 50-9 1/2 
mark, second in the Southland and 
his best by more than three feet. 



Janae Allen gave Northwestern two 
more awards stand finishes with a 
pair of thirds, throwing 162-2 in 
the hammer and 161-3 in the dis- 



cus. Keenan Jackson of NSU was 
the third-place finisher with a 48.36 
400-meter dash time. 

Aaron Williams took fourth in the 



For complete story, 
visit nsudemons.com 



* 








like us on Facebook @thecurrentsauce 



Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, April 17, 2013 • Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦Volume 98: Issue 20 



CIS teams 
win again 

Courtesy of News Bureau 

Nine students in Northwest- 
ern State University's Com- 
puter Information Systems 
program competed at the 18th an- 
nual Association of Information 
Technology Professionals (AITP) 
National College Conference held 
April 4-6 in St. Louis, Mo. AITP 
is the leading worldwide society of 
professionals in information tech- 
nology. 

"No university or college came 
close to winning as many awards as 
NSU. We are so proud of our stu- 
dents," said Dr. Jack Russell, coor- 
dinator of Northwestern State's CIS 
program. 

Winning second place in Mo- 
bile Applications were Matt Foshee 
of Natchitoches and Jamey Nelson 
of Pitkin. Nelson and Jimmy Van 
of Leesville won second place in 
Visual Studio .NET Applications 
and Honorable Mention in Systems 
Analysis and Design. 

Jonathan Bordelon of Moreau- 
ville and Stephen Thompson of 
Natchitoches won second place in 
Enterprise Server Challenge and 
third place in JAVA Programming. 
Greg Cruice of Marrero and Adri- 
ane Lemoine of Pineville earned 
Honorable Mention in Enterprise 
Server Challenge. Van also won 
third place in Highest Score in Mi- 
crosoft Technology Associate Certi- 
fication (Security). 

Sixty-three colleges and univer- 
sity from across the United States 
attended the conference with more 
than 500 students registered. 

"It is so exciting to see that our 
students continue to do well in our 
traditional competition areas, but 
are also working to win in the newer 
areas such as Mobile Applications," 
said Barbara Russell, instructor and 
AITP faculty sponsor. 

The team and CIS faculty was 
honored during a recognition cer- 
emony yesterday. 

The program provides both 
theoretical and practical hands-on 
classes in Database, Networking, 
Programming and Systems Analysis 
& Design. 

For more information on North- 
western State's CIS program visit 
business, nsula.edu/computer-infor- 
mation-systems-home. 




Senior liberal arts major Jason Harmeyer prepares to present his thesis defense. It was the first thesis presentation of the year. A 
thesis is a report consisting of original research in the student's field of study. It's required of all Scholar's students to graduate. 

Aspiring graduates press towards the mark 

Students move one step closer to the finish line 



Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 

With graduation approaching 
Scholars' students have one 
more hurdle to overcome- 
thesis defense 

A thesis is required of all Schol- 
ar's undergrads to graduate and is 
a report comprised of original re- 
search in the student's field of study. 
This is a minimum of 40 pages and 
is worked on for the majority of a 
student's senior year. 

Theses vary depending on student 
discipline. Biology students will 
most likely have graphs and studies 
within their thesis while theater and 
dance students may have a perfor- 
mance. 

The thesis defense lasts about 
an hour The student presents their 
thesis to a crowd of interested indi- 
viduals and their readers. Readers 
are two professors with a similar 
discipline to the student's topic that 
assist them by proofreading the stu- 



dent's work. 

Both readers have to approve 
a thesis before it can be considered 
complete. Any remaining time is left 
to questions from the audience that 
the student must answer. 

"It is the culmination of their 
academic career," Davina McClain, 
Director and Associate Professor of 
Classics, said. "They bring every- 
thing that they've learned not in just 
the major courses but core course to 
bear in a research topic in something 
of interest to them." 

McClain helps schedule and at- 
tends every student's thesis defense. 
She also makes sure all rooms are 
equipped with the necessary tech- 
nology that a student requires for 
their defense. 

The very first thesis defense this 
year was on last Wednesday by Jack- 
son Harmeyer, a liberal arts major 
who studies music history. 

Harmeyer has been doing re- 
search since last spring for his the- 
sis, "Learning From the Past: The 
Influence of Johann Sebastian Bach 



Upon the Soviet Composers." 

"I'm looking at four Soviet com- 
posers and how they com batted the 
oppressive policy of Socialist Real- 
ism by drawing on their reverence 
for Bach," Harmeyer said. His thesis 
reached 75 pages and had 1 20 differ- ' 
ent sources including the pieces of 
music he incorporated. 

"It teaches you a lot about the 
scholarly process, what professors 
do and what you should expect to do 
if you enter academia somewhere," 
Harmeyer said. 

Harmeyer defended his thesis in 
front of about 30 colleagues includ- 
ing his readers, friends and other stu- 
dents interested in classical music. 

The second defense took place 
yesterday. Robin Jones, a liberal arts 
major with a concentration in scien- 
tific inquiry, presented "What Exact- 
ly is in Natchitoches' Water?" 

Jones analyzed Natchitoches' 
water for volatile substances both 
before and after treatment and found 
that some substances remained in 
the water during treatment. 



"I had heard all the jokes about 
Natchitoches water so I thought 
it would be a cool rumor to put to 
rest," Jones said. 

Jones has been conducting ex- 
periments since January and uses 
equipment in Forenet to analyze the 
water. This analysis alone took Jones 
a minimum of seven hours a week in 
addition to writing, researching and 
collecting samples. 

"It really helps with applying to 
graduate schools," Jones said. "I'm 
one of the few students around with 
an undergrad thesis." 

Jones will be attending Texas 
A&M School of Veterinary Medi- 
cine next fall to begin her four-year 
program to become a vet. Starting 
Wednesday, the remainder of the 
thesis defenses will begin. 

There are over a dozen more de- 
fenses that cover topics ranging from 
Disney to World War II fashion. A 
schedule can be found on the Schol- 
ars' College Facebook page and 
reminders will be sent out through 
Student Messenger. 



School counselor 
Eating disorders 
often under reported 



Janeli Parfait 

Sauce Reporter 



I 



t all starts off with a diet. 
An innocent way to lose 
weight that may spiral out 
of control," Kim Johnson, counselor 
at NSU's Counseling and Career 
Services Center, said. 

Eating disorders are a serious 
issue that often go unreported due 
to the concept of societal taboos. 
And with 35 percent of college-age 
women reported by the National In- 
stitute of Mental Health to have an 
eating disorder, the lack of serious- 
ness taken could in fact endanger the 
person suffering from it. 

According to NIMH, an eating 
disorder is an illness that causes dis- 
turbances in everyday dieting such 
as eating extremely small amounts 
of food or severely overeating. Eat- 
ing disorders frequently appear in 
teenagers and young adults, but they 
can also appear in children and later 
in life. 

The most obvious examples of 
eating disorders are anorexia nervo- 
sa and bulimia nervosa. Aside from 
fasting and purging, people suffer- 
ing from eating disorders can also 
abuse laxatives and diuretics, exer- 
cise excessively and even binge, ac- 
cording to the NIMH. People with 
these disorders may have a distorted 
view of themselves or see nothing 
wrong with their dieting habits. 

The Diagnostic and Statistical 
Manual of Mental Disorders recog- 
nizes three types of eating disorders: 
anorexia, bulimia and binge-eating. 

"They're mental disorders with 
physical ramifications," Ashley Jor- 
dan, registered nurse at the NSU 
health clinic, said. "You can go 
from head to toe on a person with an 
eating disorder and find something 
wrong with everything." 

The physical effects of an eat- 
ing disorder vary depending on the 
type of disorder. For example, the 
NIMH reports people with bulimia 
may suffer from esophageal dam- 
age; worn tooth enamel, tooth sensi- 
tivity and tooth decay; acid reflux or 
other gastrointestinal problems; in- 
testinal distress from laxative abuse 

or severe dehydration. 
I' 1 



For the rest of this story, check 
out www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



On campus organizations team up to serve student body 




Organizations collaborate to aid freshmen students 



Damian Glover 

Sauce Reporter 

The Career and Counseling Ser- 
vice's Department along with 
BACCHUS have been taking large 
strides to make their name known 
around campus to all students and 
faculty. 

Just this semester alone BAC- 
CHUS has hosted over several 
events including their resent ap- 
pearance at Vic's with their Spring 
Break Campaign. The Counseling 
and Career services Department has 
also been working hard to find better 
ways to accommodate students and 



recently they have come up with a 
plan to do so. 

The main focus of the new program 
will be to cater to all students,from 
freshman to seniors, especially non- 
traditional and transfer students. Sta- 
tistics show that the more a person 
knows they have someone they can 
go to, the more likely they are to suc- 
ceed in life. 

Several of BACCHUS members 
and interested students have recently 
began their training to become the 
new peer mentors of the 20 1 3 - 20 1 4 
academic school year. The new men- 
tors will be trained on how to inter- 
act with students on a mentee and 
mentor level. 



Katie Prejean, freshman general 
studies major, feels that this program 
will not only help freshmen but all 
students. 

"As a freshman coming into col- 
lege, you have so many different 
emotions," Prejean said. "Some- 
times you feel like you just want 
to go home, the familiar place you 
know. With this new organization 
you will always have that outlet to 
which you can talk to before making 
a big decision such as moving back 
home. During the fall semester, the 
department formulated a pilot group 
to be their first peer mentors. The 
group was directed to go into ori- 
entation classrooms of freshman to 
talk about alcohol abuse, drugs and 



sexual harassment which was also 
discussed in "My Student Body," a 
required program of the university 
that first-time students are required 
to take part in online. 

Ty Stuart, sophomore communi- 
cation major, feels that BACCHUS 
has helped him along his collegiate 
career path. 

"With the help of BACCHUS 
even though I may not be involved 
in it as member, I constantly see the 
things I do and they are the kinds of 
people who are life changers and life 
savers," Stuart said. "I also know 
that with the collaboration of these 
two organizations working separate- 
ly but together to achieve one goal 
will be amazing." 



Index 



2 Vegas Night 

3 G.I. Joe review 

4 Kylie Roos 



Wednesday 

83770° 



Thursday 

81745° 



Friday 

65736° 



Saturday 

72744° 



Sunday 

77750° 



Monday 

79758° 



Tuesday 

78755° 



-.»**» 








Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 

April 17, 2013 



The good times 
roll with SAB 

Jessica Blow 

Staff Writer 

The Student Activities Board lets the good times 
roll as they bring a little of Las Vegas to NSU. 
According to Special Events Coordinator and 
senior computer information systems major 
Ryan Owens, it will be a night students won't forget. 

SAB's annual "Vegas Night" will be heldApril 
23 at 7 p.m. Card and arcade games, like poker and 
slot machines, will adorn the Student Union Ballroom 
and I'ibby area providing students the opportunity to 
win i izes including a MacBook Pro and a Kindle 
Fire. Also up for grabs are an iPad Mini with retina 
display, Beats Audio Headphones, two pair of Ray- 
Ban 'Sunglasses, an Xbox and Wii U game system. 

This year Vegas Night has a lot more to offer, 
about SI 0,000 worth of prizes," Owens said. "There 
are different games to play for prizes, and the arcade 
games are for those who want to play just for fun." 

According to Owens, he and the Special Events 
Committee had weekly meetings all semester building 
up to this event to brainstorm about how they could 
motivate students to attend the event. 

"I feel students will enjoy this year"s event 
because there is a lot to offer," Owens said. "The 
prizes offered are up-to-date and fit students' 
preferences." 

According to Owens, this year he is bringing in a 
company he describes as "something like a portable 
casino." The w\..kers will dress up in dealer attire and 
assist students as if they were in a Vegas casino, and 
of age. This year's "Vegas Night" props came from 
catalogs along with some props made from SAB's 
very own members. 

"I'm excited about Vegas Night," senior 
accounting major Rachel Belton said. 

This will be Belton's first year as a SAB member 
and attending Vegas Night. 

"I think students will enjoy all the prizes we will 
have," Belton said. 

"Students will enjoy 'Vegas JMight' bgcjiuse it is 
something that gives them an experience that they 
cannot enjoy until they are a certain age," Owens 
said. "Besides just money, there is a chance of 
winning one something that can be very useful to 
them." 

Owens and his committee encourage everyone to 
come out and try their luck. Remember, what happens 

in Vegas, stays in Vegas. 




Senior Lauren Bovia will perform during NSU's Theater and Dance program "Revelations of Dance," April 19-20 in the A.A. Fredericks Auditorium 

Students showcase fancy footwork 

'Revelations of Dance' to be performed in A.A. Fredericks 




News Bureau 

Northwestern State 
University's 
Theatre and Dance 
program will showcase 
its faculty and students 
in a performance of 
"Revelations of Dance," 
April 19-20 in the A.A. 
Fredericks Auditorium. 
Show time is at 7:30 
p.m. each evening with a 
2 p.m. matinee on April 
20. 

Tickets are $15 
for adults, $12 for 
children and senior 
citizens. Northwestern 



State, BPCC@NSU 
and Louisiana School 
for Math, Science and 
the Arts students are 
admitted free with 
a current student 
I.D. Reservations 
are not required for 
"Revelations of Dance." 

The performance 
will include "Esmeralda 
Variation." "Sunscreen" 
and "Winter Solstice" 
by Kirstin Riehl, "Full 
Circle," "Ave Maria," 
"In the Deep," "Mom's 
Secret," "It's Time..." 
and "Vogue" by Brett 
Alan Garfinkel and 



"Sweet Beginnings," 
"On Foot" and "Hotel 
Dieu" by Rebecca 
Morgan. 

"I'm in four dance 
works and even 
though they are in 
different styles, they 
are cohesive," said 
senior Lauren Bovia 
of Maurepas. "The 
variety of styles speaks 
to the creativity of our 
faculty. We are exposed 
to every major style 
of dance plus musical 
theatre, which is a 
great opportunity for 
students." 



Bovia is graduating 
in May and has 
been selected for an 
internship at Jacob's 
Pillow Dance Festival 
in the Berkshire Hills of 
western Massachusetts. 
Jacob's Pillow is 
America's longest 
running dance festival, 
originating in 1933. 

Called "the dance 
center of the nation" 
by the New York 
Times, Jacob's Pillow 
brings together dance, 
music, art, nature and 
culture, with more than 
350 free and ticketed 



events including free 
outdoor performances, 
photography and art 
exhibits, free talks and 
discussions, tours, dance- 
classes, onsite dining 
and much more. Dance 
companies from around 
the world and across the 
United States perform 
in two historic theatres 
and an outdoor stage 
throughout the summer. 

Bovia will be a 
house manager and will 
be able to participate 
in master classes 
with internationally 
renowned dancers and 



choreographers. 

"I am blown away 
by the opportunity 
I have," said Bovia, 
who plans to move to 
New York to pursue a 
dance career after the 
Festival. "To be part 
of one of the leading 
dance festivals in the 
world and be around 
so many great dancers 
and choreographers is 
something I am looking 
forward to. This will be 
a big help for me as I 
move to my next step." 



How to make a grilled 
cheese sandwich using 
a microwave 

i Recipe from Wikihow.com 

Are you craving a grilled cheese sandwich, but 
don't have a frying pan in your dorm? In 
honor of National Grilled Cheese Month, the 
instructions in this article are sure to give you 
: a mouth-watering grilled cheese sandwich straight 
; from the microwave. Can't you just smell the 
delightful aroma? 

1 . For each sandwich, toast two pieces of bread 
of your choice. From Italian to pumpernickel, 
there is no type of bread which isn't safe for your 
microwave. 

2. Choose a type of cheese you would like to eat. 
You can have the traditional American cheese, or if 
you want to take a risk, try Swiss. You can even have 
Limburger if you like! 

3. Place your cheese delicately in between the 
toasted bread, and set your microwave to high. 

4. Set the time on the microwave to 20 seconds. The 
sandw ich will be ready once the cheese has melted, 
this may take up to 60 seconds depending on the 
microwave. Once the cheese has melted, let the 
sandw ich sit for about 45 seconds. 

5. Remove your masterpiece from your microwave 
and. ..Bon Appetit! 



Greek Week 201 3 




Greek Week 2013 kicked off Monday with a BBQ held at NSU's Tailgating Pavillion. Greek 
Week is designed to bring about unity throughout the Northwestern State University Greek 
community. The week is designed to instill the importance of not only being a member of a 
specific chapter, but also a member of NSU's Greek community. Pictured above are members 
of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority and Sigma Nu Fraternity of Team Ares 
participating in Tuesday's Greek Week event, Song Fest. 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

"Scary Movie V" 

4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

'Evil Dead" 

4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

"Temptation" 

4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

"The Croods 

4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

'G.I. Joe: Retaliation 8 

4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

"Jurassic Park" 

"M.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 



I 



k _____ . 





pimons 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
April 17, 2012 



Students need to get involved on campus 




I'm sure everyone remembers their freshman year and all of the first 
week seminars and classes where a group of people w ould get up and 
preach at you to "Get inv olved!" I was one of those freshmen who sat 
there and made fun of those people, but now I see w here they are 
coming from. 

Ever since that first week of school, I have managed to almost 
complete the entire "84 Things to do at Northw estern Before You 
Graduate" list. It was not until this semester that I realized how 
important this list is to me. 

I decided after v irtually sitting in my room almost every night 
and weekend last semester that things were going to be different. Camille Mosley 

-ru ii . u . • . i j . Freshman Scholar 

The college experience is not about going out every weekend to 

parties, but becoming implicated into one's college. 

I have participated in several major school events, and I am proud 

to say that I did. I have had the most wonderful experiences because I 

have decided to become one of those people w ho screeched about getting 

involved. 

This brings me to my next point. I have a friend who is the utter 
opposite of me. When I started Hy ing, she started to become even more 
of an introvert. I have tried to get her to go to events with me, but there is 
always some kind of excuse. 

Using homework as an excuse can only go so far because we all have 
homework. Since I've been more involved in school, I have made some 
incredible friends who have helped expand my horizons. Instead of having 
my room to confine me, I now have an entire campus to entertain me. 



Going out and meeting new people is probably the greatest thing that 
one can experience. As one starts to meet a ton of new people, he or she can 
decide on what he or she likes in different kinds of relationships. 

N ot only that, but after the building of such relationships, a 
person can really start to figure out and create him or herself. 

Now. w ith all of that being said, Northw estern does have some 
pretty awesome events to help students get more involved. There 
are massive amounts of scavenger hunts that help with team- 
building; there are plenty of sport events that happen that help get 
students more into school spirit. 

There are major events such as Up 'Til Dawn that has 
students send out letters from Saint Jude's Children's Hospital, 
asking for donations. This event really helps students meet 
new people because it is a huge group of students coming together for a 
common cause. 

There is the Spring Fling, which I recently attended. This event brings 
students together with the large amount of free food — crawfish I might 
add — and allowing the students to enjoy some fun games after they have 
eaten, or before they have eaten. It's all about preference. 

In the end, getting involved in one's college is important, especially as a 
freshman. It just about sets the tone for how the rest of one's schooling will 
be. Getting involved also simultaneously teaches students important skills 
such as multi-tasking, time management and how to have a perfect balance 
in school, work and play. 

All in all, get involved in school because it really is a wonderful thing. 



Life outside the 'Boot State': Forming your bucket list 




In a "city" (as defined by 
the census) as small as 
Natchitoches in a state as boot- 
shaped as Louisiana, it makes sense 
for something else to be desired. 

I will not deny 
that some of the 
best people I have 
ever met and the 
best times I have 
Jacob Labutka ever had have 
Style Columnist been around 
NSU. 

Yet, as enjoyable as college life 
is with the right friends it can also 
be teasing. 

Within the university, we study 
the world and the experiences of 
diverse individuals, hut we far less 
often get to experience the grand 
picture for ourselves. 

While learning about life 
outside the home of the meat pie, 
it is commonplace to aspire to 
experience a new part of our lives 
by doing amazing things in the 
most wondrous of places. As these 
future trav el plans start to build up, 
should w e start to make our bucket 
lists? 

While it is true that no one wants 




Writer Jacob Labutka crosses "seeing the Liberty Bell" off of his bucket list. 



to think about "kicking the bucket," 
even fewer want to think about the 
benefits of staying in the same place 
forever. If Columbus was able to 
discover the New World, then we 
should be able to experience a new 
world for ourselves. 



However, there's something 
limiting about the bucket list. While 
everything on our lists is likely 
exciting and monumental, there is 
still much life beyond the bucket. 

If w e limit ourselves to 
aspirations and dreams of 



experiencing these lists, there's so 
much more we may potentially lose 
out on. Great things can happen 
when you plan on it, but the best 
events in life are the ones that catch 
you by surprise. 

For example, I can hardly say 
that living in Cleveland was one 
of the things I wanted to do before 
turning 25. 

Yet, what I have learned and the 
people I have met while being here 
have been irreplaceable components 
of my life experience. 
And despite the Rust Belt reputation 
this city has gained, there are 
pockets of beauty where bright 
minds gather to make their home 
the best place it can be. 

I have no doubt that most of us 
are receptive to new, unexpected 
experiences. It's all about how we 
balance doing what we want to do 
and what we have yet to discover. 

Some might suggest that the 
bucket list should be dispensed 
with. I contend that we keep our 
bucket lists and add a section for 
anticipating unexpected surprises. 
That part of the list is indeed the 
most important of all. 




j # We # n e§d # wr i te rs J . j 

Our newspaper needs more stories written by 
students! If you are interested, come by our 
office, 227 Kyser. 

Staff positions are available at the start of each 
semester and volunteer positions are year- 
round! 

Meetings are every Monday at 4:00 p.m. We 
hope to hear from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



Th 




urrent 

a uce 



Jimmie Walker 


Andrea Nederostova 


Editor-in-Chief 


Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 


Contessa Wills 


Adviser 


Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 


Damian Glover 


News Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Alexis Reliford 


Chris Oegeyter 


Life Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Jimmie Walker 


Jessica Blow 


Sports Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Catherine Beverly 


Linda Ahlskog 


Opinions Editor 


Social Media 


Kirstie White 


Camille Mosley 


Copy Editor 


Freshman Scholar 


Jacob Labutka 


Taylor Furr 


Lifestyle Columnist 


Delivery Personnel 



Office phone 
318-357-5456 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



£ G. I. Joe: Retaliation' 

Reporting for entertainment, sir! 
Rating: 



• ooo 

Annie Desoto-Buras 

Guest columnist 

If you saw the prequel to this 
film, "G. I. Joe: The Rise of the 
Cobra" (2009), the first thing 
you might notice about "G. I. Joe: 
Retaliation" is that everyone looks a 
little different. 

The cast lineup has almost 
completely changed from that 
movie to this, but don't fret; 
nothing about "G.I. Joe" is meant 
to be taken very seriously. It is an 
unapologetic action flick, and it is 
fun and casual as only action films 
can be. 

The trouble starts for the Joes 
when they are attacked after 
completing a retrieval mission. 
Roadblock (Dwayne Johnson) must 
then lead Jaye (Adrianne Palicki) 
and Flint (D.J. Cotrona) to find 
the person who ordered the hit 
and to take revenge for their fallen 
comrades. 

But who could that person be? 
Well, as Roadblock says, there's 
only one person who could call for 
an attack like that. What on earth 
could be wrong with the president 
(Jonathan Pryce) that he would do a 
thing like this? 

Well the short answer is that the 
president is... not quite himself. He 
has been replaced by a duplicate 
who works for Cobra Commander. 

Also in Cobra Commander's 
employ is Firefly (Ray Stevenson), 



who has an affinity for explosions 
and an attitude to match them. This 
group, along with Storm Shadow 
(Byung-hun Lee) are putting into 
action a plot that could destroy 
much of the world and leave Cobra 
Commander in charge of what was 
left. 

But as the saying goes, there 
is no honor among thieves, and 
allegiances will be broken as certain 
truths about Storm Shadow 's past 
are brought to light. 

With their unit gone and no 
longer able to trust the government, 
the Joes must call up Snake Eyes 
(Ray Park) and Jinx (Elodie Young) 
from their mountain training for 
assistance with taking down this 
powerful enemy. 

The team also enlists the help 
of the big man himself, General 
Joe Colton (Bruce Willis), as well 
as getting some support from a no- 
longer-against-them Storm Shadow. 

It's a game of trickery and deceit 
as the Joes race the clock to prevent 
Cobra Commander from realizing 
his goal of taking control of the 
planet. 

"G. I. Joe: Retaliation" is a fun 
action romp that's enjoyable for 
just about everyone. You don't even 
need to be familiar with the G. I. 
Joe universe before buying your 
ticket, since most of the important 
backstory can be pieced together as 
the film goes on. 

So get some friends together 
and head to the movies, you won't 
regret it. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 

April 17, 2013 




Cort Brinson swings away at 
an incoming pitch. He went 
four-for-four at the plate 
against the Bulldogs. 

Errors prove 
costly in loss 
to La Tech 
Bulldogs 

Courtesy of Sports Info: 

Five errors allowed three un- 
earned runs to ruin Joey Par- 
rack's seven inning, three-hit 
gem when Louisiana Tech defeated 
the Northwestern State baseball 
team 3-1 Tuesday night in non-con- 
ference action. 

Parrack (0-5), who started on 
the mound for the Demons (11-26), 
struck out six batters and walked 
only one Bulldog (13-24), but took 
the loss when two runs scored in the 
second inning on two throwing er- 
rors. 

With one out, Kody Neel reached 
and advanced to third base on a 
throwing error from NSU catcher 
Nick Purdy that ended up in the right 
field bullpen. 

He stayed at third base when 
while Cory White hit a chopper to 
third baseman Edwin Gomez that 
ended up being low on his attempt 
at first base. 

Neel scored on a single through 
the right side from Bre'shon Kim- 
bell, and White scored from third 
base on a balk. Parrack went on to 
retire 12 of the next 15 batters he 
faced. 

"Purdy got sped up and Gomez 
was sped up, and that was the game 
pretty much," said head coach Lane 
Burroughs. "It's just a case of get- 
ting sped up and guys thinking they 
have to rush when they don't." 

In the eighth inning, Logan Shaft- 
ner replaced Parrack on the mound 
and retired the first batter he faced 
before Taylor Love reached on a 
high throwing error from shortstop 
Matt Burns. 

After he stole second base, Love 
advanced to third on a wild pitch and 
scored when Purdy tried to get him 
at third. 

The Demons scored an unearned 
run in the seventh inning that start- 
ed when Purdy reached on an error 
from Love at shortstop. 

Two singles by Matt Burns and 
Cort Brinson loaded the bases for 
Regan Kaufman who took a walk. 

Brinson was four-of-four at the 
plate, and was the only Demon to 
have a multi-hit game. Northwest- 
ern State out-hit the Bulldogs nine 
to four. 

"I benched Cort the other day and 
he goes four-for-four tonight," said 
Burroughs. "That's what we need in 
this program. We have to get tough- 
minded kids that will do anything to 
prove to coaches that he should be 
playing." 

The Bulldogs put nine pitchers 
on the mound, and only the starter 
Adam Derouen (1-0) pitched for 
more than one inning. 

"It's tough to get into a groove 
when you face a pitcher per inning, 
but we knew they were going to do 
that in a midweek game," said Bur- 
roughs. "If you're going to be a Di- 
vision one hitter, it doesn't matter 
who's out there on the mound, you 
adjust and get it done." 

NSU will continue a suspended 
game against Louisiana-Lafayette 
on Wednesday at 6:30, and admis- 
sion is free. 

The game will pick up in the top 
of the fourth inning with a Ragin 
Cajun 3-0 lead with a runner on first 
and second with no outs. 



Roos does it all 
for NSU Softball 



Tiandra Williams 

Sauce Reporter 

There is a diamond at NSU. and 
it is not the Lady Demons soft- 
ball field. 
Rather NSU's "diamond on the di- 
amond" is two-time Southland Con- 
ference Player of the Week pitcher 
Kylie Roos. She is helping to lead 
the Lady Demons to their best sea- 
son start since 1 990. Roos, a senior, 
brings to the mound experience, a 
competitive nature and love for the 
game. 

"It requires so much extra work," 
Roos said. "I am thankful for all the 
extra hours of practice and pitching 
lessons now, but as a kid I probably 
was not as understanding. However, 
it is such a rewarding position. You 
have so much control over the out- 
come of the game." 

Roos' childhood tee-ball days and 
Olympian dreams led the Celina, 
Texas native to NSU. A standout 
player at Celina High School, she 
earned All-District and All-Area 
Newcomer of the Year, All-District 
Defensive Most Valuable Player and 
All-Area Offensive MVP, All-Dis- 
trict MVP and All-Area First Team 
and District MVP and TGCA 1 A-3A 
Player of the Year. 

But her athletic talents extend be- 
yond the baseball diamond. In high 
school she lettered four years as a 
volleyball setter, gaining multiple 
awards: Freshmen Setter of the Year 
and All-Area First Team honors as a 
junior. 



Now as a Division I collegiate ath- 
lete, she has little spare time given 
her softball and academic schedul- 
ing, yet she maintains a 3.5 GPA. 
However, during her few moments 
to relax she enjoys watching the TV 
show "Scandal" or listening to Ma- 
roon 5. 

"It is all about prioritizing for each 
day's schedule and taking lots of 
naps!" Roos said. 

Those much needed naps have paid 
off for Roos. In her debut season 
"she proved to be a great asset in the 
pitching rotation" earning SLC layer 
of the week on Feb. 23. 

The following season she looked 
to step up her game as she "was a 
dual threat for NSU opponents on 
both sides of the field"... closing out 
the season as a top 10 pitcher in the 
conference with a 2.23 ERA, 116 
strikeouts and a SLC top 10 oppo- 
nent batting average of .224. 

And just last year she continued to 
thrive as she started in 41 out of 48 
games. Now, Roos had a 1 .39 ERA, 
her best yet, according to NSU ath- 
letic web page. 

Currently in her senior year, Roos 
says her goal is for the Lady Demons 
to win conference play, as well as the 
tournament. 

"Everything I do now is for the last 
time," Roos said. "That alone makes 
you kick into another gear in hopes 
of leaving a lasting impression." 
Undoubtedly this pitcher will remain 
one of NSU's top "diamonds on the 
diamond." 







Pitcher Kylie Roos earned Pitcher of the Week honors earlier this month and has an ERA of 1.17. 



Lady Demon tennis splits final matches of season 



Kellie O'Brien 

Sauce Reporter 

Senior Andrea Nedorostova ce- 
mented her spot in the North- 
western State tennis record 
books but her effort wasn't enough 
to help the Lady Demons prevail, as 
NSU lost a tough battle against La- 
mar 4-3 on Saturday afternoon at the 
Thompson Family Tennis Center. 

"This was a disappointing loss, " 
said Lady Demon head coach Patric 
DuBois. "We came out and played 
very well in doubles and then went 
flat in singles." 

The Lady Demons move to 1 0-7 
overall and 5-3 in Southland Confer- 
ence action while Lamar advances to 
10-8,6-2. 

Nedorostova and teammate Tatia- 
na Larina posted an 8-5 victory over 
LU's Carolina Salas and Helene 
Czudek, pushing NSU's lone senior 
to the top of the school's career dou- 
bles wins ledger with a 68-10 record. 

A native of Brno, Czech Republic, 
Nedorostova is now the winningest 
doubles player in program history, 
surpassing former Lady Demon Bi- 
anca Schulz's career record of 67-21 
from 2008-11. 

"We are very proud of Andrea 
becoming the all-time leader in 
doubles victories during her career," 
said DuBois. "She has played with 
different partners during this time 
which shows her strong abilities in 
doubles." 

Nedorostova also improved her 




Andrea Nedorostova volleys the ball back to her opponent. She lead NSU to victory over MSU. 



career singles record to 58-20, which 
ties the No. 4 all-time wins record, 
after defeating Natalia Mayagoitia 
6-3, 7-6 (6) at the No. 4 position. 

Polina Konop and Natalya Kru- 
tova overtook Carolina Maso and 
Mayagoitia 8-3 at the No. 2 doubles 
spot while Daniela Simonova and 
Amy Williams took down Alicia 
Porte and Dariya Dashutina 8-7 (7- 
0) in the third position as the Lady 
Demons swept the doubles matches 
to start the day 1 -0. 

Konop grabbed the second singles 
v ictory for NSU, defeating Salas 7-6 
(2), 6-3 at the No. 1 spot. 
"Polina, again, played very well in 




both matches on today and I am very 
happy with her process of doing 
things," said DuBois. 
Lamar would rally in singles play, 
taking four of the six matches, to 
ov erride the doubles point and win 
the match. 

"In general we made too many er- 
rors in singles," said DuBois. "La- 
mar did a good job fighting and de- 
served the win today." 

For the next match, Nedorostova 
led the Northwestern State women's 
tennis team once again as the Lady 
Demons closed out the regular sea- 
son with a 4-3 victory over McNeese 
State on Sunday afternoon at the 



Q ft 

to 

C 

g 



Nancy Hank Tennis Center. 

The win improves NSU's record 
to 11-7 overall and 6-3 in Southland 
Conference play while the Cowgirls 
fall to 13-9, 4-5. 

"This match was as close as it gets 
with third set tiebreakers in the last 
two matches," DuBois. "Luckily, 
our senior (Nedorostova) was able 
to pull a win out. 

"It was a heartbreaking loss for 
Polina (Konop). who played a great 
match against the likely SLC player 
of the year. This was as high level a 
match as I have seen in many years 
in our conference." 

The Lady Demons came out 



strong, sweeping the doubles match- 
es to earn the doubles point and start 
the day with a 1-0 lead. 

Larina and Olga Leyshyna kept 
the momentum going as Larina de- 
feated Lara Pujol 6-1, 6-0 at the No. 
3 spot and Leyshyna overpowered 
Diana Pirciu 6-3, 6-3. 

"We did a great job in doubles to- 
day and it was great to see and Olga 
play their games in singles and take 
care of business in straight sets," 
said DuBois. "The others fought 
very hard but came up short against 
a very well coached and solid Mc- 
Neese squad." 

The Cowgirls would not go down 
easily; pulling within one at the 3-2 
mark after Anastasia Surkova won 
the No. 3 singles match and Anna- 
belle Peacock took the No. 6 match. 

It came down to the No. 4 and No. 
1 matches as Nedorostova and Ko- 
nop each went to three sets against 
their opponents. 

Nedorostova grabbed the first set 
against Andreea Nenu 6-3 before 
falling 3-6 in the second. The senior 
captain battled through a tough third 
set to eventually win in a 7-6 (6) tie- 
breaker and clinch the win for the 
Lady Demons. 

"I am confident that we are ready 
to play well as a team in the upcom- 
ing SLC tournament," said DuBois. 
The Lady Demons take a week off 
before traveling to Beaumont for the 
Southland Conference Tournament. 
Competition in the tournament be- 
gins on Thursday, April 25. 



Out on a Limb 




by Gary Kopervas 



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like us on Facebook @thecurrentsauce 



Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, April 24, 2013 o Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 98: Issue 21 



Same-sex 
marriage debate 
continues 

Janitza Vasquez 

Sauce Reporter 

In the United States only six states 
recognize same-sex marriage, 
while the remaining states ban 
same-sex marriage, defining mar- 
riage as between only a man and a 
woman. 

President Barack Obama brought 
the issue back to light recently when 
he declared his support for same-sex 
marriages during last year's presi- 
dential election. Obama was the first 
president to declare his support for 
same-sex marriage while in office. 

"At a certain point I've just con- 
cluded that for me, personally, it is 
important for me to go ahead and 
affirm that I think same-sex cou- 
ples should be able to get married," 
Obama shared during an interview 
with ABC News last fall. 

Since Obama has declared his 
support, the support towards same- 
sex marriage has grown, and so has 
the opposition. A NBC poll showed 
that support for same-sex marriage 
has increased from 5 1 percent in De- 
cember to currently 53 percent. Four 
months later, polls also show that op- 
position has grown the same amount 
from 40 to 42 percent. 

The polls reveal that 56 percent of 
Americans believe the federal gov- 
ernment should set marriage laws, 
and not the states. However, Obama 
supports the concept of states deter- 
mining their own marriage laws. 

Of the many states that have 
banned gay marriages, Louisiana is 
one of them. 

"The banning of same-sex mar- 
riage violates the constitutional right 
of all gay Americans," senior Alicia 
Brown said. She believes it is dis- 
crimination. 

"Because of the gender I chose to 
love, I can not marry them? What's 
the difference in telling me I cannot 
do something because I am black?" 
Brown said. 

While some of students may dis- 
agree with the banning of same sex 
marriages in Louisiana, others agree 
with it. "I have nothing against ho- 
mosexual couples, and while I agree 





Cadets go through a series of exercises to test 



lication of skills they've learned. Navigation and map literacy are among those skills. 



ROTC training equips future soldiers 

Training instills confidence in cadets 



T\ Johnson 

News Editor 

North Korea has raised political 
tensions across the world 
with a series of threats 
through North Korean leader Kim 
Jong Un over a six-week period. 
Among those threats were the 
launch of a nuclear strike against 
the United States. 

Although U.S. officials claim 
North Korea is not technologically 
advanced enough to back up Kim 
Jong Un's provocative threats, 
loved ones of those in the military 
are on the edge of their seats about 
the possibility of another war. 

"It's emotionally exhausting 
to think about my loved ones who 
have just returned not long ago 
having to leave again for another 
war," senior psychology major 
Angel Johnson said. "I didn't expect 



tohear about an o t h w w a l irff hy * 

lifetime." 

ROTC cadet and senior finance 
major Terrell Murdock said his 
training provided by the ROTC pro- 
gram and the Army Reserve makes 
him feel confident about doing his 
job as a soldier if war was officially 
declared. Murdock reached the 
highest rank achievable in ROTC-- 
CDT Battalion Commander. 

"We have a great program here 
that offers training and camps that 
teach you important skills every 
cadet or future soldier needs," Mur- 
dock said. "I've been taught how to 
perform under pressure and how to 
be mentally strong." 

Murdock said that the threats 
seem to have gotten more serious 
over time, however, like U.S. offi- 
cials, he's doubtful of North Korea's 
credibility of those threats targeting 
the United States. 

"I don't think North Korea 




Training promotes leadership and teamwork in among ROTC cadets. 



is prepared to go to war with the 
United States," Murdock said. "We 
have a very powerful military." 

Like Murdock, junior busi- 
ness major Marlon Dews strongly 
believes North Korea isn't equipped 
to fight the States, however, if they 
were, the U. S. military has pre- 
pared well in advance. 



Last March, the U.S., used heavy 
machinery to send a message to 
North Korea. 

B-52 bombers made flights over 
South Korea. The flight exercises 
enraged North Korea. 

"I think we are more than pre- 
pared to fight," Dews said. 



Scholarship 
honors the 
memory of 
colleague 

Courtesy of News Bureau 



A scholarship honoring the 
memory of Melinda Martin 
McClung has been estab- 
lished at Northwestern State Uni- 
versity by McClung's co-workers in 
the university's Registrar's Office. 
McClung was a Northwestern State 
alumna and worked in the Regis- 
trar's Office for over 22 years. She 
was killed in a traffic accident on 
March 24. 

"Among her many jobs, Melinda 
evaluated all transcripts that came in 
from other colleges and also helped 
determine eligibility of college ath- 
letes," said Registrar Lillie Frazier 
Bell. "She helped many students 
qualify for graduation through her 
knowledge and expertise in knowl- 
edge and evaluation of transfer cred- 
its. She was a dedicated and con- 
scientious employee and a loving 
mother of her two sons, Joseph and 
Michael." 

The Melinda Martin McClung 
Memorial Scholarship will be 
awarded to a student transferring 
into Northwestern State with a cu- 
mulative grade point average of 2.5 
or better. 

McClung's husband, Phillip Mc- 
Clung, is a popular and respected 
teacher at NSU Middle Lab School. 
Their son Joseph plans to attend 
Northwestern State this fall. 

McClung's colleagues initiated 
the scholarship in recognition of their 
friend's dedication to her family, her 
coworkers and the Northwestern 
State students she helped. McClung 
was instrumental in developing ad- 
ministrative policies and procedures 
on transfer credit, serving as the uni- 
versity liaison with other institutions 
and working tirelessly with mem- 
bers of the Louisiana Board of Re- 
gents in the development of transfer 
credit matrix systems. 

"Melinda was a long-time, de- 
voted member of the university fam- 
ily and my dear friend," said Barbara 
Prescott, assistant to the registrar. 



: of this story, ch« 
out www.newsnsula.edu 



Newly elected SGA president, vice president plan for SGA makeover 




Jarred Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 



s; 



SGA President Kyla Winey and Vice President Garrett Pierce 
plan for a more efficient senate to better serve students. The two 
newly elected student officials plan to give SGA a fresh start. 



oon to be Student Government 
I Association President Kyla 
Winey and Vice President Gar- 
rett Pierce are working together for a 
smoother senate that will help bridge 
the gaps between students, senate 
and faculty. Winey, communication 
major, and Pierce, a scholars' stu- 
dent studying philosophy, politics 
and law, have several ways to make 
the senate more efficient. 

"My main tenant is to restructure 
the SGA because in the past it hasn't 
served its maximum potential," 
Pierce said. 

He believes that a more efficient 
senate will allow them to better aid 
students. 

"We are going to increase the pro- 



fessionalism," Pierce said. 

As vice president Pierce oversees 
the senate to ensure they are in line 
with the laws and bylaws. He also 
checks their office hours and that 
they communicate with students. 

"My duties focus on the internal 
aspects of SGA, which is to give the 
tools to the senators," Pierce said. 

"We lead by example,'' Winey 
said. " I have a strong belief in being 
self-motivated. 

Winey will join forces with the 
Student Activities Board to form 
study halls in the union and have 
senators attend more campus events. 

She is also planning an event that 
would allow students to discuss their 
concerns with faculty and senators. 

Winey has been with SGA for 
one year and has been preparing for 
this position by attending workshops 
with other student government mem- 



bers from universities all over the 
state. 

"I have strong love for NSU and 
the political side of how it's run and 
I felt like president would be a great 
position for me," Winey said. 

Pierce been a part of SGA for two 
years now and wants to work with 
Winey to make SGA a better bridge 
between students and faculty. 

"I saw how effective the senate 
could be and I wanted to be that for 
the university," Pierce said. 

Many students were unaware of 
the lack of campaigning and infor- 
mation concerning the elections. 
This was largely to do with the fact 
that Winey and Pierce were the only 
ticket running and they won by ac- 
climation. 

"SGA can't do much about the 
ticket's campaign because there was 
nobody to campaign against," Di- 



rector of Student Activities, Yonna 
Posch, said. 

Posch also added that this can 
be viewed as favoritism. SGA must 
take a neutral stance until can- 
didates are inaugurated. Tickets 
closed in early March and Winey 
and Pierce officially won the elec- 
tion April 1 0. 

"It was a blessing in that we 
didn't have to campaign, but it 
doesn't make our position any less 
meaningful or any easier," Winey 
said. "It was a smooth transition, 
by winning by acclimation we had 
the approval of all the other sena- 
tors, that's important because we 
are moving forward and everyone 
will hopefully be on the same page 
as us," Pierce added. 

The inauguration is today in the 
Student Union Ballroom at 3:30 
p.m. and is open to the public. 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

84753° 



Thursday 

74761° 



Friday 

78765° 



Saturday 

80762° 





Sunday 

80762° 



Monday 

82761° 



Tuesday 

83759° 





Alexis Reliford 
Life Editor 
arelifor002@student.nsula.edu 

April 24, 2013 



Senior 
shares tips 
on supressing 
senioritis 

Janitza Vasquez 

Sauce Reporter 

Are you a senior in college and 
having a hard time staying 
focused, making decisions 
or skipping classes? Sounds 
like you have caught yourself a case 
of sen' oritis. Senioritis is a defined 
as an ; Iness that decreases students 
motivation towards their studies who 
are nearing the end of their college 
careers. 

Senioritis is a disease that affects 
high achieving, average and strug- 
gling students. As the end of their 
senior year approaches, many stu- 
dents feel entitled to some free time. 
They have been doing the same rou- 
tine for almost four years, and many 
of them are "over it." The conse- 
quences of senioritis include failing 
classes, lowered GPA's and possibly 
not graduating. Lucky for you all, 
1 have found five ways to suppress 
senioritis. 

Tip #1: Get motivated. Gradua- 
tion is right around the comer, and 
you'll be soon entering the real 
world. As long as you keep in mind 
what comes after graduation that 
should be enough motivation. If not, 
use whatever it is that you want to 
accomplish after college as your mo- 
tivation. 

Tip #2: Stay organized. By getting 
and staying organized, you are able 
to prioritize your list of things to do. 
If you organize your day, you might 
see that you have a little more free 
time than what you expected. Once 
you prioritize, you will be able to 
plan accordingly. 

Tip #3: Stay in shape! Once a 
student starts to catch senioritis, they 
tend to fall into a lazy routine. Re- 
search proves that exercising and 
eating healthy can make an individu- 
al more energized. The more energy 
you have, the more you can get ac- 
complished. So get up, hit the gym 
and kick senioritis to the curv e. 

Tip #4: Start a buddy system. If 
you're having a hard time staying 
focused, find someone who can help 
you stay focused. Both of you can 
help motivate and keep each other 
on track. 

Tip #5: Reward yourself. If you 
have been working hard and feel like 
you need to take a break, take it! If 
you work hard, and stay focused 
your deserve a reward. Your senior 
year is supposed to be your best year, 
so don't take it too seriously. 

Senioritis is a growing epidemic 
in many universities, but its not im- 
possible to beat. By finding a way to 
balance work and play, you should 
be able to successfully complete 
your senior year. 




Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

"Oblivion" 

4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"42' 

4:10 p.m. 6:50 pj. 9:20 p.m. 

"Scary Movie V s 

4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m.' 9:40 p.m. 

'Evil Dead" 

4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 



Members of the 2013-14 cheerleading squad and mascot at Northwestern State University are, front left to right, Emily O'Glee, Brittany Garcie, 
Kerri Laginess, Hanna Deloney, Lakyn Ward, Brieann Duenas, Caitlin Bowman, Kierra Cunningham, Lizzy DeBlieux, Avery Monrose, and Sarah 
Gandy, back left to right, Dylan Wallace, Cavonte Jones, David Bird, Shawn Fox, Cole Williams, John Simar, Rudolph Glass (Vic the Demon), Cade 
Stepp, Stefan Foster, Kiley Bell, Christian Broussard and Chase Stepp. 

New members chosen for spirit groups 



Jessica Blow 

Staff Writer 

Anxiousness and excitement 
filled, her body as she antici- 
pated the start of the music 
in the middle of the dance floor. "I 
can't do this," she thought to her- 
self. "I should just walk out." The 
music starts. Just as she was about 
to leave, the music takes control. 
Her body moves to the 
rhythm of the j^Kfa. 
beat, making 
every leap, 
turn and kick. 
Finally, the 
music stops. 
Breathing un- 
controllably, 
she strikes her 
pose, smiling, as 
the judges give her 
a standing ovation. 

More than 30 girls 
auditioned for Demon 
Dazzlers this past weekend 
in the Health and Human 
Performance building's dance studio. 

In the first round, the girls per- 
formed a 90-second solo followed 
by a round of cuts. Next they par- 




ticipated in a technique portion 
consisting of leaps, turn combina- 
tions and kicks. Finally the girls 
learned a 60-second routine choreo- 
graphed by Demon Dazzlers spon- 
sor and coach, Renee Oates. Once 
they had been taught the whole 
routine, the girls had a brief nve 1 ' 
minutes to review and perfect the 
dance to the best of their abilities. 

"The first and biggest thing the 
judges look for is showmanship," 
said senior social work Captain Fa- 
Ion Jackson. "To be in a spirit 
group, you have to really 
know how to perform for 
an audience not just going 
through the choreography." 

In small groups of three 
and four, the girls per- 
formed the dance in front of 
apanel of judges. Shortly af- 
ter, there was a final round of 
cuts and the 2013-2014 team 
of 11 ladies was announced. 
"Dance requires differ- 
ent emotions whether it is happy 
or sad," Jackson said. "A dancer 
is someone that can portray these 
emotions through dance, who can 
tell a story without speaking." 

The dancers know dancing very- 
well. Jackson has danced for about 
17 vears. with four vears she has 




Auditions for the Demon Dazzlers were held in the dance studio of the 
Health and Human Performance building on last Saturday. Eleven ladies 
were chosen to perform at throughout the year at various NSU events. 



danced at NSU. In the fall, it will 
be her first year as captain and 
the start of her fifth year at NSU. 

Twenty-three other students also 
celebrated this past weekend, as 
they became members of the cheer 
-leading squad. Vic the Demon, 
NSU's mascot, was also chosen. 

The Northwestern State cheer- 
leaders are the premiere spirit group 
for the university. They have the 



opportunity to cheer at all home 
football, basketball, volleyball and 
soccer games and most away foot- 
ball games. The squad also repre- 
sents NSU at various alumni and 
community functions and events. 

i prayed for something I could 
excel at and finally be able to say I 
have a talent," junior Shawn Fox said. 
"My prayers were answered when 
the judges called out the number 22." 



Students win big at SAB's Vegas Nighf 




Northwestern's Student Activities board hosted their annual "Vegas Night" on Tuesday. Card and arcade games, like 
poker and slot machines, adorned the Student Union Ballroom and lobby area and gave students the opportunity to win 
prizes including a MacBook Pro and a Kindle Fire. Prizes won also included an iPad Mini with retina display, Beats Audio 
Headphones, two pairs of Ray-Ban Sunglasses, an Xbox and Wii U game system. 



Students 
anticipate 
fun in the 
sun 

Janitza Vasquez 

Sauce Reporter 

With the end of the spring 
semester nearing, many 
students are eagerly antici- 
pating the start of summer break. The 
days are getting shorter and warmer, 
and everyone is looking for end- 
less fun. For the next two and a half 
months they are free to do whatever 
it is that they want. 

Many students start their freedom 
off by planning vacations. Student's 
summer vacations normally consist 
of beach trips with the most popular 
destinations being Miami and Pan- 
ama, FL and Galveston, TX. How- 
ever, locations include Dallas, TX, 
California, Orlando, FL and New 
York City. 

However, college students nor- 
mally don't have much money to 
plan with, so going out to eat and va- 
cationing, is out of the question for 
many. Although, according to junior 
Arteria Lewis, there are tons of fun 
things to do without breaking the 
bank 

"Me and my friends never have 
a dull summer," Lewis said. "None 
of us work, so money is slim, but we 
make it work. We normally just get 
together and hang. We plan get-to- 
gethers around the city so we're not 
spending money going out of town." 

While there should be lots of fun 
in the sun and vacations during the 
break, many students use that time 
to gain career-related experience. 
Students tend to have a hard time 
landing jobs after graduation due to 
little or no work experience. The ex- 
perience they may gain over the sum- 
mer through internships and jobs can 
maximize their chances of joining 
the workforce straight out of college. 

"My summer is going to be mostly 
all work and very little play," crimi- 
nal justice major, Kevin Shief said. 

"I plan on doing a internship this 
summer during the day, and get a job 
during the evening. I'll have to sac- 
rifice my summer but ultimately I'll 
be having the most fun when it's all 
over." 



Brainy Acts Poetry 
Society (BAPS) 

will be "holding its 
second poetry slam 
of the semester 
on Wednesday, 
April 24th, at 8:30 
p.m. in the Student 
union Ballroom. 
In addition to 
performances by 
BAPS members, 
there will be an 
open mike for any 
NSU 
students 
who 
wish to 
perform 
a poem v 
or * 



song. 

Please 

come * 

support 

your 

talented 

fellow 

students! 






pinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
cat.beverly@yahoo.com 
April 24, 20 1 3 



Social media is truly the greatest 
accomplishment of the 21st Century 



If you've ever had a conversation with me, you will have noticed how 
that I get extremely wild-eyed and loud when I start talking about social 
media. Regardless of popular belief, social media is an integral part of 
global society and anyone who denies it is absolutely a Communist or in- 
credibly old. 

Social media has helped revolutionize the world and here is why 

it is affects you. 

If any of you are like me, then your daily morning routine goes 
a little like this. You wake up, roll over and check your phone. Then 
you check Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook again and then 
Tw itter again. Finally you answer texts and get out of bed. 

The rest involves getting dressed, going to class where I check 
all of those sites again. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and sites 
like these have been thrown into our daily lives without us even Camille Mosley 




I am able to share my thoughts and be assured via likes, comments and 
retweets that others feel and think the same way that I do. 

This can in turn create whole new networks of people meeting people 
meeting people. 

This kind of phenomena is incredible because with Facebook, 
Twitter and Instagram, everyone is now faced with the choice of 
becoming friends with people they never would have originally be- 
come friends with. 

Barriers are broken down and suddenly, there is hope for human- 
ity that one day the traditions and cultures of our ancestors will 
become forgotten, or better respected and understood. 
We could have an entire generation who likes people because of 
their personalities and not some spout-out crap that has been in- 
grained in each and every one of us. 



noticing. Freshman Scholar 

They have changed the way we communicate, interact and even 
how we make fun of one another. 

I was not always a social media advocate. You see, I thought Twitter was 
Satan incarnate; Facebook was a knockoff of Myspace; Myspace was bor- 
ing but the greatest thing ever; and well, I had no real opinion of YouTube 
at the time. 

My viewpoint drastically changed after seeing the movie "The Social 
Network." The movie itself can be classified as realistic fiction because of 
all the dramatizations put in the film for Hollywood sake, however the birth 
of Facebook was perfectly depicted. 

What really got me in this movie is the amount of work put into making 
the site and the actual concept of Facebook. Facebook, along with Twitter 
and other social media sites, have created the perfect gateway to endless 
possibilities. 

Most people tend to focus on the negative, however it isn't all bad. 
Like most great concepts, there are flaws, but like I mentioned earlier, Face- 
book has changed the way we as humans interact with one another. Person- 
ally, I am able to connect with my family who is scattered across the country. 



The playing field is now level and we are all equal in statue. 
Why? All because you accepted a simple friend request. 
Social media is not evil or bad. The argument I make is that people simply 
abuse these sites. For every argument that I engage in with a 40-year-old and 
her bad grammar, there is an equal and opposite comment telling me how 
beautiful I am in my profile picture. 

With every bad aspect of anything, there is a "bright side," if you will 
,to counter the darkness. Facebook is not just a place to upload bikini and 
bathroom pictures. It is also a way to connect with old friends and plan with 
new friends. 

Twitter is not just a status update. Twitter is also a place to turn ideas 
into revolutions; it is a way to share thoughts, lessons, rants, and qualities 
with millions; it is a place where people — random people! — admire what 
you have to say. 

Twitter is a way to gain followers and connect with people who truly 
acknowledge what you have to say. Social media, when used and understood 
properly, is the greatest idea to happen to the 2 1 st century. As an advocate 
on behalf of social media, I hope to one day show people how and why it is 
important. 



The importance of not taking sunshine for granted 



My time in Cleveland has 
definitely sparked a new 
appreciation for sunshine. 
After a w inter season of cloudy 

skies and slippery 
JH^B snow sun rays are 

a welcome treat. 
^^^^L Many feel exactly 
JEHHSmHI the opposite 
Jacob Labutka about the sun, 
Style Columnist especially in 

a state with 
as wonderful weather as Louisiana 
(especially for those who love being 
hot, humid messes). However, I do 
declare that the sun should not be 
taken for granted. 

It is a rule of thumb that too 
much of a good thing typically 
becomes something horrible. We 
are all w ell aware of how prolonged 
sub exposure makes our sweat 
glands run like the Nile and gives 
us that not so desirable "lobster 
tan." 

Take a moment and reflect 
what life would be like without 
sunshine. That entails no rainbows, 
no skipping through sunny 
meadows (which means no "Sound 




A sunny day in front of the Cleveland Institute of Art. 



Of Music") and no flowers. That 
doesn't sound like the world in my 
children's books to me. 

Granted, no matter where you 
live the sun peaks out at some point 
(unless you live in a cave in the 
Arctic or under your bed sheets 



where the sun can't find you). 
However, prolonged time without 
sun can be quite depressing. 
I'm not saying that being in the 
sun all of the time is a great thing, 
but it shouldn't be something that's 
taken for granted. Going to the 



pool or beach or having a picnic are 
activities that are useless without 
that nearby star whose rays give 
power to solar panels. 

The moral of the story is simple: 
go outside. You shouldn't brave 
the possibly of scorching outdoors 
if you're dehydrated or allergic to 
grass and plants 

Yet, if your mind is becoming 
numb from a Netflix binge and your 
bones are about to break from a lack 
of Vitamin D, then you might need 
sunshine. 

If the sun is too much to handle 
after a little while, then you'll 
always have the comforts of A/C 
and cherry popsicles to go back to 
(unless Natchitoches decides to lose 
power). Also, a bad mosquito day 
is also a very good reason to stay 
indoors no matter how good the 
w eather may be. 

Despite its setbacks, sunshine 
is a wonderful commodity that can 
be utilized for one's own personal 
well being and create a magnificent 
outdoor aesthetic (dare I say 
gardening). Take a step outside, 
smell the flowers and look up 
(sunglasses advised). 




: # We .need w n te rs J . \ 

Our newspaper needs more stories written by 
students! If you are interested, come by our 
office, 227 Kyser. 

Staff positions are available at the start of eacl 
semester and volunteer positions are year- 
round! 

Meetings are every Monday at 4:00 p.m. We 

hope to hear from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 




The 




u rrent 

a uce 



Jimmie Walker 


Andrea Nederostova 


Editor-in-Chief 


Sauce Reporter 


Dr. Paula Furr 


Contessa Wills 


Adviser 


Sauce Reporter 


Ty Johnson 


Damian Glover 


News Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Alexis Reliford 


Chris Degeyter 


Life Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Jimmie Walker 


Jessica Blow 


Sports Editor 


Sauce Reporter 


Catherine Beverly 


Linda Ahlskog 


Opinions Editor 


Social Media 


Kirstie White 


Camille Mosley 


Copy Editor 


Freshman Scholar 


Jacob Labutka 


Taylor Furr 


Lifestyle Columnist 


Delivery Personnel 



Office phone 
318-357-5456 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



'Moonstruck' 

An oldie but goodie 



Rating: • ••< 

Annie Desoto-Buras 

Guest columnist 



O 



It's time for a throwback 
review, and this one's from 
1987. Moonstruck follows the 
romantic adventures of an Italian- 
American woman in New York 
who has to figure out how to juggle 
her job, her family, a fiance and his 
family. 

Loretta Castorini (Cher) is ready 
to get married again. After being 
widowed some years before, she has 
been working as an accountant and 
living with her well-to-do parents. 
So when Jonny Cammareri (Danny 
Aiello) proposes, she is looking for 
a change in her life and accepts, 
even though she isn't in love with 
him. 

When her new fiance flies back 
to Sicily to visit his dying mother, 
he asks Loretta to contact his 
brother and fix the bad blood that 
has been between the two for years. 

Armed with this previously- 
unknown brother's business card, 
she sets out to invite him to the 
upcoming wedding. 

Ronny Cammareri (Nicolas 
Cage) is nothing like his quiet, 
nervous brother. After ranting 
about bad blood and lost hands, 
Ronny agrees to let Loretta cook 
for him and to hear her out about 
mending the rift between him and 



Johnny. They end up doing a bit 
more than talking, however, and the 
next morning Loretta retracts the 
wedding invitation. Ronny agrees 
not to go to the wedding on the 
condition that Loretta agree to go 
with him to the opera that night. 

Loretta's parents have been 
having romantic difficulties as 
well. Her father Cosmo Castorini 
(Vincent Gardenia) has been having 
an affair, and Rose Castorini 
(Olympia Dukakis) is becoming 
suspicious. 

When she goes out to dinner 
and meets the wannabe playboy 
Perry (John Mahoney), his flattery 
and attentions start to look pretty 
tempting to the romantically- 
neglected housewife. 

What will happen when Granda 
Castorini, who lives with the family, 
sees Rose and Perry walking arm-in 
-arm back from the restaurant? 

How will things work out when 
Loretta and Ronny run into Cosmo 
and his mistress at the opera? 
How will even one deal w ith 
Johnny Cammareri's "miracle" and 
his returning unexpectedly? I, of 
course, know the answer. 

If you want to find out, how ever, 
you should definitely go find this 
movie and watch it. Even if you 
don't want to find out, you should 
watch it anyway; it's funny and 
witty and one of my personal all- 
time favorite films. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 





PORTS 



Jimmie W alker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 

April 24, 2013 




Cassandra Barefield is met with her Lady Demon teammates after rounding the bases following a homerun against Houston Baptist. 

Softball earns SLC Tournament berth 

Lady Demons gets its sixth series win with victories over Houston Baptist 



Brittany Russ 

Sauce Reporter 

After defeating Houston Bap- 
tist 6-1 Sunday afternoon, the 
Northwestern State Softball 
team clinched a Southland Confer- 
ence Tournament berth, giving the 
Lady Demons the opportunity to 
play in front of local fans as they 
host the tournament at the Lady De- 
mon Diamond May 9-11. 

The tournament will feature the 
top six teams in the conference at the 
end of the regular season with the 
No. 1 and No 2 seeds receiving a bye 
into the second round. 

The Lady Demons (34-10 overall, 
1 5-5 SLC) currently sit second in the 
league, just one-and-a-half games 
behind first place McNeese State 
(35-11 overall, 16-3 SLC). 

NSU has picked up wins in 10 
of its last 12 games, including two 
conference sweeps in a row over 



Stephen F. Austin and Houston Bap- 
tist, respectively. 

Senior pitcher Kylie Roos threw 
her second complete game of the 
weekend as the Northwestern State 
softball team picked up the South- 
land Conference series sweep over 
Houston Baptist Sunday afternoon 
at the Lady Demon Diamond. 

With the win, the Lady Demons 
improve to 34-10 ov erall, 15-5 in the 
Southland as the Huskies fall to 13- 
22, 6-15 in the league. 

The Lady Demons found them- 
selves tied at one heading into the 
third inning, only to have Shenequia 
Abby, Tara McKenney and Brittany 
Virgoe load up the bases to bring up 
Brianna Rodriguez with no outs. 

Rodriguez single to first base and 
drove in Abby. The Lady Demons 
picked up another run oft" an error 
by catcher Melissa Herman before 
bringing up Cassandra Barefield. 

Barefield sent a SAC fly to center 
field and picked up the RBI as Vir- 



goe and McKenney were sent home. 

Freshman Natalie Landry kept the 
momentum going as she sent a two- 
run shot over the center field wall to 
put HBU at a distance in the bottom 
of the fourth. The homer marked her 
sixth of the season. 

The Huskies broke the game open 
early in the first with a homer by 
SLC RBI leader Kirsten Schwirtlich, 
only to have NSU answer back. 

Rodriguez picked up her 16 lh 
double of the season with a shot to 
right center and was driven in by 
Barefield. 

With the double, Rodriguez ties 
Margaret Patterson and Misty Car- 
raways NSU individual season re- 
cords set in 2006 and 1994, respec- 
tively. 

Roos struck out five of 26 batters 
faced and allowed seven hits on the 
day. Rodriguez led from the plate, 
going two-for-three and picking up 
one RBI, followed by Landry and 
Barefield posting one-for-three stints 



and two RBI each. 

"It feels really good for our kids 
to come out here and play a competi- 
tive team like Houston Baptist," said 
head coach Donald Pickett. "'We had 
a lot of momentum today, which is 
big in this sport, so using that to our 
full potential has won us some big 
games this season." 

With just two weeks left in the 
regular season, the Lady Demons are 
set to travel to Southeastern Louisi- 
ana and host Sam Houston State, 
while the Cowgirls will hit the road 
to visit the Bearkats and Nicholls 
State. 

The three-game series with the 
Lady Lions begins on Saturday at 
3:00 p.m., followed by a break in the 
conference schedule as they travel to 
No. 9 LSU on April 30 for a single 
game beginning at 6:00 p.m. 

NSU hosts Sam Houston State 
for the final series of the season be- 
ginning on May 4 at 1 :00 p.m. at the 
Lady Demon Diamond. 



Athletes raise money to buy shoes for children in need 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Staff Reporter 

The Student-Athlete Advisory 
Committee has done one of 
its biggest fundraisers of the 
year — Toms Week of Service. The 
purpose is to raise enough money 
to be able to put shoes on each child 
from Natchitoches Boys & Girls 
Club and other children that are in 
need around the world. 

All this can be done thanks to 
the partnership between the South- 
land Conference and TOMS shoes. 
Putting shoes on children in need 
was an idea of an American traveler 
Blake Mycoskie who met children 
in a village in Argentina that had no 
shoes to protect their feet. 

He created TOMS company and 
every pair of shoes that is purchased 
guarantees another new pair of shoes 
for a child in need, which is known 
as "One for One." 

The goal of SAAC is to raise 
$1,400. Half of this amount was 
raised last week thanks to the dedi- 
cation of athletes who were proac- 
tive each day of last week. 

"On Monday we did a Campus 
Wide C lean-Up," said Assistant Ac- 



ademic Coordinator for NSU athlet- 
ics, Kelee Grimes. 

"Each team was designated spe- 
cific buildings on campus and they 
went out and spent about an hour in 
that building talking with the fac- 
ulty and asking what they needed 
cleaned or done for them. Tuesday 
was Chunk Your Change, so they 
stood out on the corner of the Stu- 
dent Union and collected money 
from passersby from 10 a.m. to 3 
p.m. that day. 

Wednesday was Povverade Pong. 
We held that in Prather Coliseum. 
That was for intramural points and 
we had over 100 teams participating 
in it. 

Thursday was a Community In- 
volvement, and we had the student- 
athletes going out to local businesses 
and asking them for donations," said 
Grimes. 

When enough money is raised, 
SAAC plans to put on an event 
called "Style Your Sole," which 
will enable NSU student-athletes to 
meet children from Natchitoches for 
whom the money is being raised. 

At this one-night event children 
will have an opportunity to meet ath- 
letes and decorate their new shoes 




The Student-Athletic Advisory Committee initiated the Toms 
Week of Service to raise enough money to put shoes on the feet 
of kids from the Natchitoches Boys and Girls Club. 



with their help. 

"As soon as we get our entire 
SI, 400, which we are looking at do- 
ing another fundraiser one week in 
the fall, we are planning on host- 
ing a "Style Your Sole" party where 
we will bring in the kids and allow 
them to decorate their shoes and get 
some one on one interaction with 
our athletes. The athletes will go and 
present them with their shoes," said 
Grimes. 

A small donation of S22 can buy 



two pairs of shoes for children in 
need — one local child and one child 
from across the world. If you de- 
cided to help, contact Carrie Crowell 
at crowelIc@nsul.edu or 318-357- 
4451. Donations may be sent to the 
following address: 

Attn: Carrie Crowell, Athletic 
Fieldhouse, 468 Caspari Street, 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

Please make checks payable to the 
NSU Athletic Association, memo: 
TOMS. 





NBA divisional rivals 
meet in first round 




Chris Degeyter 

Staff Reporter 



Atlantic division rivals the New 
York Knicks and Boston Celt- 
ics meet in the first round of 
the Eastern Conference Playoffs. 

The second-seeded Knicks stayed 
consistently 

good this season ^VyfliB 
including a 13- 
game w in streak 
over March 
and April. New- 
York finished 
54-28 on the 
season. 

The sev- 
enth-seeded 
Celtics fought 

through an early season slump, a late 
season slump, and the loss of star 
point guard Raj on Rondo to a sea- 
son-ending ACL tear to finish 41-40 
in the regular season. 

On paper, this round is an easy 
four or five games for the Knicks. 
Boston is a team of old, worn out 
players having a relatively low year 
and missing assist and triple-double 
leader Rajon Rondo. The Knicks 
would easily be the hottest team 
in the East right now if not for the 
record-shattering star-studded sea- 
son of LeBron James and the Miami 
Heat. 

While the Knicks arc officially 
the second oldest team in the league, 
many of their players do not play to 
their age like the Celtics do. While 
anyone can tell Kevin Garnett 
and Paul Pierce are slowly getting 
slower, more tired and more injury- 
prone, the Knicks keep kicking and 
keep looking like a young, fast- 
paced offensive team. Star forward 
Carmelo Anthony won the regular 
season scoring title this year and the 
Knicks rank It* in points per game 
and seventh in points allowed per 
game. New York won the regular 
season series 3- 1 . 

However, history is on the Celt- 



ics' side in this matchup. Ov er the 
last several years, the Celtics have 
been relatively highly seeded and 
have won the Atlantic division for 
the last five years while the Knicks 
have been barely scraping enough 
w ins to make a seven or eight seed. 

While the Celtics have made it 
out of the first round for the last five 
years including making the East- 
ern Conference finals last year, the 
Knicks have not made it out of the 
first round since the 1999-2000 sea- 
son. Boston has only once in five 
years lost a playoff series in less than 
seven games. The Knicks have not 
had a playoff series last more than 
five games since the '99-'00 season. 

New York was swept by Boston 
in this round just two years ago, and 
lost in five games to Miami last year. 
Carmelo Anthony has a reputation 
among non-Knicks fans as a choker 
in the playoffs. Boston with rela- 
tively the same current lineup and 
under coach Doc Rivers has exten- 
sive playoff experience including a 
Championship in the 2007-2008 sea- 
son and a seven-game Finals appear- 
ance in the 2009-2010 season. 

Being division rivals also leads 
these two teams to a serious rivalry 
and so both teams are playing harder 
than any other set of teams. During 
one regular season matchup, Celt- 
ics star Kevin Garnett trash-talked 
Knicks star Carmelo Anthony and 
got under his skin so much that An- 
thony went to the Celtics team bus 
after the game to yell words of his 
own back at Garnett. More is at stake 
for these teams than just their play- 
off runs. 

Stats give the New York Knicks 
the easy win in this series. History 
gives the Boston Celtics the easy 
win in this series. The Knicks cur- 
rently lead the series 1-0 but nobody 
expects this series to be over quickly. 



■0. 



Dynomite:Old friends 
meet in NBA playoffs 



What's a more compelling 
storyline than having an 
old teammate meet you 
in the playoffs? For Kevin Du- 
rant and Russell Westbrook, that 
is exactly the case as their team is 
pitted against James Harden and his 
Houston Rockets for a first-round 
Western Con- 
ference series 
in the NBA 
playoffs. 

The 
Rockets are 
back in the 

playoffs after Hk( 

three long Jimmie Walker 

seasons with- Editor . in . Chief 
out making it 

to the postseason. All credit can be 
giv en to the team's general man- 
ager, Daryl Morey, as he was able 
to snag Harden after his remarkable 
season with the Thunder. 

Houston finished the season with 
a record of 45-37, just enough to 
earn an eight-seeded berth. Harden, 
the reigning Sixth Man, won't be 
defending his title this season as he 
was a starter the rockets, averaging 
25 point per game. 

The Oklahoma City Thunder 




managed to put together its best sea- 
son, finishing 60-22 and locking up 
the No. 1 seed for the Western Con- 
ference. Durant had to fill the void 
of a James-less Thunder, which he 
did. Durant joined the very exclu- 
sive 50-40-90 club and evolved his 
game completely. That isn't the best 
part. Kevin Martin was acquired 
by the Thunder in the Harden trade 
and he has been a star for OKC, al- 
lowing the team to not miss a beat. 
Martin av eraged 14 points per game 
and has been great defensively for 
the Thunder. 

The two teams met three times 
in the regular season w ith OKC 
getting the better of Houston two 
times. Each time OKC won, the 
Thunder held the Rockets under 100 
points w hile scoring at least 120 
points. Houston's only win came 
February 20 when the Rockets sput- 
tered a 122-1 19 w in at home against 
the Thunder. 

The first playoff game between 



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